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Archive for June 20th, 2012

Nathaniel Kunkel’s Studio Without Walls Delivers Award-Winning Projects with HARMAN’s JBL LSR Studio Monitors

Nathaniel Kunkel includes JBL Professional LSR Series studio monitors as a crucial part of his Studio Without Walls business.

NORTHRIDGE, California – Nathaniel Kunkel has a unique take on recording and mixing: instead of making the artist come to the recording studio, he can bring the studio to the artist. Kunkel’s Studio Without Walls is based on a transportable production system that allows him to capture performances and produce records wherever the artist feels most comfortable and creative. And, Kunkel notes, it wouldn’t be possible without HARMAN’s JBL LSR Series studio monitors.

Kunkel has earned GRAMMY(r) Awards for his work with B.B. King and Robin Williams, and received an Emmy(r) for “A&E In Concert: Sting: Sacred Love.” Other recent projects include mixes for The Police, Carole King, Darlingside, and the recent tribute album Listen to Me: Buddy Holly-produced by Peter Asher and featuring performances by Brian Wilson, Stevie Nicks, Ringo Starr, Zooey Deschanel, Cobra Starship, Lyle Lovett, Linda Ronstadt and many others.

“The JBL LSR studio monitors are absolutely unique in their ability to give me good mixes and accurate sound wherever I go,” said Kunkel. “Although there are other speakers that I like, the LSR monitors are the only ones that give me consistent and repeatable results regardless of the room I use them in. When I do a mix in one room using LSR, I know it’s going to translate well when I listen to the mix in another environment.”

Depending on the project, Kunkel uses the JBL LSR6300 or LSR4300 Series monitors for Studio Without Walls. “The RMC [Room Mode Correction] is invaluable in that it compensates for the peaks in a room’s low-frequency response and the differences in bass when speakers are placed closer to or farther away from the rear wall,” he said. “With this feature, I know I’m hearing accurate bass no matter where I take the speakers.”

“I know that when I’m recording and mixing on the LSR’s I’m not missing something that will be a surprise when I get into another room,” Kunkel added. “In fact, setup of the LSR4300′s is ridiculously easy. I just plug the calibration microphone into one of the speakers, push a button and the system does the rest. What could otherwise take hours takes seconds. I’ll always set the speakers up for midfield listening if room allows. I try and avoid the console surface reflections as much as possible.”

In addition, Kunkel noted the LSR monitors provide remarkably high output even though they’re compact. “When I have to carry a full surround sound speaker setup to a client, that becomes an important consideration,” Kunkel said.

For more information on Studio Without Walls, please visit www.studiowithoutwalls.com

HARMAN (www.harman.com) designs, manufactures and markets a wide range of audio and infotainment solutions for the automotive, consumer and professional markets – supported by 15 leading brands, including AKG(r), Harman Kardon(r), Infinity(r), JBL(r), Lexicon(r) and Mark Levinson(r). The Company is admired by audiophiles across multiple generations and supports leading professional entertainers and the venues where they perform. More than 25 million automobiles on the road today are equipped with HARMAN audio and infotainment systems. HARMAN has a workforce of about 13,000 people across the Americas, Europe and Asia, and reported net sales of $4.3 billion for the twelve months ended March 31, 2012.

Jünger Audio Brings Audio Loudness Control To Asian Broadcasters

German dynamics processing manufacturer Jünger Audio has noted a significant upturn in sales in the Far East as broadcasters in the region explore new ways of controlling audio loudness in the broadcast chain.

Renowned throughout the world for its sophisticated Loudness control solutions, Jünger Audio has recently supplied stand-alone and frame-based loudness control systems to broadcasters and systems integrators in Malaysia, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Thailand, Singapore, Taiwan, China and the Philippines.

Recent clients have included TVB Hong Kong, which has taken delivery of three Jünger Audio T*AP TV Audio Processors and three C8000 frame-based loudness control systems; NBTV in China, which has installed six Jünger Audio D*AP LM4 four-channel Digital Audio Processors, and Hong Kong-based PCCW, which has invested in a Jünger Audio C8486 loudness control system for its NOW TV channel.

Mr Shi-Song Wu, director of NBTV’s Technical Centre, says: “We installed six D*AP LM4 units and their performance has been great. We are very impressed with their ability to accurately control audio loudness across all of our television channels.”

Jünger Audio’s CEO Peter Pörs says: “Television audiences in the Far East are no different to those anywhere else in the world – they don’t like surprise level changes in their audio and they complain when they have to reach for the remote, especially between programmes and commercial breaks.

“Although there are no hard and fast rules in the region regarding audio loudness, we are finding that many broadcasters in the Far East are choosing to adopt the ITU 1770 and EBU R128 standards in order to give their audiences a better viewing experience. As our audio loudness systems support all known loudness standards including ITU, EBU and ATSC, we are ideally placed to help broadcasters as they negotiate these complex changes. Very often our role as educators is just as important as the technology we provide and we are noticing a significant increase in demand for both products and advice.”

Junger Audio’s frame-based C8000 audio loudness control system and its new *AP family of stand-alone processors, which includes the award winning T*AP TV Audio processor, are proving especially popular because they all incorporate the company’s proprietary LEVEL MAGIC™ adaptive control algorithm that complies with ITU, EBU and ATSC Loudness standards.

“Broadcasters like the fact that LEVEL MAGIC™ can adjust the audio level from any source at any time, with no pumping, breathing or distortion,” Peter Pörs adds. “As a result it is becoming the algorithm of choice for line and real time processing throughout Europe and we are seeing the same pattern repeated in the Far East.”

Jünger Audio’s LEVEL MAGIC™ algorithm is based on a simultaneous combination of an AGC, a Transient Processor for fast changes and a “look ahead” Peak Limiter for continuous unattended control of any programme material, regardless of its original source. Capable of using any kind of I/O (Analog and Digital) sources, as well as SDI, HD/SDI, Dolby 5.1 and all its related metadata, LEVEL MAGIC™ is available in a variety of configurations to suit different applications.

-ends-

About Jünger Audio
Established in Berlin in 1990, Jünger Audio specialises in the design and manufacture of high-quality digital audio dynamics processors. It has developed a unique range of digital processors that are designed to meet the demands of the professional audio market. All of its products are easy to operate and are developed and manufactured in-house, ensuring that the highest standards are maintained throughout. Its customers include many of the world’s top radio and TV broadcasters, IPTV providers, music recording studios and audio post production facilities. www.junger-audio.com

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DiGiCo SD10 Will Rock You On Summer Queen Extravaganza Tour

Imagine being plucked from obscurity by a musical hero and hand-selected to be part of a tribute band celebrating the music of the iconic band Queen. That’s just what happened to nine veritably unknown singers and musicians from around the globe, chosen by Queen guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor, architects of the band’s sound, for The Queen Extravaganza summer tour band. Taylor, who took on the role of show producer and music director, wanted to create the ultimate Queen concert experience in an electrifying road show designed by a heavyweight production team headed by stage designer Mark Fisher, (known for memorable productions including “The Wall” for Pink Floyd and every Rolling Stones show since 1989) and Rob Sinclair (Adele, Peter Gabriel, Queen, Pet Shop Boys and Vampire Weekend). The tour celebrates Queen’s legacy and music, performed by some of the best new talent they could find.

Launched at the end of May, the tour travels to theatres in cities coast to coast across the United States and Canada through early July. At FOH is engineer James McCullagh, who manages the entire audio production from the helm of a DiGiCo SD10. Going into the tour, McCullagh was adamant about his console choice, having worked with DiGiCo SD desks on previous excursions with artists from Lucinda Williams to Journey. 



“I knew that I wanted to use a DiGiCo,” McCullagh recalls. “I said right up front it was non-negotiable. I’m a big fan of DiGiCo and I like the sound of the consoles. I’m familiar with the layout and it works well for me. There are a few things that I have in my arsenal that I knew would be beneficial in working with this band and the DiGiCo console is one of them. DiGiCo’s layout and functionality proves to be so much easier for me to run a show, and on this one, we’ve got nine singers onstage, 12 different effects channels running at one particular time, maybe seven to eight functional cues per song… There’s a lot going on and I needed a console that could deal with the intricacies of making that happen. For me it was a no-brainer to use a DiGiCo to ensure I would be able to get that huge drum sound and layered mass of vocals that Queen are known for.



“The problem was we had a hard time finding an available SD10 for the start of the rehearsals in Canada because they were all out on hire,” he adds, “but eventually, Clair Brothers was able to locate one. What was interesting was that, for the first week and a half, I was using a competitor’s console and it was the first time that I’d actually ever had a chance to A/B a console—in the same scenario, in the same room, with the same band, with the same mics and the same PA, and under the same conditions. And the difference between the two consoles was like night and day! It was like somebody pulled a blanket off the mix. People who didn’t even know that I’d changed consoles came up to me going, ‘What did you do to the sound? It sounds so much better!’ I’ve used all the digital consoles out there and they all do the job, but I was never really aware of the actual sound difference. All of a sudden it was like there was air over the cymbals and the vocal that was gone on the other console. The low end was just like somebody opened up a floodgate of lows that just extended on the SD10. I think the DiGiCo console is the closest digital console that you’re going to get to an analog sound. They’ve really gotten the conversions right; they’re really good. The way the console sounds is excellent, and a whole lot more functional for me. That was quite a revelation.” 



Going into rehearsals, the Queen Extravaganza touring band—comprised of four vocalists and five musicians—had never played together in the same room. They united in Toronto for a two-week band rehearsal (followed by a two-week production run-through in Montreal) to polish the plethora of material for their two-hour show: roughly 40 of the band’s biggest chart hits, finest heavy-duty rock based anthems, and early-period Queen numbers. Not surprisingly, the band’s input count came to 48 inputs, which included 16 channels of drum, two channels of bass, four channels of guitar (“part of getting Brian May’s guitar sound is miking the front and back of the Vox AC30 and we’ve got two guitarists on each end”), six channels of piano and keyboard, and nine channels of vocals as everyone in the band sings.


”I wanted to track and record all the rehearsals on separate tracks and being able to do that via MADI was one of the big advantages of using the DiGiCo,” said McCullagh. “I know that there are other consoles out there now that can do it as well but my first experience of doing that was with the DiGiCo via an RME MADI card into my MacBook Pro laptop and a separate hard drive. It’s very useful to be able to record and have anyone in the band, or the musical director, or Roger, come back and listen to a particular track.”

McCullagh made use of extensive grouping to organize all the vocals as well as snapshots on most of the songs for vocal routing and vocal balancing. “Obviously, each singer has their own channel, but sometimes the lead singer is the lead singer and sometimes he’s the backing singer,” he explains. “I created a stereo group and called it ‘backing vocals’ and sent all the backing vocals into that group and then I slammed that with a compressor. The Queen songs have very intricate harmonies and each vocalist sings at a different level. It was too much to have nine compressors going across nine channels over a loud rock band with drums and everything. It was easier for me to put one compressor over a group. That way, if someone sings slightly harder, or if I push a level a little bit too hard, that vocal won’t just jump out and sound awkward. It’s all squashed back into the mix and that helps to get that really tight, layered Queen harmony sound. I’m using the Waves LA2A plug-in, which is an awesome-sounding plug-in and very close to the real thing, and it does a real good job in smoothing out all the peaks and lows of the backing vocals. On each vocalist, I’m running an LA2A as well as a C6 multiband compressor, which helps take out any little areas where somebody’s voice might be a little resonant or deficient. With the dynamic range that Freddie Mercury had, each vocalist goes through a lot of changes and the C6 certainly helps to smooth it all out and make the voice sound completely natural.



“In addition, I’m running two TC4000′s and a TC Helicon VoiceLive on the vocals as well as an Eventide H3000 Harmonizer for the flange sounds. I sat down with Roger and we’ve very carefully gone over what they did in the studio and how he wanted to recreate it live. One thing I want to mention adamantly is that I’m not using any tricks or any doublers or harmonizers on any vocals to provide layering. All the layering is strictly from the singers. The massive sound is all them; there’s no artificial recreation or any of that. That’s important to say because we don’t want people to think that it’s all technology that’s making them sound like they do. These guys are sounding that way because they’re that good!”



For the extensive drum kit, McCullagh is running two parallel stereo busses. One is an unprocessed group feeding into another group, which is then compressed. “I’m running a Waves API 2500 plug-in across that, which is super-compressed with a lot of snap and a lot of pop-punch. I then blend those two busses to get the drum sound that I want, because obviously the drum sounds changed from the ‘70s to the ‘80s. In the ‘70s, it was more natural sounding and in the ‘80s, everything became very compressed and over-EQ’d. I didn’t want to be changing my drum sounds on snapshots or re-EQing my drums for every song, so I basically took various different balances of ungated and uncompressed, natural-sounding drum kits and very heavily EQ’d and compressed sounding drum kits, and blended the two together for my drum sound.”



McCullagh routes the toms to both drum busses and then to a third buss, which he calls “fat toms.” “I’ve got some Waves Renaissance Bass and VEq vintage EQs going on there and then I’ve pasted all the sub-harmonics of the toms and a little bit of cut so whenever there’s a big purposeful tom hit, I can fatten up the toms by riding in a little of the extra tom buss. Obviously, if I leave it on permanently when there are some really busy tom fills, then it’ll just sound like a bunch of low end and you don’t want that much low end on the toms. You want it to cut a bit more like a single tom hit, especially on songs like ‘We Will Rock You’ or ‘Another One Bites the Dust.’ By doing that I can really push it up and get a really huge tom sound.”

For the rest of the band sound, McCullagh employs minimal onboard effects. “The guitars are pretty much run with a flat EQ,” he says. “There are two Vox AC30s turned up to stun with a mic in front of them and then I just put the fader up. The piano sounds—we have a grand piano and some keyboards—are pretty much just using a bit of EQ and not much compression or anything going on there. My main focus for this band is all about getting huge drum sounds, great guitar sounds, and a massive wall of vocals… that’s pretty much how Queen worked and that’s what I’ve gone for.”



One of the features McCullagh is enjoying the most at the moment is the SD10′s Macro Smart Keys, which helps with myriad cues he’s managing from song to song. “I’m using a bunch of them,” he says. “I might use a delay in one part of a song or a delay on just a guitar just in one part of a song and not the rest, and they enable me to turn a vocal delay on and off without having to do that in my snapshots. I use them for mute buttons, to pull up my snapshots, open my snapshots page, and open my notes page. I’ve created a buss features page, and I have them to turn on reverbs for guitars, and turn on delays for vocals and guitars. I have another button assigned to turn my pink noise on and off, and another to switch between the playback on the computer, the recorded tracks, or the actual mic onstage. So without having to go to a drop-down menu, I can just hit the button and switch. All of my tracks that are recorded are coming back up on the same channels on the console, so we can listen to it in real time and make changes, get compression levels, and dial in EQs. It’s very handy when you’re trying to get a tom EQ or a tom gate set. You can just dupe a section of the toms, press Play, and keep hitting the same tom over and over again and set your gates and EQ and then move on to the next. It’s a very handy process. Another cool thing is you can assign a color to a button and it’s got a dual function. For example, it can be green when it’s on and red when it’s off, which is really handy in the dark.”



With the tour now in full force, McCullagh says he’s not surprised rave reviews are flooding in, given the stellar level of music, lighting and video offered at a time when many show productions are scaling back. “I haven’t seen this level of production for a theatre show,” he marvels. “Not in this day and age when people are dealing with shrinking budgets because of financial constraints. But even with our tight budget, these guys have managed to make it feel like the stadium shows the way Queen used to do it. That’s the level of production that they’ve put together and they’ve done a fantastic job because, whether you’re a Queen fan or not, you’re going to walk out of the show saying, ‘Wow! That was amazing! I definitely got my money’s worth!’

“Another thing: In this era, where tons of bands are using Pro Tools rigs and playing to backing tracks, we don’t have any. Everything that you hear is 100% live. All the harmonies are from the guys singing. There is no miming, no tracks, no help. In fact, I haven’t worked with a band in a long time, except Lucinda Williams, who hasn’t used backing tracks. On this tour, there’s nothing, and I think that’s pretty impressive. The band and singers are awesome and they are going to blow people’s minds. But what do you expect when you’ve got Roger and Brian at the controls, handpicking them?”

CreaTV San Jose Production Van with Broadcast Pix Granite Improves Public Access Programming

Billerica, Massachusetts – Broadcast Pix™ today announced CreaTV San Jose, which provides four public access and education channels for San Jose, Calif., has rolled out its first mobile production vehicle. Anchored with a Granite™ 1000 Video Control Center™, the Ford E350 extended cargo van is being used to cover high school sports and other events.

CreaTV is no stranger to Broadcast Pix. The public access station already has a Granite 1000 in its large studio, Slate 1000 in its smaller studio, and Slate Portable for remote shoots. In addition, it recently included Slate 500 systems as part of four portable production studios for San Jose schools as part of a grant project.

Justin Cowgill, director of facilities and technology, said the decision to purchase another Broadcast Pix system made sense from a training perspective, as he and his staff regularly train community volunteers to produce programs. However, with an integrated production system inside, it was also well equipped for the production van.

“It has so many features built into it that would take up more rack space, which means more real estate in the truck. Also, each tool costs money and is another potential point of failure,” Cowgill explained. “Space and weight were limited, and so was cost. Broadcast Pix really made it a much more affordable way to go.”

Since it hit the streets in 2011, the production van has been used mostly to record local high school football, though CreaTV has also produced coverage of roller derby, city meetings, and its own CreaTiVe Awards program. “Our setup and capabilities are extremely streamlined,” said Cowgill.

CreaTV makes extensive use of Granite’s Fluent™ workflow tools. The built-in Harris CG provides lower-thirds, scores, and sponsor graphics during sports coverage, while the Fluent Animation Store delivers transitions for instant replay. Fluent Clip Store is used for opens and bumps as well.

Four 24-inch monitors in the truck are fed using Fluent-View. CreaTV purchased the Quad Monitor option, so each of the 24-inch monitors can be configured to best serve the crew members at the TD, graphics, audio, and engineering stations. Cowgill recalled a shoot when one monitor was damaged, but he was able to compensate with Fluent-View. “It’s really easy to adjust based on your needs,” he said.

Designed and built by Magic Wave Productions, which is based in Pleasanton, Calif., the new production vehicle can accommodate up to five crew members. Beyond the Granite 1000, the van is also equipped with a Yamaha DM1000 audio console, Tightrope Media Systems ZEPLAY multi-channel instant replay, and two AJA Ki Pro recorders. Remote productions use three JVC GY-HM790U ProHD cameras, which are connected to the van via fiber.

After more than 20 shoots on location, Cowgill is very pleased with Granite 1000. “It’s fantastic,” he said. “The Broadcast Pix has served us well. We have a very solid system.”

About Broadcast Pix Broadcast Pix is a leader in live video production systems. Its Video Control Centers™ empower operators with patented techniques that combine cameras, clips and graphics to create compelling live video. The integration of a multi-format switcher, clip store, graphics system with a Harris or Chyron CG, and device controls provides the lowest cost of ownership at a fraction of the cost of a conventional control room to buy, staff and operate. Systems range from compact systems controlled by a touch-screen or voice-automation to sophisticated 2 M/E control panels. Customers include leading broadcast, corporate, education, religious, government, webcast, entertainment and mobile studios in more than 100 countries. Learn more at www.broadcastpix.com.

Broadcast Pix, Slate, Fluent, and Video Control Centers are trademarks of Broadcast Pix, Inc. Patented.

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NanoLumens “NanoBar” Brings Real-Time Twitter Feed To Ben & Jerry’s New Flagship Retail Store in Tokyo, Japan

Ben & Jerry’s has a long tradition of breaking ground with inventive new flavors and monikers for their world-famous ice cream, so when the company decided to open its very first retail location in Japan, it had to be an innovative store, complete with the company’s first digital menu boards and a live Twitter feed display.

With such a unique and specific purpose, the Twitter feed couldn’t be displayed on just any digital display or boring four-color LED ticker, it needed to really pop. That’s why they contacted NanoLumens to build them an 8-foot wide, 4.5-inch tall, full color 6mm pixel pitch LED display, unofficially dubbed the ‘NanoBar’.

According to Josh Byrd, NanoLumens Director of Marketing, “The ‘NanoBar’ LED display that we built for Ben & Jerry’s is a prime example of how NanoLumens can design and build an eye-catching, energy efficient LED display for literally any application.

“With our flexible and non-flexible displays that can be built to any size and shape, all a company needs to do is imagine a use for digital signage, and our team can make it a reality. By showcasing their live Twitter feed in the store on a vibrant full color ticker-type of display, Ben & Jerry’s has taken customer interaction to a whole new level, and NanoLumens is proud to provide the exact technology they need to do so.”

The ‘NanoBar’ display’s content is powered by software developed by Scala, which also provides content for the store’s digital menu boards behind the register counter.

NanoLumens displays are extremely slim, ultra-lightweight, energy efficient, and feature a seamless, edge-to-edge picture quality (up to a brightness of 5,000 nits) that can be viewed from any angle or any distance without color shift or picture drop-off. The company’s patented display technology, which allows customers to select from 4mm up to 10mm pixel pitch (depending on the model), promises to transform the way marketers engage their customers in every type of trade show, retail, hospitality, stadium, arena, transportation and public event environment.

NanoLumens displays are designed and engineered with the environment in mind, and consume significantly less energy per square foot than conventional digital displays. Further emphasizing their commitment to eco-friendly technology, NanoLumens displays are composed of up to 50 percent reclaimed materials, and are completely recyclable. What’s more, some NanoLumens displays can be serviced from the front, making maintenance easier than ever before possible.

Designed and assembled in the United States, NanoLumens displays are available in both flexible and fixed frames in five product lines: NanoFlex™, NanoFlex Wrap, and NanoFlex Ribbon flexible displays; NanoSlim™ fixed rectangular displays; and NanoShape™ fixed round, square, and triangular displays.

The company’s technology has been recognized by Entrepreneur magazine as a 2011 future-proof tech trend and was cited by The Wall Street Journal in its 2010 Technology Innovations Awards. NanoLumens’ technology also received the 2011 Breakthrough Technology of the Year Award at the American Technology Awards. Digital Signage Magazine awarded the NanoLumens NanoFlex a 2011 DIGI Award for “Best New Display Device – Non-LCD or Plasma.”

About NanoLumens:
Headquartered in Norcross, Georgia, NanoLumens, Inc. (www.nanolumens.com) is a privately held corporation engaged in the research, product development, marketing and sales of unique flexible and fixed displays that address a yawning technology gap in the $14 billion digital display industry. Since its founding in 2006, NanoLumens has built a portfolio of more than 20 international families of issued and filed patents on its flexible display technology that effectively address the commercial market void between relatively small flat-panel displays and huge, limited application LED boards. NanoLumens technology is not constrained by standard sizes and shapes, or by the weight, noise and cost issues traditionally associated with commercial LED products.

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WorldStage Supports Nicki Minaj Times Square Event Launching the Nokia Lumia 900 in North America

Times Square came to a standstill, and it wasn’t even New Year’s Eve. Ten of thousands of fans turned out to watch superstar singer-rapper Nicki Minaj perform live and celebrate the launch of the Windows-based Nokia Lumia 900 smartphone in North America at an event featuring audio and lighting support from WorldStage, the new brand for Scharff Weisberg and Video Applications Inc.

Minaj, a native New Yorker, sang a three-song set, then the show segued into an exclusive remix of her current hit “Starships,” performed live by DJ/producer Doorly. The remix was accompanied by the transformation of the American Eagle building on the corner adjacent to the stage, into a giant video screen with choreographed bold CG imagery.

“It was a large-scale, top secret project,” says senior account executive Michael May of the WorldStage Nashville office. “We got the call to put everything together five weeks prior to the event. We could only work in Times Square for the three nights prior to the show and couldn’t reveal the upcoming event to passersby” who were curious about the blue cube of a stage under construction.

IncrediBull, a brand communications company in London and San Francisco, conceived the event, which was shrouded in mystery until they put word out via social media, and Minaj fans quickly packed Times Square for the free concert.

Technical producer Doug Murray of Cue1Go production services in Larkspur, California assembled the players on the production team and selected WorldStage for its technical and logistical expertise. “Working in Times Square is never an easy feat,” notes WorldStage project manager Josh Perlman. “There are security issues, space concerns and, for this event, we could only work overnight.”

The audio needs for the event were extensive requiring sound coverage for a large area from the stage to 48th street plus Duffy Plaza. “We also needed to cover a very wide area with a digital intercom system – Broadway from 44th to 47th Streets,” Perlman points out. We brought in Tommy Nicks as the A1 for the project.

In addition to the PA and intercom package WorldStage supplied three WinVision 8mm LED walls to act as Countdown Clocks on the sides of the blue box stage. On the morning of the show they also furnished a pair of Christie Roadie HD30K projectors to display Nokia’s Twitter hash tag. Sean Kelly was the head LED tech and Juan Mateo was projectionist.

WorldStage also supported lighting designer Charles Foster, of Lightswitch, with fixtures for the performance. Lighting effects also made the blue stage glow for three days, building anticipation for the event. WorldStage provided a number of moving lights, including 25 Martin MAC Auras and 10 Clay Paky Sharpys; 75 LED fixtures, including 30 Chroma-Q Color Force LEDs; and a standard array of conventional lights and dimming. The show’s lighting was driven off a Martin M1 console.

Project manager John Healy handled the lighting end of the event and played host to the crew that traveled in from California to prep the show. “We had a crew of seasoned production electricians who split shifts around the clock to make the job happen,” says Healy. Our staff production electrician Drew Decorletto was one of the heads in the field.”

Atomic Design, a frequent WorldStage partner, provided the scenic and incorporated the LED Countdown Clocks into the set. Production Glue’s Matt Richman and Jack Hilley handled the technical direction and city permitting. Christine Smith of 22 Twelve was the executive producer.

“We’re proud that WorldStage met the challenges of scale, time frame and scheduling to support such a unique event in the heart of New York City,” says Michael May.

WorldStage Inc., the company created by the merger of Scharff Weisberg Inc and Video Applications Inc., continues a thirty-year legacy of providing clients the widest variety of entertainment technology coupled with conscientious and imaginative engineering services. WorldStage provides audio, video and lighting equipment and services to the event, theatrical, broadcast and brand experience markets nationally and internationally. The Owners and Employees of WorldStage believe that all clients deserve the WorldStage Experience

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AVFX-100-TR; Two (2) fiber VGA, Audio and RS-232 Extender

The VGA Extender, AVFX-100 enables integrated extension of Analog RGB video, audio and serial data interface up to 2km (6,600feet) over single-mode or 300m (985feet) over multi-mode fiber.

Designed for high speed transmission, it uses zero compression technology to deliver perfect graphic data transmission up to UXGA (1600 x 1200) at 60Hz refresh rate. It is designed to multiplex and de-multiplex RGB video, stereo audio, Display Data Channel (DDC) and serial data so as to be linked over two (2) LC fibers. It is compatible with DDC2B up to 100kHz clock speed.

AVFX-100 supports connecting serial data communication interfaces RS-232. Serial interface offers device to device and device to controller connections to build up to control system for A/V integration.

It also includes features such as an output for local monitor, rack-mount capability and real time system monitoring for easy installation.

It gives benefits of all-glass fiber transmission medium, data security, long distance extension up to 2km, easy plug and go installation and no RFI/EMI effects.

Key Features:
- Extends VGA, Audio and RS-232 with both single and multi-mode fiber.
(1) up to 2km (6,600feet) over two (2) single-mode fibers.
(2) up to 300m (985feet) over two (2) multi-mode fibers.
- Maintains high resolution of 1600 x 1200, 24bits colors with zero compression technology.
- Support Auto Tuning mode to refine display quality.
- Complies with DDC2B up to 100kHz of clock speed.
- Provides loop through output in transmitter for a local monitoring.
- Supports RS-232.
- Supports analog stereo (3.5mm) standard jack.
- Offers LED indicators for status (Power, Video, Audio, Data) and Link Error.
- 1U half rack mountable.
- Input power: +5V 3A
- Dimension (WDH): 220 x 140 x 40mm
- Weight: 0.46kg

Applications:
- Control room
- Military / Aerospace
- Medical imaging

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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