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Archive for November, 2013

METRIC HALO JUMPS ON ECLECTIC FUMUJ RELEASE

PARIS, FRANCE: The French band Fumuj blends elements of hip-hop, dub, electronica, and – in the words of co-founder, sound designer, engineer, and drummer Romain Pasquier – “loud music” on their fourth studio effort FUMUJ – Eponym Album. The five-song EP surveys the eclectic content of Fumuj’s prior work and reframes it with an urgency and intensity that suggests a band that has matured into form. Beyond its genre-bending take on composition and style, Fumuj is also known for its unique and vibrant sound, which is carefully curated by Pasquier. Metric Halo hardware and software figures prominently in that sound: Fumuj and its members own one or more Metric Halo ULN-8s, ULN-2s, and 2882s, and most of Pasquier’s processing and mixing relies on Metric Halo MIO Console (the free routing and recording software that runs the interfaces) and Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip plug-in.

“The new EP is somewhere between Mogwai, Helmet, and Bill Laswell, I guess,” said Pasquier. “We had a lot of fun creating these songs because we felt free to do anything. There were no limits. We all love to deconstruct and reconstruct elements, playing on contrasts, and building something new and inspiring through that process.” Having equipment with the flexibility and reliability to let that process unfurl naturally and without interruption is essential, and after first discovering Metric Halo a few years back, Fumuj has enjoyed the inspiration that comes with a transparent workflow.

“In anticipation of our recording sessions, a friend lent us some high-end, customized preamps and some crazy mics,” said Pasquier. “They were fun to use, but at some point in the first day I decided to use the ULN-8 preamps because I wasn’t feeling very happy or confident about the sound we were getting. It was like I turned to the ULN-8 because I wanted to know what was actually going on in the new room we were using. I realized I just wanted that Metric Halo transparency! I can trust what I hear from the ULN-8, ULN-2, or 2882. There’s no compromise. The preamps are great, the converters are great, the DSP – including the 80-bit summing mixer – is great, and it all fits in one rack unit! We can recall the MIO Console for each song, which makes the workflow easy.”

Pasquier used the Metric Halo ChannelStrip 3 plug-in extensively on FUMUJ IV. “I love ChannelStrip because the equalization and compression can be so subtle,” he said. “It’s very painless to use, and the newly-integrated spectrum analyzer makes it easy to see where adjustments will be most effective. I know it’s a small thing, but I’m also grateful for the ability to resize ChannelStrip 3.” In addition to his work with Fumuj, Pasquier also uses ChannelStrip and his Metric Halo hardware to do freelance work in Paris, which gives him an authentic sound that sets his work apart from engineers that use run of the mill equipment.

Fumuj’s FOH engineer, Alain Lesparat, recently purchased two Metric Halo 2882 interfaces and is now using them with Apple MainStage as a virtual effects rack and as an archive recorder for all shows. Although Pasquier has used his ULN-8 together with Ableton Live and the band’s hardware synthesizers, he looks forward to acquiring another 2882 or LIO-8 to dedicate to the live rig. “I can’t live with the ULN-8 in the rack on the days off,” he laughed. When asked what makes Metric Halo interfaces so useful for Fumuj’s live applications, Pasquier cited “a fat, open sound” and the tremendous flexibility of MIO Console. In addition, he said, “They’re also completely reliable. They just work, period. All the other members of Fumuj now have a ULN-2, and they aren’t engineers! They would have no patience for bugs or latency. With Metric Halo, they can simply make music.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

API APPOINTS STUDIO CONNECTIONS AS AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR

NUNAWADING, AUSTRALIA: API proudly announces the appointment of its new Australian distributor, Studio Connections for both API modules and 1608 console sales. Studio Connections has been a dominant player in the Australian pro audio market for over twenty years, and has recently completed relocation to its new facility in the Melbourne suburb of Nunawading. The new location is designed with the professional in mind, and prominently features a 1608 demonstration room, offering pros hands-on experience with the console and other API gear.

“Our new facility is fabulous and funky,” said Studio Connection’s Managing Director, Deb Sloss. “We intend to be a relaxed and welcoming space where customers can drop in for a coffee, a chat, and be able to experience all the great gear from API, including our own fully-operational 1608 console.”

Studio Connection’s longstanding association with the finest audio manufacturers highlights their commitment to the Australian pro audio market. Working closely with their network of dealers, the staff at Studio Connections pride themselves on customer service and are eager to expand the API presence in Australia. “We have witnessed an unprecedented level of interest in API products from our dealers and end users alike,” said Sloss. “API carries a rich heritage of extremely high-quality audio products and consoles. It’s been extremely gratifying to receive such wonderful support and endorsement from this appointment.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS 12X8 DANTE NETWORKED AUDIO DSP DELIVERS PRESENT AND FUTURE AUDIO EXPANSION FOR WISCONSIN HIGH SCHOOL

JACKSON, WISCONSIN: Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School serves over four hundred students from in and around Jackson, Wisconsin, a town 45-minutes northwest of Milwaukee. In the last decade, the school has expanded its facilities, and the crowning jewel of that expansion is the 750-seat Performing Arts Center. The center includes facilities for the school’s choirs, bands, and theatrical productions, as well as a state-of-the-art venue for Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School and other area schools and artistic organizations. Because funds were limited, the school asked Professional Audio Designs of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin to build a cost-effective sound reinforcement system that could start with simple coverage for Sunday services and have the ability to scale up to handle full theatrical productions as the funds became available. To accommodate that challenging request, Professional Audio Designs built the system around the Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 Dante Network Audio DSP.

“At the outset, the money allocated to the sound reinforcement system was generous, but the building itself ran way over budget,” explained Kim Leonard, president of Professional Audio Designs. “They came back to us and asked us to pare down the sound reinforcement system initially, while at the same time laying the foundation for the more expansive system that they will eventually have. That future vision includes a full-sized mixing console, dozens of mics and inputs, and a full stage monitoring system. But for now, they have a modest four microphones and a line-level input. We’re using the SymNet Radius 12×8 to auto-mix them.”

With the core system now in place, Fulcrum Acoustics loudspeakers powered by QSC amplifiers provide high-impact, high-fidelity coverage of the auditorium’s seating area. Three Symetrix Radius 12x8s provide the modest processing needed for basic sound reinforcement and will go on to provide the more advanced processing necessary. A Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote control gives users simple and intuitive control of volume for all four microphones, volume control for the line level input, and an overall master volume control.

When they get the funds, the school can simply plug in the digital mixer, the assisted listening system (ALS is installed now), the online streaming system, and a back stage monitoring system. Additional Symetrix ARC-2e units in the control room, in the house, and on a future portable backstage paging rack complete the system. Importantly, the simple quick-mix system that is already in place is selectable from the main ARC-2e so that the school and church can hold simple events and services without requiring an audio technician on hand.

“The whole system is networked via Dante,” said Leonard. “We built a primary network and a secondary network for backup. We’re glad Symetrix is leading the charge with fully-integrated Dante technology. It’s extremely cost-effective and robust and the fidelity is excellent. In addition, we always use Symetrix with Fulcrum loudspeakers because the FIR filters required by Fulcrum are fully supported within the SymNet software.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

SYMETRIX SYMNET EDGE AND RADIUS DSPs HANDLE PERFORMING ARTS CENTERS IN HOUSTON’S KATY SCHOOL DISTRICT

HOUSTON, TEXAS: The rapidly growing Katy Independent School District serves over 65,000 students in the greater Houston area. To meet their growing audio and visual media demands, school officials recently earmarked funds to update the performing arts center A/V systems in four of its seven high schools. Broadcast Works of Tyler, Texas was contracted to do the installation and used SymNet Edge and Radius AEC open architecture Dante network audio DSPs.

“The old A/V systems were 1990s vintage and entirely analog,” explained Aaron Comer, project manager with Broadcast Works. “The system designer, Erich Friend of Teqniqal Systems assessed their existing systems and determined that they could transform the performing arts centers from outdated to cutting-edge by revamping only the front end and control systems. The existing QSC amplifiers and Renkus-Heinz loudspeakers were basically in excellent shape.”

Although the original design called for another DSP manufacturer, Comer and his team lobbied hard for SymNet Edge and Radius DSP. “We had worked with this other manufacturer’s products in the past, and it was always a challenge,” he said. “In contrast, we’ve done a lot of Symetrix jobs, and they always go well. Ryan Curtright, Symetrix’ senior technical sales engineer, worked with us to put a nice package together centered on SymNet solutions. Based on our past experience, we knew it would work well and reliably… and would save the district some money.” The new systems make use of the Dante network’s stability and flexibility to send signal long distances without copper and provide digital patch bays that allow users (including first-year students) to select among each stage’s 70+ inputs for allocation to a 48-channel Avid SC48 console.

Stage inputs include a multitude of wired input plates together with a portable rack feeding a SymNet Edge and SymNet xIn12 expander. Rather than home running all of the stage inputs back to the sound booth, as in the old design, the new system uses a stage-located SymNet Radius AEC to collect them for transfer to the sound booth via Dante. That same Radius AEC, together with a SymNet xOut12 expander, receives the final house mix from the sound booth (again via Dante) for output to the stage-located amp rack. The portable SymNet Edge rack pairs up with a sixteen-count wireless microphone system or an additional twelve-count hardwired microphone collection and can connect to the system via any one of four Dante ports located around the stage.

Each sound booth contains three SymNet Radius AEC units with additional input cards, three SymNet xIn12s, and three SymNet xOut12s. Broadcast Works designed a custom computer interface using Symetrix’ SymVue software that allows users to connect any input source to any channel on the Avid SC48 console. In turn, the console outputs thirty-two channels that feed back into the SymNet system for transfer to the amp rack via Dante. “The students love it,” said Comer. “We trained a group of freshmen who had zero experience with a system like this. Within a couple of hours, they were completely comfortable and playing with the whole thing. Despite its complexity from our perspective, SymVue makes it simple from their perspective. They get it.”

For less elaborate events, Broadcast Works gave each school an iPad outfitted with Crestron control that would allow them to turn the system on with a minimal number of commonly-used microphones and input sources. The iPad gives them control over which commonly-used inputs are active, their individual volumes, and the overall volume.

The new systems’ easy learning curve made it possible for the theater and music departments in all four schools to start production on fall programs without delay. A few of the highlights include The Wizard of Oz, a Masquerade Serenade concert, and a play called The Cherry Orchard.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

DANLEY SOUND LABS LOUDSPEAKERS AND SUBS CONTRIBUTE TO TRUE STEREO IMAGING AT FIRST FREE CHURCH

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS: First Free Church has been a cornerstone of spiritual life in Rockford, Illinois since 1884. Over the decades, First Free has occupied several buildings of ever-growing size and, since the advent of A/V technology, ever-growing technical sophistication. Its current sanctuary seats close to 1,800 congregants in an arc spanning nearly 180 degrees, with a balcony and under-balcony area that stretches from wall to wall. Tired of poor coverage from a faux-LCR system of mid-1990s vintage, First Free hired SVL Productions of nearby Cherry Valley, Illinois to build a new system that would provide nearly every seat with crisp stereo imaging. Of course, this would be no small feat to achieve. SVL Productions turned to Chicago-based Johnson AV Engineering to help design and commission the new system, which relies on the tight pattern control of Danley Sound Labs loudspeakers to meet – and then greatly exceed – the church’s expectations.

“Music is a vital component of First Free’s services,” said Aaron Johnson, president and principle engineer at Johnson AV Engineering. “The old system had three clusters to cover different wedges of the room’s wide arc, but despite the fact that they were set up as a Left-Center-Right system, none of the seats had any true imaging to speak of. The church wanted true imaging, where each instrument seems to emanate from the empty space between the loudspeakers, but that’s very hard to achieve in such a wide arc. You can’t simply place a couple of clusters on either side of the stage and expect even coverage and convincing imaging. The relative volume and time delay of each loudspeaker at the listener’s location have to be nearly equal to make the stereo effect work.”

The solution was to divide the room into three 60-degree wedges, each of which would receive its own stereo image. Although that’s easy to conceptualize, it’s very difficult to actually implement because almost all loudspeakers spill energy “off-axis.” That spillover would cross the dividing line between one wedge and the next and destroy the stereo imaging effect. “Danley’s tight pattern control made it the obvious choice for this application,” said Johnson. “No other loudspeaker manufacturer comes close to Danley’s razor-sharp pattern control, which extends even to lower frequencies.”

Because of their specific coverage patterns and the geometry of the room, Johnson specified a Danley SH-60 on top of a Danley SM-96 at each loudspeaker location for coverage of the main seating area. A total of six such clusters comprise the main system: three sets of left and right. Four monophonic Danley SH-Micros provide front fill for seats very near the stage. Partitions separate six under-balcony areas, four of which seat thirty to forty each and two of which seat only eight. For the larger partitions, a stereo pair of Danley SH-Micros deliver convincing stereo imaging, whereas a single Danley SH-Micro in each of the smaller partitions deliver a monophonic summed signal.

“I don’t know of another loudspeaker that can achieve the kind of pattern control that Danley has managed,” said Brent Hayes, president of SVL Productions. “Aaron and I walked the room during commissioning, and it was truly astounding to step just past the edge of one loudspeaker’s pattern. It fell off immediately. One more step and we were clearly into the pattern of the next loudspeaker. I remember seeing it on paper, but it’s a whole other thing to experience it.” Johnson agreed: “I love that Danley products always model exactly like they work, and they work exactly as you expect them to.”

But the miracles of great pattern control don’t stop with the loudspeakers at First Free Church. Johnson designed a directional subwoofer cluster comprised of three Danley TH-118s flown near the ceiling, just in front of the stage. By paying careful attention to each unit’s phase and signal delay, the bass volume on stage is a full 18 dB lower than it is in the seats, which is an obvious and significant difference. The dividing line is, in Johnson’s words, “like a curtain,” and even the first row of seats is fully immersed in bass. By keeping so much low-frequency energy off the stage, the sound quality captured on stage by open microphones is much better and far less likely to growl or feed back.

Processing support for the new system is extensive, as proper alignment required a separate processing channel for almost every individual loudspeaker and subwoofer. BiAmp Audia provides that fine-scale level of control. Because the Danley loudspeakers and subwoofers require only a single amplifier channel, the total number of amplifiers was kept to a minimum, but the sheer number of loudspeakers and subwoofers involved still amounted to an impressive 26 channels. Powersoft K-Series and Ottocanali-Series amplifiers provide that power. “The new system requires more power to the loudspeakers and subs than the old system did, but the efficiency of the Powersoft units allow us to draw less AC power!” said Hayes. “As a result, we didn’t have to call in an electrician. Moreover, their physical compactness left an entire rack from the previous installation wide open. In summary, we had more processing channels, more amplifier channels, and more loudspeaker power, but less current draw and less space consumed.”

New video projectors and screens, together with a new high-end Chauvet lekos and LED lights completed the installation.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

GRUNDORF CORPORATION ANNOUNCES NEW WEBSITES

Council Bluffs, IA – November 2013… Grundorf Corporation, a leading manufacturer of equipment for musicians and audio professionals, is pleased to announce the debut of two new websites—one for the division that sells cases and accessories (Grundorf) and the other for the division that sells loudspeakers, audio processors, and related equipment (Grund Audio Design). The two website URL’s are www.grundorf.com (cases / accessories) and www.GrundAudio.com (loudspeakers / processors). more

JVC Introduces Cost Effective, Full HD VN-H557U Indoor PTZ Security Camera

WAYNE, NJ – JVC Professional Products Company, a division of JVC Americas Corp., today announced the VN-H557U network HD indoor PTZ dome camera, a cost effective, ONVIF Profile S-compliant unit equipped with a wide angle zoom lens (6.3-63.3mm) for excellent area coverage and Easy Day/Night functionality for 24-hour surveillance.

With its 2 megapixel CMOS imager, the VN-H557U delivers 1920×1080 full HD resolution, while its Super LoLux HD™ technology provides superior low-light color reproduction. The built-in lens includes 10x optical zoom and 10x digital zoom with automatic or manual iris control. The security camera also offers 350-degree, non-endless pan/tilt, along with 100 preset positions, auto return, auto flip, and auto pan.

“The new VN-H557U provides very wide, full HD imagery and automatic day/night performance at a very attractive price point,” said John Grabowski, national sales and marketing manager, JVC Security Division. “We designed the camera for a variety of applications, so it’s a great choice for casinos, airports, schools, offices, and retail stores.”

A built-in SDHC card slot allows flexible local recording options. Other features include privacy mask for up to eight areas, motion detection, 3D digital noise reduction, alarm in/out, and two-way audio communication. Multi-codec support includes M-JPEG, H.264 Baseline Profile, and H.264 High Profile, and the camera is compatible with third-party VMS products such as Exacq Technologies and Video Insight. Power options include power over Ethernet (PoE), plus 24V AC or 12V DC.

The VN-H557U has a suggested list price of $1,475 and will be available this month.

ABOUT JVC PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS

JVC Professional Products Company, located in Wayne, New Jersey, is a division of JVC Americas Corp., a wholly-owned subsidiary of JVC Kenwood Corporation, and a leading supplier of IP network and analog security cameras and monitors for the video security industry. Its V.Networks product line of has earned a solid reputation for quality and reliability, and provides superior picture quality for thousands of installations worldwide. For more information about this, or any other JVC professional product, contact JVC at (800) 582-5825 or visit JVC’s Web site at http://pro.jvc.com.

Meyer Sound Gives Houston Airport Terminal B the Self-Powered Advantage

At the new Terminal B at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH), a self-powered 48 V Meyer Sound loudspeaker system in the south concourse has raised the bar for audio fidelity and flexibility. Despite large reflective surfaces and tall ceilings, announcements and music are projected with a crispy clarity rarely heard in transportation facilities.

“The audio quality, intelligibility, and uniformity of coverage are distinctly better than most terminals across the country,” says Ulf Lueders, Terminal Services group manager of the Houston Airport System (HAS). “With this upgrade, travelers can enjoy the various concessions without having to worry about missing a flight announcement. Higher quality also allows the concourse operator to choose from a wider variety of background music, without being restricted to the ‘elevator music’ compatible with lower fidelity systems.”

Both airport management and the concourse operator, United Airlines, worked to offer across-the-board improvements in traveler experience. Improving audio quality in the concourse proved a challenge, as the 27-foot high ceiling, the room’s large size, and the expansive glass area presented acoustical difficulties. To control unwanted reverberations, Houston-based HFP Acoustical Consultants designed both the room’s acoustical treatments and the Meyer Sound self-powered loudspeaker installation as a balanced, integral system.

“Self-powered loudspeakers, with amplification and signal processing inside the cabinet, provide inherently better audio reproduction,” explains HFP’s Bill Schuermann. “Without the transformers and long cable runs typical of airport systems, they provide flatter frequency and phase response, lower distortion, and extended bass. The result is remarkable intelligibility with a natural voice quality, and far superior musicality.”

The principal Meyer Sound system comprises 60 UPM-1XP 48 V loudspeakers, 44 MM-4XP self-powered loudspeakers, and two Stella-4C installation loudspeakers, with a Galileo® loudspeaker management system with seven Galileo 408 processors providing system optimization. LD Systems of Houston installed the system.

“If conventional systems have to be rezoned to accommodate a new floor plan, you usually have to change wiring in the ceiling,” Schuermann explains. “But with self-powered systems, all the changes can be quickly accomplished inside the equipment room.”

“We’ve raised the bar with Terminal B south,” says Lueders. “It is certainly the airport’s prime location as far as audio quality and coverage is concerned.”

IAH Terminal B south concourse was designed by Cheryl Gajeske and Ivan Pire of Houston-based PGAL. The $97 million project opened in 2013 with 15 active gates for United Express regional flights, with expansion to 30 gates planned by the end of the year.

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Meyer Sound Assumes Canadian Sales Distribution and Hires Franck-Olivier Fabry as Sales Manager

To further strengthen its support for Canadian customers, Meyer Sound has assumed distribution responsibilities for Canada and appointed Franck-Olivier Fabry as the new sales manager. Working closely with the Berkeley, Calif. headquarters, Fabry is tasked with supporting the Canadian customer network by facilitating sales, technical assistance, and design services.

Fluent in both English and French, Fabry comes to his new post with over 14 years of experience in pro audio sales, much of it in the Canadian market. For 12 years, he held top-level sales positions at Bosch Security Systems (previously Telex Communications), where he handled sales for lines such as Electro-Voice, Dynacord, Midas, Klark Technik, and Bosch in Canada, the United States, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East. Fabry also directed global sales efforts at Williams Sound.

GerrAudio was formerly the Canadian distributor for Meyer Sound. “We are grateful for the dedication and hard work of GerrAudio in the past 25 years,” says Antonio Zacarias, Meyer Sound’s vice president of worldwide sales. “As Meyer Sound takes over Canadian distribution and with Franck’s wealth of industry experience, we are in a great position to build upon our momentum in Canada and provide customers with more direct access to our full range of services.”

“Meyer Sound’s product quality is respected worldwide, and no other company provides customers with such a high level of comprehensive support,” says Fabry. “I believe that success comes naturally when we’re enthusiastic about what we do, and I look forward to bringing new energy and passion to serving the company’s Canadian customers and consultants.”

Born in Paris to French and Swiss parents, Fabry lived in both countries before moving to the United States. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business from France’s Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Toulon and the University of Aix-en-Provence, respectively.

Fabry will be based out of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area. He can be reached at ffabry@meyersound.com or at +1.855.641.3288.

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Michigan’s NCG Eastwood Cinemas Installs Meyer Sound System for “Xtreme” Screen

The 18-screen multiplex NCG Eastwood Cinemas in Lansing, Mich. has selected a Meyer Sound cinema loudspeaker system for its premium “Xtreme” screening room.

“It’s an amazing sound system,” says Mark Henning, chief operating officer for NCG Cinemas. “In a recent trailer, the explosions and gunshot effects—with sound going from one corner to another—were just phenomenal. I also remember a scene from ‘The Hobbit’ inside a cave, with footsteps in water and water dripping from the walls. The clarity and detail were astonishing.”

The installation comprises three Acheron® 100 and three Acheron LF screen channel loudspeakers, 10 X-800C cinema subwoofers and 26 HMS-10 cinema surround loudspeakers. The system is driven and optimized by a Galileo® loudspeaker management system with three Galileo 616 processors.

Ken Angst of Washington, Mich.-based Audio Imaging Specialists served as system integrator. “They were looking for the highest quality audio, and I knew that Meyer Sound’s self-powered technology makes a substantial difference,” says Angst. “It sounds absolutely awesome in that room. It was an honor to put it together.”

The Eastwood audio system was pre-wired for its future implementation of the Dolby Atmos format.

The “Xtreme” screening room was built from the ground up as an addition to Eastwood’s existing 18-screen complex. In addition to the Meyer Sound system, the room features a Christie digital projector, a 74-foot wide screen, a RealD 3D system, and premium seating—including a number of reclining love seats.

“The Meyer Sound audio quality certainly is impressive, and our customers have noticed the difference,” says Henning. “Without question, along with the screen and the seating, it completes our full ‘Xtreme’ movie-going experience.”

Headquartered in Owosso, Mich., NCG Cinemas operates 14 theatres with a total of 137 screens, primarily in smaller cities and metropolitan suburbs in Michigan, Georgia, Tennessee, and Indiana.

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