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Archive by David Steinberg

Lighting Designer Ira Levy Selects Clay Paky Fixtures for H&M Flagship Store in Times Square

When Swedish retail giant H&M opened its newest US flagship store in Times Square, lighting designer Ira Levy selected Clay Paky Sharpy and A.leda Wash K10 LED-based lights to enhance the store’s futuristic, high-tech look. A.C.T Lighting is the exclusive distributor of Clay Paky fixtures in North America.

The H&M Times Square branch encompasses 42,000 square feet and has a number of tech-savvy features, including a mezzanine with Social Media Lounge, 7,000 square feet of LED screens, a 53-foot glitter wall, interactive mannequins and a virtual runway for shoppers. Lady Gaga cut the ribbon to open the new store and spent time with 20 lucky shoppers who had waited overnight in line for the privilege of being the first through the doors.

“The idea was for the store to appear as if shoppers were coming to a New Year’s Eve party 24 hours a day,” says Ira Levy who heads New York City-based Levy Lighting | NYC. “The flagship store is located across from where the ball drops on New Year’s Eve, and it has a club environment with lots of glitter and reflective surfaces. We use moving lights to add energy to the retail experience and shoot the lights against all the reflective surfaces, almost like a stylized mirror ball.”

Levy has employed Sharpys and A.ledas in the space. “The ceiling height is about 60 feet, so we wanted to have a light that is able to punch through the ambient light in a highly-illuminated space. But we also needed to hit all the way to the ground floor. Sharpy gives me that,” he says.

Levy was also looking for a fixture “with a very long lamp life. We have scheduled maintenance four times a year based on calculating Sharpy’s lamp life,” he explains.

The A.leda Washes give Levy the option of color washes in that same area. “The zoom gives me a lot of range,” says Levy. “I’m able to have tight beams for long throws and wider beams to illuminate shorter distances. I wanted color out of an automated light and something that had a long maintenance life, and I get both from the A.ledas.”

The lighting designer reports that he’s been “very happy” with both fixtures, which are “working great” in the high-profile store. “I used to work with Clay Paky and know the quality and reliability of the units. A lot of companies make [moving light] fixtures, but I wanted top quality motors and have been happy with Clay Paky’s in the past. I’m very happy with their performance.”

Levy was also impressed with A.C.T Lighting’s customer service. “They’ve been great, really supportive with very good back up,” he reports. “A.C.T staff members have been very responsive to everything and always available to me. I’ve never had to wait for anything.”

Francesco Romagnoli, Clay Paky Area Manager for North and Latin America, commented, “The A.ledas and Sharpys work very well together in the H&M store and we’re honored to have been chosen to help illuminate this retail institution.”

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CRM Studios Gains Efficiency with HRS Control’s UDC AJA Gang Control

Dallas-based video production company CRM Studios is using HRS Control’s AJA Gang Control features for its popular Universal Device Controller Software (UDC) to gain efficiency working with AJA Ki Pro Rack recorders on Glenn Beck’s TheBlaze broadcast network, and CRM Studios other broadcast projects.

CRM Studios is located in the historic Las Colinas Studios, once a vacant soundstage where in the past many movies and TV shows were shot. The Studios have been rebranded and reinvigorated to Mercury Studios, home of The Glenn Beck Radio Show, The Glenn Beck Show, Pat N Stu Show, and The Dana Show. The Studios are now home to a bustling and intimate portfolio of media entities currently requiring 10+ hours of multiple camera shoots across 3+ stages. CRM Studios is a radio and TV broadcast partner to Beck’s giant news, information and opinion media organization. Other productions CRM Studios create include Your Health, GameStopTV, Dillards and many others.

“Because of the tremendous workflow and turnaround time we have always used AJA Ki-Pro recorders,” says Michael Murray, director of IT and Broadcast Engineering at CRM Studios. “As we’ve grown we’ve been adding record decks, new cameras and feeds – there are lots of new sources. Traditionally, we would have upgraded to a media asset management system. But we were looking for a temporary alternative to shorten the workflow from shooting to editing to play-out. The process needed to be sped up quite a bit.”

Murray explains that the Ki-Pro hard drives used to be removed and walked to the edit bays where the media would be transferred so everyone in post would have access to it. “Media can be transferred over a network, too, but that requires a lot of steps and is much more time consuming,” he notes.

Enter AJA Gang Control for UDC Software, which allows users to take control of the full family of AJA products from the UDC Software and any tablet-, touch- or web-enabled device. AJA introduced Murray to UDC when it showcased UDC in their booth at NAB last year.

Cost-effective UDC AJA Gang Control provides AJA product users with the features that have made UDC Software so popular across the board: Macros, Web Server, Scheduling, Variables and Logic. Five custom controller interfaces are available for software or web server control; downloadable Apple iPad and Windows tablet apps are free of charge and the software works on Android through the web browser.

USB button panel controllers can be added to the software, and rack mount button panels are also available as well as desktop and wall mount touch controllers.

Several features are tailored specifically to the AJA Ki Pro family. Start/stop records on multiple Ki Pros can be triggered with a press of a button or automated by time of day. Customers can get clip lists and playlist information from multiple Ki Pros and load clips and play multiple Ki Pros.

UDC Ki Pro File Management permits simultaneous file transfers over the network on multiple files across multiple Ki Pros. File transfers for archiving to local or network drives can be activated by a press of the button or via time of day with UDC scheduling.

UDC AJA Gang Control now permits CRM Studio to “schedule and automate the media offload” for TheBlaze. “It’s significantly faster than doing it over FireWire, and there’s less chance of damaging media in transit,” says Murray. “UDC automates all the steps to offload with just the hit of a button. With UDC software we can send the media files info right from the Ki Pro Recorder hard drive directly to near line editing storage. UDC automates what would have taken an operator multiple steps to do.”

Consequently, the product is proving to be “a huge time saver” for CRM Studios, Murray says. “It not only schedules and records but also manages the assets we own – and it is less expensive than other solutions.”

Murray gives kudos to HRS Control, which “has been great – they’re more than helpful with demos and customer support,” he says. “HRS went out of the way to address all of our questions. I’d recommend UDC AJA Gang Control to everyone!”

About HRS Control
High Resolution Systems known as HRS Control is a company with a strong systems engineering and applications background. Its founders have decades of experience in the audio visual rental and staging industry, broadcast applications, A/V installations and system design. This combined experience allows them to provide the highest possible quality solutions to its customers in the most efficient manner. For more information, visit www.hrscontrol.com.

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Excision Carves Out Unique Tour Experience with Support from Clay Paky Lighting Fixtures and grandMA2 Control

DJ and dubstep producer Excision, the champion of bass music and sensory overload, has begun his 2014 tour of the US and Canada with powerful Clay Paky A.leda B-EYE K20- LED-based moving lights, a cadre of Sharpys and grandMA2 lighting and laser control. A.C.T Lighting is the exclusive distributor of Clay Paky fixtures and MA Lighting in North America.

The Excision tour, featuring Dirtyphonics and ill.Gates, has been called a “virtual apocalypse of twisting and morphing sounds” that encompass a full range of genres. Excision is accompanied by a new 150,000-watt bass system from PK Audio and his Executioner video and light production.

The tour marks the first time that Light Action Productions has supplied B-EYEs, which have quickly become indispensible to lighting and laser designer Dave Hauss of Double Surface Designs LLC. “They’re my go-to light right now,” he says. “When I have to cut down the rig, B-EYE is always there. They are an all around great fixture, and artists love them. I wouldn’t spec anything else.”

Scott Humphrey with Light Action, says, “There’s nothing else like the B-EYE out right now. It’s a multi-event unit and great for electronic music. Some of its macros are great, and it gives a new take on retro effects.”

Hauss says the overall lighting design for the tour “is different every day based on the specifics of all kinds of venues; we play rooms for 1,000 to 10,000 people. It’s very city-to-city, and we have to ramp up and down. The continuing challenges are trim heights, width and weight capacity. I need to go in each day and adapt. That means I’m programming every day of the tour. What’s so great about the Clay Paky fixtures is that I have almost as many designs as venues. This tour is one of the most unique experiences I’ve ever had.”

Hauss deploys eight B-EYEs “for everything from an incredibly bright wash for the openers to effects lights for the show. The entire show is projection mapped, and we needed fixtures that wouldn’t get lost. I use the B-EYEs in their shaper mode: splitting up the beam and dispersing the light is a great way to make it stand out. We can even take out the downstage truss because of the low trim. I like their color temperature a lot, and their field is amazingly even.”

Hauss has 20 Clay Paky Sharpys supplied by Christie Lites, which he calls “critical to the show.” He notes that his biggest challenge is that “this is a video shows with very large set pieces with very bright images – 90 minutes of custom content. You don’t want very wide ambient light. Sharpy is sharp enough to give a great light show without blowing out all the video – it’s the only fixture that won’t impede the visuals yet delivers all kinds of tricks.”

The grandMA2 Light controls the lights, lasers and set pieces in the show. “The set has pneumatic windows with lights hidden in them,” Hauss explains. “Everything is DMX controlled and built for Excision to use live. So the artist sends MIDI commands to the grandMA2 to trigger the windows on the fly. Once he executes the set pieces I follow with the lighting – all through one grandMA2 with one NPU.” Hauss also serves as the grandMA2 programmer for the tour.

James Castaneda is the lighting tech for the tour and Dillion Butz and Cam McNeil of Beama Visual are the media server programmer and projectionist, respectively. The special effects vendor is Image Engineering. Brett Able is the tour manager.

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Intel Launches CES 2014 Pre-Conference Keynotes with Pedersen Media Group Receiving AV Support from WorldStage

When Intel was given the coveted first slot at the CES 2014 Pre-Conference Keynotes held in the Venetian Hotel Ballroom, Las Vegas, WorldStage was on hand to support Pedersen Media Group (PMG) by enhancing the core AV equipment package provided for all the keynoters and customizing the space to showcase the address by new Intel CEO Brian Krzanich.

WorldStage has worked with PMG on numerous Intel events in the past, including the Intel Developers Forum (IDF) and Intel’s International Sales & Marketing Conference (ISMC). In addition to the pre-conference keynote at this year’s CES, WorldStage also supported PMG with AV services for the joint McAfee/Intel Security customer experience at Delmonico’s.

The primary challenge of the keynote was limited access to the ballroom, which Intel shared with fellow keynoters Sony and Cisco. The ballroom’s core equipment package featured cameras, audio and projection gear that consisted of a widescreen rear projection center display and a pair of rear projection outboard displays.

To support Intel’s comprehensive vision of Computing, PMG’s Creative Director, Mark Pedersen, called for “an immersive, widescreen experience across the whole ballroom,” says WorldStage VP of production services and account manager Richard Bevan “So we used the center RP screen that was provided and brought in two FP projection surfaces per side to span the ballroom for seamless video playback, speaker support, demos and IMAG.” The screens were angled to follow the angle of the existing design creating a dynamic and dramatic display that spanned 175 feet. But scheduling logistics required moving those screen panels in and out a number of times before the keynote was delivered. Fabrication partner Communilux was instrumental in ensuring repeatable, consistent installation and line up of the screens each time.

“Since we were only allowed in the room for two set up and tech sessions and two rehearsals we had to roll in the screens on dolly carts then strike them afterwards so the other keynoters could use the standard package,” Bevan explains. “Three projectors overlapped each panel so every time we took the panels out and brought them in again, we had to constantly tweak projector alignment. If it was off by even a quarter of an inch it would have been critical.”

To maximize executive rehearsal time on site, WorldStage created “a complete duplicate set up in another ballroom, outputting Pandora to six monitors, so presenters could rehearse when they didn’t have access to the main ballroom” Bevan explains. “All programming and content files were loaded back and forth between the rehearsal room and the keynote ballroom over the course of six days.”

WorldStage furnished PMG with a Pandora system for multi-channel playback and a Vista Systems Spyder image processor for the screen switching. Eleven confidence monitors, consisting of thin-bezel NEC monitors, were installed in the keynote ballroom and in the rehearsal space to show the widescreen content, notes and demos.

The content featured a lot of “wow moments,” according to Bevan, including a stunning opening video that required a seamless blend of three 5K live action sources and 3D animation. Demoes spotlighted future technologies such as a chip with a miniature Pentium computer with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi that can be embedded in any device or piece of clothing; a wireless charging bowl; a smartwatch with geotracking; and a flying whale that came alive for an amazed audience of 5,000.

For the latter Leviathan Project, based on the child’s storybook about a whale airship, PMG created the ultimate immersive storytelling experience with Intel-collaborating with the USC World Building Media Lab. To bring a 60-ton whale to life above the heads of the audience, six HD camera feeds created the basis for the live feed onto which the “smart” 3D animation of the whale was layered. This augmented reality, created by the Intel and USC whizzes, was so seamless in appearance on tablets used by audience members and the web feed that many tried to reach out and touch it. WorldStage provided all the camera equipment to support the experience.

At CES WorldStage also partnered with the Taylor Group to support the Intel booth at the Las Vegas Convention Center and with Plumbago for the Intel press event at the Mandalay Bay Hotel.

At WorldStage Jack Dussault was project manager, Terry Nakamura projection supervisor, Jason Spencer the Spyder operator, Raul Herrera the Pandora operator and Jeff Gibson video engineer. PMG’s event producer was Rick Voigt. TPN provided the base equipment package for all the keynoters at the Venetian.

WorldStage Inc., the company created by the merger of Scharff Weisberg Inc and Video Applications Inc, continues a thirty-year legacy of providing clients the widest variety of entertainment technology coupled with conscientious and imaginative engineering services. WorldStage provides audio, video and lighting equipment and services to the event, theatrical, broadcast and brand experience markets nationally and internationally.

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OneRepublic Wraps Its “Native” World Tour with Clay Paky B-EYEs, and Sharpys

OneRepublic’s headlining “Native Tour” wraps in the UK March 24 after spending last year circling the globe and breaking new ground as the first tour to utilize Clay Paky’s A.leda B-EYE K20 innovative, LED-based moving lights. A complement of Clay Paky Sharpys was also on hand.

The American pop rock band toured Europe, North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand last year in support of its third studio album, “Native.” OneRepublic’s tour has continued in 2014 with more dates in Europe and the UK.

On this final leg of the tour lighting designer Chris Lisle has carried over a diamond-shaped theme from last year, which features trusses, video screens and even some of the same fixtures. “The show has some big visual moments, so I had to come up with a design to meet that need,” he says. “The band likes cutting edge, so using the latest technology is important to us.”

Programmer Scott Chmielewski notes that, “Chris always designs his projects with the artist in mind and tries to keep the focus on the music. It’s important for him to make sure that the technology doesn’t overshadow the talent but still has the capabilities he needs. This has been a very technology-heavy show, but it was used tastefully and was well in control.”

Lisle was introduced to the B-EYEs at LDI and “knowing the feel that the band wants in their show, it was a no-brainer to use them,” he reports. “We used all 12 upstage on the diamond pods, both floor and flown, and facing directly out toward the audience. They have so many tricks up their sleeves that I think we used them at just 50 percent of their capacity.”

He notes that the band was “amazed” to see the new B-EYE fixtures during rehearsals and immediately asked what they were. Chmielewski says, “these guys have been around the world over and over again on countless shows and stages so you’d expect them to look past new toys like this. But not this time!”

Lisle explains that he let “the fixture show itself off gradually throughout the show. First it was just a wash light, then we added a couple of ‘inner/outer’ ring tricks, then a couple of ring chases, and ultimately the lens spin tricks toward the end of the show.”

Chmielewski likens the B-EYEs to a “firecracker – knowing that the fuse is always lit and about to go off. For a portion of the show they were used as typical wash lights, but we were able to mimic the effect of every kind of traditional fixture from big to small and use the entire bag of tricks a programmer has with color, dimming and pan/tilt effects. Plus, they added an entirely new set of looks that were quite literally the first of their kind. As a programmer, I spent hours just exploring these new abilities and looks, and when we finally used them in the show they became the centerpiece of the design.”

Lisle says that two weeks into the final dates for the tour the B-EYEs were working “amazingly well” and proving to be “a very solid fixture.”

“Through marathon programming sessions they didn’t have a single issue, and we were really putting them through their paces,” Chmielewski adds. “I was surprised to see just how few moving parts were involved in creating whirlwinds of amazing effects.”

In addition to the B-EYES 30 Sharpys were an integral part of the lighting design since Day One, Lisle says. “I love the fact that they can punch through video intensity when needed. They also gave us some great beam/aerial effects. You can’t beat them for speed: They were super-fast for the ‘techno’ moments of the show.”

“The Sharpys were a perfect complement to the B-EYEs in the rig,” agrees Chmielewski. “It takes a lot of power to compete with the look and brightness of a Sharpy, but the B-EYEs held their own.”

Chmielewski programmed the tour on a grandMA2 light with three active NPUs. A back up grandMA2 light was also available on the road.

The equipment was supplied by Neg Earth, UK.

Francesco Romagnoli, Clay Paky Area Manager for North and Latin America, commented, “This is a very interesting tour visually and we’re proud to be a part of it. The B-EYEs have been a big hit since they were introduced and the One Republic tour is a great example of what the fixtures can achieve.”

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HRS Control Launches New Products at NAB 2014

HRS Control invites NAB 2014 attendees to drop by Booth SL 4707 in the Las Vegas Convention Center’s South Lower Hall where they can explore a number of new products and product upgrades designed to meet the needs of customers in all market segments from rental and staging to broadcast, corporate and houses of worship.

The HRS Control booth will include:
*New Recording Scheduler for UDC software
*New eTouch wall-mounted touch screens for the Embedded Control Server product line
*New bridge products for Embedded Control Server products

The record scheduler feature for UDC (Universal Device Control) Software is tailored to broadcast studios or production facilities using multi-channel video recorders. “It was a specific request from AJA Ki Pro users,” says Drew Taylor, director of sales and applications for HRS Control, “and will have its first formal showing at NAB 2014.”

UDC Recording Scheduler enables users to schedule recordings on each deck or record channel and see when records are blocked out. Users can assign names to each segment and take advantage of other UDC features, such as the ability to execute macros to other equipment at the start or end of a record.

The Recording Scheduler works with the AJA Ki Pro family as well as any other recording device supported in the UDC Software such as the PIX 260i from Sound Devices.

UDC Recording Scheduler is available for purchase now by contacting HRS Control. “The new feature is already being used by a major network affiliate’s studio as well as a house of worship,” Taylor reports.

Also making its NAB debut is the new eTouch series, a wall-mounted touch screen controller that works in conjunction with HRS Control’s Embedded Control Server series of products, including the Raptor for permanent AV installs.

“We’ve been moving more and more into commercial integration, and as we work with clients on projects in commercial spaces a common request has been for in-wall mount touch screens,” says Taylor. “Even though Raptor supports the HRS Control Pro iPad and Windows RT apps, people have been asking for a dedicated device performing this sole function. So we’re excited to introduce 4- and 7-inch eTouch controllers with wall mount and desktop options.”

The wall mount kit is available now with a desk mount kit to be announced soon.

Joining eTouch in the Embedded Control Server product line are three new bridge products – Lighting Bridge, Studio Bridge and Time Code Bridge – designed to work stand-alone or as part of a larger system with the Raptor.

“Customers using the protocol translation features of UDC Pro Plus and the custom GUI features of Raptor now have dedicated boxes to perform separate the functions,” Taylor explains. “It’s more cost effective since they’re not buying a full software package they may not need, and it allows them to allocate resources in other systems to specific functions for greater reliability and easier maintenance.”

When the Raptor provides the GUI, the bridges act as back-end workhorses linking external equipment for smooth communications.

The Lighting Bridge permits Art-Net connections with non-Art-Net-speaking devices, such as video switchers. The Studio Bridge translates PBUS, VDCP and Sony 9-pin protocol in broadcast environments enabling switchers to talk to equipment such as Vista Systems’ Spyder, AJA Ki Pro recorder and any other video wall processors, players, recorders and more. The Time Code Bridge listens to external time code so macros can be executed to control equipment via Time Code Triggers at user specified points in the Time Code.

Each of the bridges is one-half rack wide and a single rack high. Sharing its form factor with the Raptor, a bridge can sit side-by-side with the Raptor and occupy just a single rack height. The bridges are available to order now.

Visitors to the HRS Control booth at NAB will have a chance to see all of these new products in working demos by HRS Control staff, who will supply additional details and delivery information.

About HRS Control
High Resolution Systems known as HRS Control is a company with a strong systems engineering and applications background. Its founders have decades of experience in the audio visual rental and staging industry, broadcast applications, A/V installations and system design. This combined experience allows them to provide the highest possible quality solutions to its customers in the most efficient manner. For more information, visit www.hrscontrol.com.

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The Musical “Rocky” Makes Broadway Debut with d3

America’s inspirational underdog, boxer Rocky Balboa, comes to Broadway with the musical “Rocky” opening at the Winter Garden Theatre. Video designer Dan Scully chose a powerful d3 4U v. 2.5 media server from d3 Technologies to help tell the story of Rocky’s challenges and triumphs in the ring and out.

“There’s a nice rhythm to how video has been worked into the show,” says Scully who teamed with video designer Pablo Molina on the production. “We’ve tried very hard to be specific and precise in our cueing and use of image. I’ve used d3 before, and our video programmer, Ben Keightley, has six years experience with d3. I can’t imagine building the show on another system.”

Media is interwoven throughout Rocky’s iconic tale. A pair of 12′ x 10′ flying video walls function as a stand-in for media reports that track the upcoming championship fight. A pet shop scenic unit features 24 video monitor “fish tanks”. Rocky’s grueling training regimen is projected by an array of Christie and Panasonic projectors. “All the departments did a great job recreating the famous training montages from the movie,” Scully reports.

For Rocky’s final fight the production tears down the fourth wall and essentially turns the show into theater-in-the round, he says. Theatergoers in the first 8 rows of the orchestra move on stage, a large jumbotron-style screen appears with supporting flying video walls for IMAG.

Three d3 4U servers, provided by Sound Associates in Yonkers, New York, are currently used on the show; another is on hand as a hot-swappable back up unit. “The features I rely on most are automation tracking and projector 3D calibration,” says Scully. “We have a lot of scenery moving quickly throughout the show. We need a way to glue content to surfaces or have surfaces reveal content as it moves across the stage. I’m able to tell Ben to put this image on that wall as it tracks onstage, spins and moves upstage. The first time you see it it’s almost like magic.”

Keightley echoes Scully’s sentiments about d3′s ability to serve up media on a variety of displays, many of them in motion. “This show has a lot of architecture and infrastructure so we’re interfacing with a lot of different devices,” he says. “Knowing the exact state of each device at any given time is really important. I have to know that this machine is going to send content for that screen out of these outputs, and that the matrix will route content in a specific way for a particular scene. I have to be able to easily take stock of the status of close to two dozen outputs.”

Scully notes that, in his experience, “a lot of show and video playback systems give flexibility at the cost of complexity. But d3 offers all the flexibility I need with an interface that’s responsive and quick to use. Projection design used to move slower than other departments, but that’s no longer the case. It’s important for me to move at the speed of the rest of the production while still having the flexibility to do really complicated sequences. Half of that ability is due to d3 and the rest to Ben programming it: He can make the system move at speeds that are surprising for the complexity of what we’re doing.”

Keightley likes “how deftly” he can change outputs on the d3 system. “I send video to 16 display devices but I do it using only about half as many outputs because as soon as I go black I can instantly reroute the devices I’m sending video to.”

“The d3 system thinks like we think,” Scully points out. “It works like the tools we use to make content; I understand what’s going on because it looks like my video tools. d3 was built by people who use it so it operates like designers think not like software engineers think.”

He also gives kudos to d3′s “support and systems integration” for “Rocky.” “They made half a dozen different controls for us to use, including implementing the camera switcher, controlling the signals to the monitors and the matrix switching controls. This system isn’t just off-the-shelf computers. The d3 team stands by the product 110 percent, and it’s great to have that kind of support.”

Sarah Jakubasz is the associate video designer on “Rocky” with Greg Peeler video technician and Andrew Bauer video editor.

Based on the Academy Award-winning Best Picture, “Rocky” has been brought to Broadway by a five-time Tony Award-winning creative team, including director Alex Timbers, songwriters Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, and book writers Thomas Meehan and Sylvester Stallone.

About d3

d3 is the world’s first fully integrated visual production system for video professionals, combining a real-time 3D stage visualiser, timeline, video playback engine and projection mapping tools into one product. d3′s unique integrated workflow assists the designer at all stages of the project, from pitch through development to final delivery. For more information contact Judith Hornman at d3 Technologies: +44 207 234 9840 / judith.hornman@d3technologies.com

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Technology Day for Control Rooms and Collaboration Systems Announced for April 16th at Electrosonic’s Burbank Headquarters

Electrosonic has announced its Technology Day for Control Rooms and Collaboration Systems & Tools, a free event scheduled for April 16, from 11am to 5pm, at its Burbank, California, headquarters. Electrosonic, a leading AV design and systems integration company, has successfully hosted Technology Days for several years.

Electrosonic’s Technology Day will feature live technology demonstrations and informational sessions. Attendees will have the opportunity to experience the latest collaboration tools designed to improve productivity and save costs by enhancing remote/field access and communication. They will also learn about the latest control room technologies and discuss custom solutions with system designers and engineers.

Additional information can be found on the event page: www.electrosonic.com/tech-day-burbank.

“Our upcoming Technology Day gives attendees in the utilities, oil & gas and emergency services markets a chance to see the latest equipment, expand their knowledge and network with other professionals,” says Electrosonic’s Todd Miller, VP of Control Rooms. “It’s a real opportunity for close up, hands-on demos and one-on-one information sharing – the kind of experience that’s hard to find elsewhere.”

Technology Day attendees will see the newest visual collaboration and sharing tools, control room display technology and real-time network video streaming. Exhibitors at the event include: Cyviz, Jupiter Systems, Mitsubishi Electric, Extron, Barco, Russ Bassett Corporation and Telamon Corporation.

Informational sessions are also scheduled. Randy Pagnan of RP Visual Solutions will address “Visualization – Focus on Control Rooms and Immersive Applications,” and discuss current trends in control/command centers and control room display technology. Telamon Corporation’s Suzanne Beck will present “Value Added Partnerships,” a how-to guide to making and keeping partners that complement your business model with the goal of providing additional products and services to the end client.

Electrosonic VP of Control Rooms, Todd Miller, will also be on hand to lead a tour of the Electrosonic facility where the event is staged, including a visit to the new Network Operations Center (NOC) to view the company’s remote management capabilities. Miller will also give a presentation focusing on Electrosonic’s custom end-to-end solutions from system design through commissioning, maintenance and service.

Technology Day will feature hors d’oeuvres and raffle giveaways. Attendees may RSVP by visiting the event page at www.electrosonic.com/tech-day-burbank.

About Electrosonic
Electrosonic, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an international audio-visual company that creates tailored, state-of-the-art solutions for a wide range of markets including theme parks, museums, control rooms, and corporate meeting rooms. Since its founding in 1964, Electrosonic has built a strong reputation for working on complex projects, both large and small, and has developed lasting partnerships with customers and suppliers. Beyond complete integrated systems, Electrosonic provides a comprehensive scope of services including technical design, projector lamp sales, maintenance and operational support.

Learn more about Electrosonic. Visit http://www.electrosonic.com

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Vista Systems Spyders Start the Day Inside and Outside NBC’s “Today” Show

There are Spyders on the new set of NBC’s iconic “Today” show, and the image processors from Vista Systems play an important role in delivering the engaging visual look of the program to audiences nationwide. The first new set in seven years combines modern and homey vibes and showcases multiple high-resolution LED displays of various shapes and sizes. The redesigned set for Studio 1A skillfully unites the interior home base with fans and happenings outside in Rockefeller Plaza.

Three Spyder X20s drive LED displays provided by D3, a global technology company that designs, engineers and manufactures turnkey LED display and lighting solutions. Two Spyders, a main system and back up, are dedicated to the interior set where D3 has positioned a retractable 1.9mm high-resolution LED display at the studio’s main interview area; a curved 2.5mm high-resolution LED display above the anchor desk; a 2.5mm high resolution LED column display; and a modular 1.9mm high-resolution LED window display capable of separating into six different panels and rotating 180 degrees to face Rockefeller Plaza.

D3 had previously designed the custom LED video and ticker display system that wraps the entire corner of the studio’s glass-walled exterior. The 8×8-inch modules consist of over 1,000 6mm LED panels; one Spyder is devoted to this display, which serves as a dynamic backdrop for special events and show features-and showcases live video and text headlines.

“There are five display elements in the studio, and all are different sizes, resolutions and shapes including LEDs, microtiles and video walls,” said Meric Adriansen, managing partner at at D3. “They all need to be driven by a variety of different content: DVI signals, HDSDI signals. Spyder can configure all sources to all five displays. It’s the most flexible device for sizing, positioning and scaling the video and graphics.”

About Vista Systems
Vista Systems’ switchers have become the industry standard for live multiple-destination video and data mixed signal switching with real-time windowing and composition. For more information on Vista Systems, visit their website at www.vistasystems.net.

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Gemini Light Sound & Video Takes Delivery of Clay Paky Sharpy Wash Fixtures

Dallas-based Gemini Light Sound & Video has invested in 30 Clay Paky Sharpy Washes and plans to add more of the popular fixtures to its rental inventory. A.C.T Lighting is the exclusive distributor of Clay Paky lighting in North America.

Gemini Light Sound & Video is an equipment rental and sales company and one of the largest dealer in the southwestern U.S. Gemini owns the area’s biggest inventory of conventional and moving lights, consoles, high-end audio systems, projectors and switchers.

“We got 30 Sharpy Washes in our first order and will have more coming – I can’t keep them in stock,” says Gemini accounts and project manager Jason Cain. “Their size, speed, color saturation and output are second to none. The Sharpy Wash is an all-around great light. No wonder it’s in such demand. We’re the first in the southwest to have them.”

Gemini used 18 Sharpy Washes on the recent National Cheerleaders Association’s High School National Championships at the Dallas Convention Center, which was covered by CBS Sports. “They were a good choice for that event,” says Cain who served as lighting designer for the show. “You could zoom them in and get a tight beam. You get that Sharpy feel but can also blow them out and soften them up to get a good white light.”

Gemini placed the Sharpy Washes upstage where they provided front light for the entry of the cheerleaders and back light for their performances. “We also used them for flash-and-trash,” Cain reports. “We got bouncing colors, pan and tilt, and strobing. It was great!” He notes that “the trim was at 42 feet, and at that distance they had plenty of power.”

Following the cheerleading championship Gemini deployed Sharpy Washes on a number of corporate events and at shows featuring Grammy Award-winner Lorde at the Southside Ballroom in Dallas and in Houston.

Cain praises A.C.T Lighting for its “amazing” customer service even though he really hasn’t had to take advantage of it. “I know they would do anything to support us, but at this point everything is working perfectly!” he reports.

Francesco Romagnoli, Clay Paky Area Manager for North and Latin America, commented, “Gemini Light and Sound is a great company that serves a great market. We look forward to a long and growing relationship them.”

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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