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Archive by Hummingbird Media

Elevation Church Embraces Recent Sennheiser Endorsement, while Putting New Neumann KK 205 Microphone Capsules to the Test

Charlotte, NC – April 18, 2012: Recognized by Outreach Magazine as one of the fastest-growing churches in the United States, Elevation Church serves over 10,000 congregants each weekend and maintains six worship campuses — four of which are ‘portable.’ To keep pace with this growth, Elevation has had to establish itself on a solid technology footing and has maintained a strong relationship with Sennheiser since opening its doors in 2005. Recently, Elevation became an official Sennheiser endorsed worship facility and was among the first to put the new Neumann KK 205 capsules — which are designed for the Sennheiser 2000 series wireless transmitters — through their paces.

Brian Poole is technical director at Elevation Church and has worked closely with Sennheiser to ensure that the clarity and sonic integrity of the facility is all that it can be, no matter which campus congregants are attending. Recently, Elevation added five Neumann KK 205 microphone capsules to its arsenal of live performance and recording tools. Poole discusses how he has helped Elevation continue to deliver superior sound with Sennheiser and Neumann.

Can you describe some of the challenges that go along with the growth that Elevation has experienced?
We are six years old and have six campuses in the Charlotte area. All in all, we are running at about 10 or 11 thousand people every weekend. With that growth, there have been a lot of rapid changes we have had to make, especially considering that audio is a very big part of what we do. Sennheiser has been there for us the entire time and has provided the best product and support we could ask for — and even more so now that we are endorsed. A big challenge as a multi-campus church is ensuring that we will have gear that we know will be reliable and sound great. Four of our campuses are portable, so we are lugging gear in and out all weekend; when we plug it all in and turn it on, we know it is going to work. Sennheiser has also helped us through our RF coordination, which can be very complex.

How familiar are you with Neumann microphone capsules?
We have always loved Neumann microphones and already had the KK 105 capsules on our pastor’s [Steven Furtick] speaking mic with a Sennheiser SKM 5200 transmitter. Our pastor does a lot of singing as well, and the performance of the SKM 5200 / KK 105 combination has been fantastic. By making a Neumann capsule that works with an SKM 2000 transmitter is really a game changer for us. Now we can have Neumann sound not only for the pastor, but all our other lead singers and it is a very economical solution.

Tell me about your first impressions with the KK 205s.
We just received them three weeks ago, and they are already on our primary lead vocal microphones [used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 2000 handheld transmitters] at our two permanent campuses. One of these campuses is a warehouse with low ceilings, and the acoustics aren’t ideal. The KK 205 has a supercardioid pattern so we are able to get plenty of gain before feedback — this is huge for us because we like it loud and we like it to sound good. I was 100 percent comfortable that I could take the KK 205 right to the stage without going through weeks of rehearsals first.

For our Easter service, the new Neumann capsules went into our broadcast facility. We have a big spoken word element in our Easter service, and this is the first thing right out of the gate during our worship experience. All our main worship leaders were on the KK 205s and the feed went out to all six of our campuses. It was also put online for everyone to see and participate in. Everything worked out great and all the voices were very rich.

Do you intend to use the KK 205s in other applications?
We do a lot of recording both for CDs and streaming on our website. In fact, our worship band has just signed a pretty big record deal and we expect the KK 205s and the SKM 2000s will be used on future live recordings. Our first live album and live DVD was a big deal for us and it is very exciting that Sennheiser has released a ‘Neumann for the Masses,’ if you will.

How has your experience been with Sennheiser overall, including with the new Neumann KK 205s?
First of all, Sennheiser has rock solid RF and the sound quality is best of the best. We’ve got 36 channels in our auditorium of Sennheiser wireless and I’ve never had a single issue of anything dropping out. Now, with the KK 205s, we can put Neumann performance in the reach of all our singers, increasing the overall quality of our worship experience. Audio quality has always been an incredibly important component of worship for Elevation Church and the KK 205 capsules truly represent quality for the masses — the cost/performance ratio cannot be beat. All in all, our relationship with Sennheiser has been fantastic and we feel very blessed.

Caption:
Brad Hudson, Worship Leader at Elevation Church, uses a KK 205 on a SKM 2000 during Easter rehearsals at Elevation’s Blakeney campus.

Introducing a media control protocol for Sennheiser wireless systems

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 17, 2012– With the new firmware version 1.7.0, audio specialist Sennheiser [NAB booth C2632] is now providing a media control protocol for its 2000, evolution wireless ew 500 G3 and evolution wireless ew 300 G3 series. This new open protocol enables rack-mount devices of the series to communicate directly with media control units in an Ethernet network (UDP/IP) and to be integrated into larger audio/video control systems. The units can then be remote-controlled and monitored directly from a central control panel, such as those supplied by Crestron and AMX. Individual solutions from system providers or control via an Apple iPad/iPhone or a mixing console are equally possible.

“The new firmware enables microphone receivers and monitoring transmitters from the 2000, ew 300 G3 and ew 500 G3 series to be remote-controlled and monitored,” explained Robb Blumenreder, channel manager for professional systems at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. The user can display the channel banks of the rack-mount receivers and transmitters, remotely set a suitable frequency and also assign names. The receivers and transmitters can be muted via the control panel and give warning signals if, for example, the signal strength is too low or if the devices are threatening to over-amplify. “Put simply: this interface can be used to give all essential commands and to set up the system,” Blumenreder said.

For the receivers of the ew 300 G3, ew 500 G3 and 2000 series, the squelch, equalizer and audio signal strength can be displayed, as well as the RF field strength for each receiver unit within the device, the active antenna, pilot tone on/off and the battery status for the associated handheld or bodypack transmitters.

For the monitoring transmitters of the ew 300 IEM G3 and 2000 IEM series, the sensitivity, equalizer and mono/stereo setting can be displayed and adjusted. In addition, the transmitter indicates the audio signal level.

“Of course, even when integrated into a media control system, the rack-mount receivers and transmitters can still be operated and programmed directly at the units themselves,” Blumenreder explained. “The devices will then process the current control signal in each case.”

The new firmware version for the receivers and transmitters as well as the complete documentation for the media control protocol can be downloaded free of charge from the Sennheiser website: www.sennheiserusa.com/mediacontrolprotocol.

*iPad and iPod are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. in the USA and other countries

Image Caption:
Screenshot1+2.jpg: Microphone receivers and monitoring transmitters from Sennheiser’s 2000, ew 500 G3 and ew 300 G3 series can now communicate directly with media control units via an open protocol

Devices Supported

EM 300 G3 wireless microphone receiver
EM 500 G3 wireless microphone receiver
SR 300 IEM G3 monitoring transmitter
EM 2000 wireless microphone receiver
EM 2050 twin wireless microphone receiver
SR 2000 IEM monitoring transmitter
SR 2050 IEM twin monitoring transmitter

Neumann Introduces KK 204 and KK 205 Microphone Capsules, Designed to Complement Sennheiser’s 2000 Series Wireless Handheld Transmitter

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 16, 2012: Premium audio brand Neumann announced that it will be showcasing its new KK 204 and KK 205 microphone capsules at the Sennheiser booth [C2632] during NAB 2012. The new capsules, which are available in cardioid (KK 204) and supercardioid (KK 205) patterns, are compatible with Sennheiser’s 2000 series of wireless handheld transmitters.

The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Neumann, commented: “Neumann capsules have already been used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 5200 handheld transmitter for the past 10 years on some of the largest stages of the world, where the highest demands are placed on a high-resolution sound and transmission reliability. With the development of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads, the Neumann sound is now also available for the Sennheiser 2000 Series. The synergies between the key areas of expertise of Sennheiser handheld transmitters and Neumann capsule sound permit us to offer our customers a wireless system of absolutely uncompromisingly quality, even for the most demanding live applications.”

In developing the new capsules, particular importance was placed on the effective damping of pop sounds and handling noise, as well as on the extremely low level of self-noise. The KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads also have an extremely wide dynamic range and were designed to be very easy to service.

The aesthetic design complements the construction of the SKM 2000 handheld transmitter, and each capsule — like the SKM 2000 transmitter — is available in both nickel and black finishes. Each capsule includes a large nylon bag designed to hold the capsules, the handheld transmitter, battery packs and additional accessories.

    Both the KK 204 and KK 205 feature:

Reduced handling noise: Very low sensitivity to handling noise with a steep roll-off from approximately 78 Hz
Reduced plosives and sibilance: Both capsules feature a foam-lined grille to ensure smooth sound
Wide dynamic range with high SPL capability: 126 dB-A of dynamic range with 150 dB MAX SPL
Low feedback: Incredibly smooth and flat frequency response provided high gain before feedback
Easy to service components: Neumann understands the rigors of the road and has made the KK 204 and KK 205 exceptionally robust but easy to service if necessary

    Specifications:

Directional pattern: Cardioid (KK 204) / Super-cardioid (KK 205)
Frequency range: 40 Hz – 20 kHz
Sensitivity (at 1 kHz into 1 k?): 2.8 mV/Pa ± 1 dB
Equivalent noise level, CCIR1): 35 dB
Equivalent noise level, A-weighted1): 24 dB-A Max. SPL for 0.5% THD2) 150 dB
Dynamic range (A-weighted): >126 dB-A
Weight (including transmitter and power supply unit): Approx. 17.6 oz.
Dimensions (including SKM 2000)/length: 10.7 in., ø 2.2 in.

1) according to IEC 60268-1; CCIR-weighting according to CCIR 468-3, quasi peak; A-weighting according to IEC 61672-1, RMS
2) measured as equivalent el. input signal

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Related Topics: Microphones, News |

Sennheiser adds the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter to its evolution wireless series

Old Lyme, Conn.–April 16, 2012– Audio specialist Sennheiser is extending its evolution wireless ew 300 G3 series with the addition of the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter. Whether it is for a speaker’s podium or for fast mobile use in video productions, the SKP 300 G3 converts any conventional cabled microphone quickly and easily into a wireless version. The phantom power required by condenser microphones is also supplied by the rugged transmitter – a highly versatile device that enables cabled microphones to become wireless with ease.

“With the new SKP 300 G3, we are further expanding the application possibilities for the evolution wireless series,” explained Robb Blumenreder, channel manager for professional systems products at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “The plug-on transmitter comes with its own phantom power supply, enabling it to be combined with any microphone with an XLR-3 output.”

For applications in the Installed Sound sector, the plug-on transmitter can be combined with an EM 300 G3 rack-mount receiver, thus making it possible, for example, to have a speaker’s podium without the visual interference of cables or to implement mobile lecterns. For video journalists, the SKP 300 G3 is an ideal partner for the EK 100 G3 camera receiver.

The SKP 300 is powered by two AA batteries or the optional BA 2015 accupack. The plug-on transmitter is available in eight frequency ranges, and is quickly and easily synchronized with its receiver using an infrared link.

The SKP 300 will be available in April 2012.

Caption:
SKP 300.jpg: Wireless with ease: the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter with switchable phantom power turns cabled microphones into wireless ones in next to no time

Technical Data: SKP 300

Modulation wideband FM
Frequency ranges A: 516–558 MHz; G: 566–608; GB: 606–648 MHz;
B: 626–668 MHz; C: 734–776 MHz; D: 780–822 MHz;
E: 823-865 MHz

Frequency banks 20 frequency banks each with up to 24
intermodulation-free presets; 6 frequency banks
with up to 24 frequencies freely selectable by the user
in 25 kHz steps
(Please note that the EK 100 G3 camera receiver has
only twelve frequencies per channel bank)

Switching bandwidth 42 MHz
RF output power 10/30 mW
Nominal/peak deviation ±24 kHz/±48 kHz
Phantom power 48 V ± 2 V
Compander system HDX
Audio frequency response 80–18,000 Hz
THD 0.9%
Signal-to-noise ratio > 120 dBA (1 mV peak deviation)
Audio input XLR-3F, balanced
Power supply 2 AA batteries (1.5 V) or BA 2015 accupack
Operating time typ. 8 hrs (30 mW RF power, without P48)
Dimensions 105 x 43 x 43 mm
Weight with batteries 195 g

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Related Topics: Microphones, News |

Sennheiser to Host Series of Online Recording Sound Academy (RSA) Webinars between April and October

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 2, 2012 –Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that it will begin hosting a series of online webinars featuring Grammy-award winning engineers and producers this week. The webinars will teach attendees how to use various recording techniques aimed at achieving the best possible studio sound.

The first webinar, which will focus on EQ and compression techniques, will held free of charge this Thursday April 5th at 5:00 p.m. EDT as a special introductory offering to program participants. To register for this Online RSA, or learn about other upcoming webinars that will be taking place, please visit http://www.sennheiserusa.com/RSA.

Topic/Host
Avoiding Too Much Equalization and Compression, hosted by David Thoener, Grammy-winning producer/engineer (Santana, AC/DC).

When:
Thursday, April 5th at 5:00 p.m. EDT

Attendees will learn:

– How to use EQ constructively
– When to use compression—and when not to
– How to add the final sheen to the mix with gentle use of EQ

Sennheiser: Supporting Aspiring Producers/Engineers
The Online Recording Sound Academy borrows instructional elements from Sennheiser’s highly successful on-site Recording Sound Academy seminars, such as valuable tips and instruction on microphone selection and placement, recording and mixing techniques. The RSA webinars — which run between April and October — feature instruction by accomplished producers and engineers on a variety of recording topics, and also feature a thorough Q&A session with the instructor. Following is a summary of upcoming dates and topics:

May 3: Modern Compression Tactics
Hosted by Karl Richardson, nine-time Grammy-award-winning producer

June 13: Recording Vocals
Hosted by Tom Young, Grammy award-winning engineer

July 17: Mixing
Hosted by Tim Palmer, Grammy-nominated producer/mixer

August 13: Re-Mixing, Beats and Percussive Rhythms
Hosted by: Cool & Dre, production/songwriting team

September 12: Reverb, Spectral Energy and Human Positional Perception
Hosted by: Greg Lukens, engineer and founder of Audio Fabricators

October 25: Engineer’s Roundtable: Award-winning Engineers Discuss Recording Tips, Tricks and Trends
Moderated by: Al Schmitt, 21-time Grammy-winning producer/engineer

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TRUE Systems’ Precision 8 Helps Percussionist and International Grammy Winner Julio Figueroa Capture His Sound “Exactly as He Hears It”

OLD LYME, Conn. – March 27, 2012 –Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Julio Figueroa is a percussionist and multiple Grammy award winner whose unique style of drumming has been featured on performances by artists such as Michael Jackson, B.B. King, Patti LaBelle and others. Like many other musicians today, Figueroa has created a semi-professional recording environment in his own home and simply uploads his tracks to an FTP server, where they are accessed by various production teams all over the world. He considers the Sennheiser-distributed TRUE Systems Precision 8 preamplifier a fundamental component of his setup.

“For drums and percussion, the Precision 8 captures my sound exactly as I hear it and this is what I value the most,” he states. Figueroa started with one Precision 8 and then acquired a second one so he could accommodate a greater range of percussion and other instruments, as well as take them on the road. “Now if I want to do a live recording I have everything I need,” he observes.

M-S Decoder and Mic Placement
In addition to the transparent sound characteristics of the Precision 8, Figueroa also appreciates the unit’s powerful integrated M-S decoder, which provides greater versatility and enables him to control the stereo spread of his drum overheads via the front panel of the unit with minimal mic repositioning. “For jazz, that M-S capability is incredible if you want to get a great room sound. You set up a couple of mics (cardioid and figure-8 pattern) and it is just unbelievable,” he says. Figueroa frequently uses both the M-S technique and the “Recorderman” technique simultaneously, along with four additional mics on individual drums. This provides him with tremendous flexibility when it’s time to mix down.

Figueroa, who has over 60 snare drums to choose from and four full kits (Jazz, Classics, Collectors and Performance series) from drum manufacturer DW, wants to stay focused on the sounds he is getting out of his instrument rather than fiddling with knobs and settings. “The TRUE Systems Precision 8 is great for someone like me who is not overly technical,” he says. “The units are simple to use right out of the box and there is nothing complicated about it. This means I can get to work faster.”

By using his Precision 8 preamplifiers, Figueroa is confident that when his producers access his percussion tracks on an FTP site, they will like what they hear. “My engineer and producer colleagues get a pristine-sounding file and they can tweak it any way they want for the mix,” he explains. “This is very important when you are doing tracks from a remote location because there is no producer here to tell you how they’d like it to sound. Since the sonic signature is more transparent, this gives them more flexibility in the final stages of the production.”

Tried and TRUE quality
The TRUE Systems Precision 8 uses a high-voltage composite architecture with discrete devices plus integrated circuits, and offers very low noise and distortion as well as high headroom. The totally balanced dual-servo design eliminates nearly all capacitors in the audio path and is DC-coupled at the output. This results in a very detailed and transparent sound characteristic.

Features of the Precision 8 include:

• Eight highly transparent solid state microphone preamps in a 1 unit rack configuration
• Built-in M-S (Mid-Side) decoding for creative spatial image control
• Active, high-impedance instrument inputs (“DI’s”) selectable on two channels
• 5-segment level indicators with peak-hold feature and selectable peak reference
• Smooth continuous gain controls
• Easy integration with MDM’s, HDR’s, DAW’s, or consoles
• Dual DB25/TRS outputs for flexible interconnection

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Antelope Audio Isochrone OCX Master Clock Helps Ensure System Clarity During Austin Music Festival

Austin, TX, March 27, 2012– Every spring, thousands of artists and tens of thousands of record industry professionals flock to Austin, TX for a jam-packed schedule of live music showcases featuring everyone from young, up-and-coming bands to seasoned veteran performers. For six days, live music can be heard at almost any time of day emerging from every conceivable venue in downtown Austin, from the city’s bars, clubs and concert halls to churches, parks and empty lots.

One such makeshift venue – an auto repair shop – this year served as the main stage at the BandPage HQ, where FOH engineer/system tech and production manager Patrick Mundy used an Antelope Audio Isochrone OCX master clock to ensure PA system clarity in the acoustically unfriendly environment. “This was my second year of working showcases at the festival and my second year bringing my Antelope clock,” says Mundy.

BandPage is a popular application developed by RootMusic of San Francisco that launched in 2010. It runs in Facebook and allows artists to create customized fan pages.

The OCX does a fantastic job of stabilizing a digital mixing console when running high channel counts, he continues. “When you build up that much information on a digital desk without having the stabilization of the clocking you can get unfavorable results. Clocking your digital console with an Antelope clock is like turbocharging your desk. The difference between clocked and non-clocked audio is extremely noticeable. I don’t like to work without it.”

Mundy was part of the crew from DBS Sound in Los Angeles who teamed up with Austin’s Miller Pro Audio to handle audio at the BandCamp HQ’s three venues, comprising Empire Automotive, Club 606 and an adjoining outdoor patio. “I mixed FOH for such artists as Porter Robinson, Thomas Wynn and the Believers, Daedelus, TNGHT (Hudson Mohawke & Lunice), Das Racist, Nico Vega, Imagine Dragons, Robert DeLong, Saint Motel, Toy, Escort, Henry Clay People and many more,” he reports. “We also had appearances from such artists as J. Cole and Chairlift, who carried their own FOH engineers.”

Jeffrey Ehrenberg at Vintage King Audio initially introduced Mundy to Antelope Audio’s master clocks in 2008. Mundy purchased an Isochrone 10M Rubidium atomic master clock and an OCX for his Pro Tools|HD3 recording rig, and in 2009 permanently racked the OCX into a two-space unit and began to use it on all of his live shows.

“The OCX is a staple on my gigs from small corporate events to large arena festivals and everything in between,” says Mundy. “I find the clock and its jitter reduction allows me to get to the core of the sound and bring a better mix to listeners. It makes my life easier and I’m able to have more fun just being a front of house engineer and bringing out the natural qualities of the music versus trying to fix artifacts.”

Antelope Audio Zodiac D-to-A converters also made an appearance in Austin this year in the 45-foot UniqueSquared Mobile Studio bus. The mobile recording studio, outfitted with Sennheiser products, featured a number of listening stations where Zodiac DACs were paired with Sennheiser’s flagship HD 800 plus HD 700 headphones.

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AVI-SPL Chooses Sennheiser as a Key Manufacturing Partner to Facilitate Installed Sound / Systems Integration Projects

Old Lyme, Conn., March 20 2012: Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that it has been chosen by leading audiovisual communications provider AVI-SPL as one of three exclusive microphone manufacturer suppliers. AVI-SPL is the largest commercial integrator in the installed sound market with revenues of over $550 million per year. Herman Procurement and Logistics, Sennheiser’s exclusive U.S. distributor in the installed sound / systems integration market, will provide strategic procurement under the new partnership.

“We are pleased to enter a new phase of strategic relations with AVI-SPL, which is among the most respected commercial integrators in the world,” commented Dawn Birr, vice president, sales and marketing for installed sound and distributed brands at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “This partnership will help us achieve an even greater presence in all areas of the installed sound / system integration markets. We look forward to pursuing mutually beneficial opportunities with both AVI-SPL and Herman.”

The new strategic partnership between Sennheiser and AVI-SPL will ultimately benefit both companies, resulting in a higher level of service and potential cost savings for end-user customers, which consist of Fortune 100 companies, entertainment venues, government entities and many other enterprises and organizations. Herman, meanwhile, continues to provide Sennheiser with an expansive product line and service programs catered specifically to the commercial A/V marketplace.

“AVI-SPL has chosen Sennheiser as one of its primary manufacturing partners due to its longstanding reputation for uncompromising performance and manufacturing quality,” commented Patrick Hannon, director of procurement at AVI-SPL. “We are pleased to extend our strategic relationship with Sennheiser, as this enables us to consolidate our purchases and ultimately realize a higher level of service to our customers.”

Herman, which is a leading provider of connectivity and infrastructure products and services, has been Sennheiser’s exclusive distributor for the IS/SI market since October, 2009. In addition to being a nationally recognized distributor, Herman has leveraged its 48 years of industry experience to help customers improve operational efficiencies and achieve cost savings related to the procurement and management of project materials.

“This is a win-win for AVI-SPL, Sennheiser and Herman,” commented Jeffrey Wolf, executive vice president of Herman. “We are pleased to have played a major role in developing this strategic procurement program, which represents yet another milestone for our companies and will lead to exciting growth prospects in 2012.”

SmithsonMartin to Demonstrate Emulator Dual View System, Kontrol Surface 1974 and Emulator 1.0 Software at WMC

MIAMI BEACH, 15 March 2012— Multi-touch software developer SmithsonMartin Inc., announced that it will demonstrate its latest solutions for DJs, producers and lighting professionals at the WMC (Winter Music Conference) in Miami Beach on Wednesday, March 21st. The Emulator Dual View System, Kontrol Surface 1974 and the recently introduced Emulator Modular 1.0 software are among the products that will be featured in a private demonstration hosted by Alan Smithson, CEO of SmithsonMartin.

“The Emulator Kontrol Surface 1974 is a big step forward in multi-touch performance tools. Not only does it look cool, but provides just the right size interface with a small footprint that is travel friendly. I’m looking forward to integrating it into my sets” – Morgan Page, DJ, Producer & Two-Time Grammy Nominee

The new Emulator Modular 1.0 software extends the functionality and flexibility of the Emulator control platform, allowing users to leverage an unprecedented degree of control and flexibility over settings and parameters. Details on the event are below. For RSVP information, please contact Corey at 1-305-482-3005 or contact corey@korlighting.com.

– What: Private demonstration of the SmithsonMartin Emulator Dual View System, Kontrol Surface and Emulator Modular 1.0 software by CEO Alan Smithson
– Where: KOR Media and Lighting Studio, 2021 NW 1st Place, Miami, Fla. 33127
– When: Wednesday, March 21, 2012between 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
– Who should attend: DJs, Producers and Lighting Professionals

Separately, to coincide with its latest software release, SmithsonMartin announced a price restructuring on its Emulator software. Effective immediately, all Emulator software costs just $99 for a lifetime license, including all upgrades and future updates of Emulator for MS Windows X86. Between now and March 31st, SmithsonMartin will offer a $500 discount on any of its hardware to customers who have purchased software at the previous price of $499.

“Even though we have just launched Emulator Modular 1.0, it has already become very well received in the press and wildly popular among users in the DJ universe and beyond,” commented Alan Smithson. “The next logical step for us its to make it more economical and widely accessible to an expanded user base. As a measure of goodwill to customers who have already purchased licenses at the higher price, we are offering very significant discounts on any of our hardware items.”

For more information on attaining a lifetime license on Emulator software or to learn about the discount program for prior purchases, please visit http://www.smithsonmartin.com/software

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Red Rooster Harlem Combines Cultural Diversity, American Roots Cuisine and Compact, Powerful Sound by K-array

New York – March 12, 2012: Red Rooster Harlem is a new restaurant named after the legendary Harlem speakeasy that once stood on 138th Street and Seventh Avenue, which was frequented by prominent musicians, poets and politicians of the day including Nat King Cole, James Baldwin, Adam Clayton Powell Jr. and many others. Today’s Red Rooster Harlem embraces the spirit of Harlem’s past, while incorporating the latest technology advancements from K-array, an Italian loudspeaker brand distributed by Sennheiser .

Red Rooster Harlem’s chef is Marcus Samuelsson — a Harlem resident who is regarded as one of “The Great Chefs of America” by the Culinary Institute of America. Samuelsson serves up a menu as vibrant as Harlem’s diverse population. Like the food, the music there is equally as colorful, representing the entire gamut of musical genres — on any given night, you might hear hip-hop, gospel, jazz, soul or Latin. The chosen sound system had to perform equally well across each of these.

Justin Lizama, Managing Partner of The Solidman Group (TSG), was responsible for the system design and chose K-array to ensure the best possible audio experience for both patrons and musicians. “We were looking fora versatile system that could provide even sound dispersion and a sleek visual profile,” he recalls. “I wanted to build something that was exciting from a technology perspective that would keep the aesthetic visuals in balance with the room. The K-array KK 50s were the perfect choice.”

Attaining clear, even dispersion wasn’t easy in an environment fraught with acoustic challenges: “The space includes pillars and very low ceilings, so there is not a lot of room for high speaker placements,” observes Jim Feeney, account executive at The Zeo Group, which assisted in specifying and integrating the audio system. “To keep everything covered, we were able to tuck and hide several KK50s — so there was no longer an issue with clearance.”

K-array: “King of Coverage”

With two stage set-ups — one for everyday use and the other for larger performances — it was important to uphold the visual appeal of the high-end boutique room, while providing high quality audio for both audiences and performers. The system was comprised of seven K-array KH15s and seven KK50s compact line-array elements, two KL 18 loudspeakers, two KL12 MA powered subwoofers and two KL21 MA powered subwoofers. The KK 50s, with a dispersion pattern of 120 x 7 degrees, were placed so they could precisely reach difficult areas.

The sound of the new K-array system is described by Lizama as “super tight and transparent. We see a lot of new equipment every year, and I definitely think that the K-array products are a great advancement in technology,” he says. “If we had used a traditional system, it would not have been aesthetically pleasing — trapezoidal boxes are not fun to look at.”

If you are trying to build a sophisticated room, the audio should be just as sophisticated,” Lizama concludes. “In New York City, space is always at a premium, and in this business, coverage is king. At Red Rooster Harlem, whether patrons are seated by the back wall or in a corner, they hear the same definition and audio quality that everyone else is hearing in the room.”

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Related Topics: Line Array, Loudspeakers, News |

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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