A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive by Kelly Perkins

Vaddio’s New AV Bridge Provides the Gateway from Analog to Digital

Vaddio’s AV Bridge provides a USB gateway from your traditional analog AV components to your PC. Based on UVC/UAC USB standards, no special USB drivers need to be installed, and as a result, it work seamlessly with any software application running on any operating system that supports USB 2.0 devices. Whether you want to do a Skype video call or need to set up lecture capture using Panopto’s software lecture application, the AV Bridge provides the USB connection to your AV system.

AV Bridge

AV Bridge

“We designed the AV Bridge to provide our integrators with the ability to integrate professional video and audio products into any PC application,” explained Rob Sheeley, President of Vaddio. “Enterprise users are demanding high-quality audio and video performance from their computers, so whether you want to record, stream or even do a video conference, the AV Bridge encodes your analog AV signals into a digital USB stream that can be used with any application and on any OS.”

The AV Bridge can support switchable balanced or unbalanced audio – and switchable HDMI, RGBHV, SD or HD component video inputs. Video inputs can be up or down converted as required. Outputs include USB 2.0 with HD UVC/UAC device support and an Ethernet network interface for both IP control and streaming, supporting RTSP and HLS streaming clients.

The AV Bridge makes it simple to encode, capture and stream your AV content through a variety of PC applications or directly to the network. You now have a true digital gateway to capture, record and stream those legacy analog solutions.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News |

Vaddio Launches EasyUSB – Tools for the USB Revolution

With Vaddio’s EasyUSB tools you now have Pro AV quality computer peripherals you need to transform your personal computer into an effective, affordable meeting room system. Whether you are looking to design a small videoconferencing system or a large integrated lecture capture classroom, Vaddio gives you the tools you need to make your software applications work in a real world AV environment.

EasyUSB Tools

EasyUSB Tools

“Until now, audio and video products designed to work with a computer have produced fairly low-quality sound and images,” explained Rob Sheeley, President of Vaddio. “We wanted to create a new standard for computer peripherals based on professional AV quality performance. We believe we have delivered just that with our new line of EasyUSB products. Now you can build an enterprise-quality videoconferencing system with affordable soft codecs like Microsoft Lync, Skype or Google Talk.”

Vaddio’s EasyUSB tools include an HD USB PTZ camera, a USB audio mixer/amplifier, USB microphone options – and for control, a web-based room control system. For those legacy and traditional AV systems, Vaddio introduces the AV Bridge – your gateway from analog to digital. The AV Bridge lets you connect audio and video inputs to your computer through a USB connection, allowing the integration of legacy AV systems into group collaboration software.

And Vaddio’s EasyUSB tools are based on UVC/UAC USB standards, eliminating the need for custom software drivers or a particular OS to be installed on the PC – so they work seamlessly with any soft client conferencing systems including Skype, Google+, Movi and Microsoft Lync, as well as lecture capture software systems such as Tegrity and Panopto. When added to your PC, the combination of EasyUSB tools create a complete group AV solution that allows users to engage in any type of collaboration and conference activity. The USB revolution is here.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News |

Vaddio Adds Further Usability to ProductionVIEW HD MV Camera Control Console with Built-In Multiviewer

Vaddio announces new enhancements to the ProductionVIEW HD MV all-in-one camera control console with multiviewer capabilities, digital inputs/outputs, HD, RGBHV and SD video mixing, transitions, lower screen graphics and automated control functionality.

ProductionVIEW-HD-MV

ProductionVIEW-HD-MV


New Multi-View Input Screens allow the user to select between screen layouts that display four, five or six inputs. When set up with four or five preview windows, the preset video thumbnails become larger on the bottom of the screen. In addition, the Preview and Program windows can be swapped on the multiviewer output. With Vaddio’s TeleTouch touch screen monitors, all live video feeds can be selected and up to 12 video thumbnail presets can be created, recalled and stored by simply touching the monitor. The thumbnails are a snapshot of what the camera preset shot looks like, to make storing and recalling presets even easier. Simply touch a thumbnail and the camera will pan, tilt and zoom to that position. The Cut, Wipe and Fade buttons illuminate on the multiviewer display, giving a visual indication of which effect is active.
An additional capability of the system is Dual Bus Multiview output. “A big request from our integrators was to add greater flexibility in allowing them to configure the system output options,” explained President of Vaddio, Rob Sheeley. “As a result of this feedback we now allow the system to be configured in several different ways including a Preview/Program mode, a Split Bus mode, where the system can be configured as two independent 1 x 6 switchers, and a third discreet multiviewer output for control and display.”

All inputs are autosensing for video resolution, control and camera type. Video inputs include five analog HD YPbPr video, RGBHV, SD (Y/C and CVBS) and a single DVI-I input on channel six that allows for multiple formats (DVI-D, YPbPr, RGBHV and HDMI) with 36 additional input resolutions. The Program and Preview outputs have both analog (YPbPr, RGBHV, Y/C and CVBS) and digital (DVI-D or HDMI) outputs. HD resolutions up to 1080/60p are supported.   

An additional capability of the system is Dual Bus Multiview output. This allows the user to switch the Preview and Program buses as discrete outputs – with one output going to an IMAG Projector and the other going to a recording device. The control surface includes a broadcast-style 3-axis Hall Effect Joystick with twist-handle zoom control and separate Pan, Tilt and Speed control knobs. Get an all-in-one camera control console with video mixing, built-in multiviewer and broadcast-quality effects.

This firmware upgrade is available at no charge for any customer who currently owns a ProductionVIEW HD MV. Contact Vaddio Tech Support at +1 (763) 971-4400 for assistance in loading the new firmware.

Vaddio Shipping ProductionVIEW HD-SDI MV Camera Control Console with Multiviewer

The ProductionVIEW HD-SDI MV is an all-in-one camera control console with HD-SDI/SDI video switching/mixing, a built-in multiviewer, lower screen graphics and automated control functionality.

“Our new Multi-View touch screen control panel layout options allow our integrators the ability to match their screen layout to the number of camera or computer input sources that they have connected to the system,” explained President of Vaddio, Rob Sheeley. “This way they can maximize the potential screen size available for previewing their live video feeds and not see unused multi-viewer input windows. The ProductionVIEW MV series of production switchers combines the best of Vaddio’s PTZ camera control technology with best-of-class digital SDI switching technology. Now with an integrated multiviewer functionality that includes touch screen control, we can’t think of a better customer experience than allowing the end user to visually control input sources, camera presets, and system control – all by just touching the screen.”

ProductionVIEW-HD-SDI MV

ProductionVIEW-HD-SDI MV


Vaddio’s TeleTouch multiviewer touch screen monitors allow switching of all live video feeds, and up to 12 video thumbnail presets can be created, recalled and stored by simply touching the monitor. The thumbnails are a snapshot of what the camera preset shot looks like, to make storing and recalling presets even easier. By touching a thumbnail, the camera will pan, tilt and zoom to that position.

An additional capability of the system is Dual Bus Multiview output. This allows the user to switch between Preview and Program as discrete outputs – with one going to an IMAG Projector and the other going to a recording device. You now have three options for configuring the system: Preview/Program mode, Dual Bus mode and a third discreet multiviewer output for control and display.

All inputs are autosensing for video resolution, control and camera type. Video inputs include five HD-SDI/SDI (480i to 1080p) inputs on BNC connectors and a single DVI-I input on channel six that allows for multiple formats (DVI-D, YPbPr, RGBHV and HDMI) with 36 additional input resolutions. The outputs have been enhanced to include both HD-SDI and HDMI outputs – a distinct advantage when choosing a set of inexpensive preview and program monitors or using Vaddio TeleTouch touch screen monitors.

The control surface includes a broadcast-style 3-axis Hall Effect Joystick with twist-handle zoom control and separate Pan, Tilt and Speed control knobs. Because ProductionVIEW HD-SDI MV is a live broadcast production console, not a computer, the entire system produces only one frame of delay – a critical requirement for live production where IMAG is used. 

Vaddio Captures the Science Behind Baby Talk at East Carolina University

Think the cooing, grunting or wailing sounds a baby makes mean nothing? Think again.

By using Vaddio cameras, East Carolina assistant professor, Heather L. Ramsdell is studying how baby sounds develop in the first year of life and the link between those sounds, first words and early language development. “The ultimate goal is to gain a better understanding of normal vocal development patterns in infants, so we can identify earlier those who are at risk for developing speech and language problems,” explains Ramsdell.
Infant Vocal Development Laboratory Nursery
Since joining ECU in 2010, Ramsdell has created the Infant Vocal Development Laboratory (IVDL) in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. The IVDL provides a state-of-the art infant and child recording suite consisting of a nursery/playroom and a control room.

The nursery lab is filled with colored blocks, books and stuffed toys – so parents and children can eat, nap, play – do whatever they do at home. An infant would never even notice the eight cameras partially hidden by purple monkeys mounted strategically throughout the room.

“We have eight cameras – four upper and four lower – but we only need to record two at a time,” explains Ramsdell. “The reason we have so many cameras is that when we analyze the data we need to have a very good view of the baby’s face.” Two angles are recorded: a close up shot of the baby and a wide shot of the interaction between the parent and baby. “We need to know where the baby is looking while talking and be able to see the facial affects. Was the baby happy or sad? Was he or she looking at mom? Did the baby respond to something mom did or said? We have to have the flexibility of changing camera angles to the best views possible.” Having eight cameras provides this flexibility.
“Vaddio allows us to have even more flexibility because all of the cameras move side-to-side and up-and-down.” Each mount is located on a sliding track so they can be repositioned even more. To permit even more camera angles, each wall is covered in mirrors. “We might not be able to get a good camera angle from Camera 1 or 2, but we can get a great shot in the mirror from Camera 3.”

Audio is recorded separately with attached wireless microphones worn by both mom and baby.

The audio and video is captured in an adjacent control room with two Vaddio ProductionVIEW FX camera control systems, two capturing devices and two monitors for viewing. Mark Allen, ECU’s electronics specialist, designed the system according to what Ramsdell needed. “When Heather came in she had a list of all the equipment she had been using in Memphis where she recently completed her Ph.D.,” explained Allen. “The way academia works is we try and replicate the labs they came from. I looked at her list and started searching the Internet and other departments on campus.” This is where he was redirected to Herb McGrail with Whitlock.

“I had worked with Vaddio cameras on previous installs at the ECU Brody School of Medicine,” explained McGrail. “I worked with Mark to create a list of everything he would need.”

The entire install only took two months. “By the time we got the funds we needed, we knew exactly what we wanted,” said Ramsdell. “I had already started recruiting participants.” Sixteen families are participating in the study and have been coming in once a month for eight months now. Between Ramsdell and her small army of undergraduate and graduate students in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, they’ve recorded over 112 times.

Every time a family comes in at least three people are needed to control everything. During recordings, laboratory staff members have control over each individual Vaddio camera. “Let’s say Camera 1 has a wide shot of mom and baby playing on the mat,” says Ramsdell, “We can zoom in with Camera 1, but Camera 3 would be at a much better angle because I could get a close-up of the baby’s face. All of this can be done simultaneously. We can record and change from any two cameras all at the same time. We just work together and communicate to get the best angles possible.”

In the end, Ramsdell hopes the study will lead to better and earlier treatment of speech and language disorders in young children. The discovery that an early communication problem may be developing allows her team – and eventually others in the field – to facilitate diagnostic and treatment intervention at an extremely early age.

“It’s a very specialized study, but you’d be surprised at how many research labs across the country have recording rooms like this,” explained Ramsdell. “I have a lot of students who may eventually continue on for their doctoral degrees and one day create their own infant labs – across the country – across the world.”

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: Case Studies, Education, News |

Trinity Baptist Church Captures Every Angle with Vaddio PTZ Technology

Porché Advanced Systems Transforms Trinity Baptist Church into a Remotely Controlled, High Definition, Multi-Camera Facility
Twelve years ago Trinity Baptist Church outgrew its facility in historic downtown Lake Charles, La. and headed to a spacious 40-acre lot on the southern tip of the city. Because of the scale of the new multi-building campus, new communication technology upgrades were a necessity. Phase-by-phase and building-by-building Porché Advanced Systems used Vaddio pan/tilt/zoom camera systems to transform Trinity Baptist Church into a remotely controlled, high-definition, multi-camera facility.
The Phases of Trinity
Phase 1 consisted of an extensive Sunday school classroom space and what is referred to as the main Worship Center. The main Worship Center holds about 1200 people, including an additional platform for the orchestra and choir loft.
Phase 2 continued in 2005 with the Trinity Center, a combination gymnasium-fitness area and a wing devoted to youth ministries – which would eventually house a contemporary worship center called the Cavern.
The Cavern was originally designed to house 300 students. “We came in after-the-fact and started the idea of a contemporary worship venue,” explained Randy Monroe, Associate Pastor at Trinity. “The idea was to run a contemporary worship service and a regular service at the same time – each with a different style of music. At 9:15 and 10:45 every Sunday there are a total of four worship services – two live with the pastor preaching in the main Worship Center and two with live video fed to the Cavern.”
Currently Monroe delays the live video feed to the Cavern on a TiVo DVR in the event both services don’t finish at the exact same time. “Usually within three or four minutes the songs come to conclusion, they hit the Play button, the hi-def screen comes down on the big stage and they start running the video feed.”
“Because the pastor was very adamant about keeping the contemporary venue onsite, the Cavern was really the only option. The challenge was making the Cavern go beyond its original design.”
This is where Porché came into the picture.
The Solution
“We first encountered Vaddio at InfoComm when we were looking for a high definition video feed from the main Worship Center to the Cavern,” explained Jason Ryder of Porché. “We ended up installing the Panasonic HE-100 PTZ camera and at first that worked really well.”
In 2010, TK’s Place (Trinity Kids Place) was completed with 33,600 square feet of space specifically designed for children and preschoolers. “The construction of TK’s Place really started the additional upgrade of the Worship Center,” said Ryder. “We installed the newest and best technology and they were so impressed it triggered the snowball effect of moving everything to high definition. They were looking at small projection systems for the main Worship Center and they said ‘wow this seems so inadequate compared to TK’s Place’.”
Into the Worship Center came two 22-foot 1080p HD projection screens and a need for even more HD cameras. “After debating and looking at different options, they really wanted more camera angles but didn’t necessarily have enough spots to put them where people could man them. So we looked to Vaddio again,” stated Ryder. “Our solution was to add three Vaddio HD-19 PTZ cameras for supporting-angled shots and a studio-quality JVC 1080p manned camera.”
The JVC studio camera is recessed into the center back wall of the Worship Center – positioned next to a wall-mounted HD-19. The additional two HD-19 cameras sit far left and far right. The HE-100 was moved as a rear shot. The center HD-19 is the live video feed to an HD projection system located inside the Cavern.
The cameras are controlled by two Vaddio Precision Camera Controllers. The left and right shots are hooked up to the first controller and the center/cavern and rear supporting camera shots are on the second controller. Staff and volunteers run the camera controllers.
“I’ve had a lot of experience with Vaddio in other installations,” explained Ryder. “As far as a robotic PTZ camera goes, nothing beats installing with Cat. 5 and still getting a high-quality, high definition image. Price is always a big factor and because these cameras are reasonable, we were not only able to get more shots, we could also get the additional controllers.”
Future of HD on Trinity Campus
In addition to the Cavern overflow, the video is also recorded, archived and burned to DVDs for elderly shut ins and volunteers. Monroe added, “On a regular Sunday morning we have 300 babies, birth through 2-years-old, in our preschool department and because its mostly volunteers who take care of the children we also provide them a DVD of the service they missed.”
They even make their own commercials. While some of the commercials are shot offsite, shots of the worship services and instrumentalists are used for B-roll footage.
Eventually they hope to upload the services and stream live but their partial T1 just doesn’t cut it. “At the moment it’s just not feasible,” explained Monroe. “But because we have all the backend cameras in place we are much closer to that reality – now we just need to get the other parts and pieces into place.”
“We’re happy with the new HD system – because it’s so new we’re still learning how to use the system. One of the biggest challenges for some of our volunteers is getting used to the robotic controllers. Our younger generation is a joystick generation so they’re having a great time with it – but they still need practice on moving the cameras left/right, up/down and zoom in/zoom out. There’s a learning curve, but every day they’re doing better and better.”
About Vaddio:
Vaddio is the leading manufacturer and OEM distributor of specialty PTZ cameras, high-end camera control systems and custom furniture used in the broadcasting, audiovisual and videoconferencing industries. Headquartered in Minneapolis, MN, Vaddio also has operations throughout the Americas, as well as sales and support partners throughout the world. More information can be found on the Vaddio website, www.vaddio.com or at (800) 572.2011.
About Porché Advanced Systems:
With over 30 years combined experience, Porché Advanced Systems has designed, built, installed and serviced some of the most impressive commercial audio/video and lighting projects in Louisiana. Turnkey projects that include large format audio systems and intelligent lighting for churches and entertainment venues, retail background audio, projector installation, video distribution, custom home theater, distributed audio and room calibrations. More information can be found at 337-478-5642 or by email at info@porcheinc.com.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News |

Vaddio Regional Training Program to Launch January 1, 2012

Vaddio Training Program now to Include Online, On-site and Regional Courses

MINNEAPOLIS, MN (December 19, 2011) – Regional and online product training courses will be offered beginning January 1, 2012, in addition to the existing Camera Tracking Training classes. Vaddio Technical Trainer, Scott Rolfes, will conduct in-depth training on design, engineering, installation and techniques for integrating Vaddio equipment into a variety of applications. In addition, Bernadette Yard, Marketing and Training Coordinator, will also teach a sales and marketing curriculum.

“We understand the importance of training our dealers out in the field,” explained President of Vaddio, Rob Sheeley. “And we know how difficult it is to travel to get the training you need. We are committed to offering the training and education to our dealers in the field so they can easily and effectively integrate our solutions into their designs.”

With these courses you will gain a professional and relevant understanding of Vaddio products, how they integrate into different environments, installation and design requirements, what products are necessary (or unnecessary), room limitations and how to manage the technology over time. The classes will be offered online, at Vaddio headquarters or regionally out in the field. Custom classes will also be available upon request.

To schedule a Vaddio training course please contact your local rep or go www.vaddio.com/training. For more information or details please contact Bernadette Yard at (763) 971-4466 or by email at byard@vaddio.com.
###
About Vaddio:
Vaddio is the leading manufacturer and OEM distributor of specialty PTZ cameras and high-end camera control systems in the broadcasting, audiovisual and videoconferencing industry. Headquartered in Minneapolis, MN, Vaddio also has operations throughout the Americas, as well as sales and support partners throughout the world. More information can be found on the Vaddio website, www.vaddio.com or at (800) 572.2011.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News |

Vaddio Shipping New High Definition Document Cameras

Add high-definition magnification and dimension to original objects, documents or drawings with Vaddio’s new CeilingVIEW HD-18 DocCam document camera system. Replacing the CeilingVIEW HD document camera, the CeilingVIEW HD-18 DocCAM features an 18x optical zoom lens for enhanced detail and greater zoom capabilities, and a 1.3 megapixel CCD image sensor with a 1.8-LUX for better-quality low-light performance. Select from either HD resolutions through our Quick-Connect system or the analog RGBHV output on the camera backbox.

“Using our own ClearVIEW HD-18 technology for the new high definition document camera allows us not only greater zoom capability,” explains Rob Sheeley, President of Vaddio, “but also a higher-quality CCD sensor for exceptional color and detail reproduction at very high resolutions.”

Both Quick-Connect Short Range (SR) and Quick-Connect DVI/HDMI SR options are available. The CeilingVIEW HD-18 with Quick-Connect SR outputs component HD (YPbPr) at 720p, 1080i or 1080p. The CeilingVIEW HD-18 with DVI/HDMI Quick-Connect SR outputs simultaneous component HD and DVI/HDMI at 720p, 1080i or 1080p. Both cameras also provide the option for RGBHV resolutions at 1024 x 768, 1280 x 720 or 1680 x 1050 at 60 Hz.

Add the CCU Image Controller to either of the CeilingVIEW HD-18 DocCAM systems and how you have the ability to adjust red and blue gain, gamma, chroma, knee, pedestal, iris and gain. User-defined adjustments may be stored using two Scene buttons.

Technical specifications, install guides and sample configurations are available at www.vaddio.com.

About Vaddio:
Vaddio is the leading manufacturer and OEM distributor of specialty PTZ cameras and high-end camera control systems in the broadcasting, audiovisual and videoconferencing industry. Headquartered in Minneapolis, MN, Vaddio also has operations throughout the Americas, as well as sales and support partners throughout the world. More information can be found on the Vaddio website, www.vaddio.com or at (800) 572.2011.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: News |

State-of-the-Art Architecture Meets Cutting-Edge Technology with Vaddio Cameras

By combining innovative architecture and audiovisual technology with the growing needs of one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities; Vaughan’s new 180,000-square-foot City Hall easily meets the needs of Vaughan’s growing population and enhances the delivery of municipal services. Vaddio cameras are buried throughout the city council chamber and committee rooms, in walls, above ceilings and in half-walls so they are unobtrusive – all part of the architect’s aesthetic that Canadian-based systems integrator, Duocom, had to work with.

City of Vaughan City Council Chamber

City of Vaughan City Council Chamber

Why a New building?

Because the original City Hall building wasn’t large enough to house everyone, committee members were meeting all over the city. Nobody was under the same roof and there was no centralized place for people to meet. Old touch-to-talk microphones were daisy-chained along the table; the request-to-queue and voting system never worked. An analog recorder was used to record audio, but there were no cameras. It was a legacy system in use for 15 – 20 years.

“It was almost as if they were using what they had to get by,” explained Omar Prashad of Duocom. “It’s my assumption from the city that there’s no point in spending a bunch of money upgrading systems when you know down the line a few years you’re going to have a new building.”

According to the City of Vaughan, the previous Civic Centre was renovated in 1982 when Vaughan’s population was 36,815. Today, Vaughan’s population is 295,000, and is expected to increase to 418,000 by 2031. The old system just couldn’t withstand the rapid growth.
So through a month-long Needs Analysis process and a lot of input from different users and user groups, Duocom came up with a solution.

The Council Chamber

From an AV perspective there are five or six significant areas – the most significant being the council chamber where regional counselors meet. 

“Walk into the Council Chamber and you feel like you’re walking into a very contemporary architectural space,” says Prashad. “The tiered seating, custom wood walls and ceilings, flown in from Denmark, and the circular council desk definitely add to the ‘modern’ appeal.” The mayor sits in the middle of the circular table with the counselors on one side and senior management on the other. The AV system for the entire facility is controlled and routed through the council chamber with a centralized architecture for control and signal distribution.

The AV system, in this room alone, cost just under $900,000. Two Christie High Lumens 1080p 3-chip projectors sit on opposite sides of the council chamber so everyone in the room has a direct view at all times. All signal routing is digital, utilizing Crestron’s Digital Media platform and control from numerous Crestron Touch Panel Displays. One sits at every desk allowing the counselors to vote, see results and make tabulations.
“Aside from the mayor, the counselors never sit in the same place,” explained Prashad. “And because during a six-hour council meeting any of the counselors could potentially be the chair of that meeting, a discrete login system for each touch panel had to be put into place.”

Each person has his/her own code. Unless you’re the designated chairperson, none are for control – just for voting and confidence monitors for whatever is on the projection screen. As opposed to the typical touch-to-talk mics, the chairperson has control over all of the mics and cameras, and is able to view the request-to-speak lists and queue on the panel in front of them.

The Vaddio Solution


Vaddio WallVIEW HD-19 and HE-100 cameras are distinct inputs to the AV system, allowing their image to be broadcast throughout the facility or to be used in conjunction with the Polycom HD videoconferencing system, each picking up a different quadrant of the council table. One sits in the back picking up a full shot of the room. Another two sit back-right and back-left picking up opposite quadrants. The camera directly behind the mayor, faces the audience picking up the senior management team, anybody who’s addressing the council from the podium and anyone in the audience should it be required.

“The Vaddio cameras can be used with and without an operator,” added Prashad. “You can either have full pan/tilt/zoom control or you can recall presets through the Crestron control system. Our programmer had to basically create a revolutionary program that linked the Sennheiser microphone system and Biamp audio DSP system so that when a particular microphone was active, the information sends a signal to the camera to trigger the preset.”

Because the AV system as a whole was very high-end – with digital switching at 1080p/60 and 3-chip DLP projectors at 8,000 Lumens, Vaddio cameras were a necessity, explained Prashad. “If we didn’t use Vaddio cameras, the cameras would have been the weakest link in the chain. The quality in the projectors would have been negated; the switching infrastructure would have been negated. We wanted to pick out the highest quality camera that we could to take advantage of the rest of the design infrastructure.”

The video can be broadcast from the council chamber to anywhere else in the building. If there is a high-interest council meeting, the public can view the event internally – or listen externally via Vaughan Radio. While only audio is exported to the residents of Vaughan, Vaughan TV is in development stages. “We’re probably going to incorporate a capture station with a media management server and stream the video,” explained Prashad. “That’s the next generation of this system so residents can log on to the media server and see what’s happening in the council chamber from anywhere at any time.”

“The Vaddio cameras give us a lot of control over color, color temperature, brightness – so when someone looks at the mayor who’s raising taxes for the three year in a row, you see the facial expressions like you’re watching a Blu-ray. There is no point in trying to save $2,000 on cameras if the experience is going to be substandard and sub quality.”

Future Plans

No matter how much planning goes into a large installation, down the road there are going to be changes. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 and 3 are on the way, with an additional building and tunnel to connect them. “Over the course of 5 to 10 years this AV system will be three times the size it is today,” Prashad predicts. “These are the fun projects because the applications allow us to use cutting-edge technology to solve user problems. That’s fun for us because we can really push the limits on the latest technology and what our team can do with it.”

Vaddio Compares PTZ Cameras

MINNEAPOLIS, MN (October 14, 2011) – Tired of digging through piles of technical specifications to gather all the information you need to choose the correct PTZ camera for your application? You no longer have to.

ptz_comparison_img.jpg

Side-by-Side Comparison of the Vaddio HD-20 and Sony EVI-HD1 Cameras
Vaddio announces a side-by-side comparison of the Sony EVI-HD1 and the Vaddio HD-20 PTZ cameras for videoconferencing support in a typical corporate conference room environment. See how both cameras are fully capable of delivering adequate room coverage for video conferencing.
View Video

Robotic PTZ Camera Comparison Chart
We’ve also added a Robotic PTZ Camera Comparison chart for Vaddio-manufactured and OEM HD and SD robotic PTZ camera specifications.
View Chart

“We were having to print out the tech specs for different models of PTZ cameras,? explained Greg Brown, Media Systems Engineer at more

About

Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

Calendar

July 2014
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication