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MythBusters Test the “Frequency of Fear” with Meyer Sound’s New 1100-LFC

When Discovery Channel’s MythBusters set out to test the claim that subaudible low-frequency sounds near 19 Hz can instill feelings of discomfort, dread, and even outright terror, they turned to Meyer Sound and Dr. Roger Schwenke, the company’s staff scientist and honorary MythBuster, for assistance.

Filming for the “fear frequency” segment took place in and around four abandoned cabins at a secluded forest resort in Northern California. To test the theory, the show enlisted 10 volunteers to spend time in the cabins.

“One cabin was subjected to infrasonic sound while the other control cabins had no sound,” says Schwenke. “Although the cabins were essentially identical, the idea was to ask the participants if one cabin seemed more eerie or frightening than the others.”

Unbeknownst to the subjects, a U-shaped array of nine modified Meyer Sound 1100-LFC low-frequency control elements was hidden behind one of the cabins to create the ultra-low sounds.

“We used the U-shape to get the 1100-LFCs as close together as possible,” explains Schwenke, “and to direct any higher overtones away from the cabin so we could get the infrasonic level as high as possible without anything being audible.”

It turns out that nine of the potent 1100-LFC low-frequency control elements were more than needed. “We had to be careful with the level because, at around 95 dB, we started rattling the cabin walls,” recalls Schwenke. “That would have been a dead giveaway.”

Did the MythBusters debunk or confirm the myth? Schwenke isn’t saying: “I did feel a sense of unease. You could tell when it was on even though you couldn’t hear anything. It was more of a whole-body, change-in-the-air sensation, an undefined ominous feeling.”

To find out if the myth was officially confirmed, busted, or deemed merely plausible, tune in to the Discovery Channel on October 28 at 8 PM. The 2012 Halloween edition marks Schwenke’s seventh appearance on the phenomenally popular TV series. In previous episodes, Schwenke applied his expertise and Meyer Sound technical resources to urban myths associated with movie gunshots and explosionsextinguishing flames with sound, the echo of a duck’s call, a human voice breaking glass, and the infamous “brown note.”

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Video: Blackhawk Audio Unveils New Meyer Sound LEO at Beach Festival

At the ultimate beach party in Florida, DeLuna FestBlackhawk Audio demonstrated how its brand new Meyer Sound LEO system delivered what it was built for: to carry a whole new level of musical fidelity and impact for long distances.

Featuring Clint Aull, production manager of DeLuna, and Rick Shimer and Jamie Nixon of Nashville-based Blackhawk Audio, this first LEO video explains the linearity philosophy behind LEO, and how LEO has raised the bar for large-scale sound reinforcement.

The LEO system at DeLuna included the LEO-M line array loudspeaker, MICA line array loudspeaker, 1100-LFC low-frequency control element, and the Galileo Callisto loudspeaker management system. Artists who played on the LEO system included Pearl Jam, Foo Fighters, Zac Brown Band, The Gaslight Anthem, The Joy Formidable, Fitz and The Tantrums, and The Wallflowers.

“No matter where you went, the LEO was in your face. The fidelity of the system is just incredible.” – Jamie Nixon, Blackhawk Audio

Video: Blackhawk Audio Unveils Its New Meyer Sound LEO at Beach Festival

Learn more about the Meyer Sound LEO at www.meyersound.com/leo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic City’s Lavish Revel Resort “Gets Up Close and Personal” with Flexible Meyer Sound Systems

The $2.4 billion Revel casino resort in Atlantic City is an impressive sight, with its gleaming 47-story tower—the tallest in town—and over 1,000 rooms and 130,000 square feet of gaming floor. It’s also an ear-opener at every turn, with Meyer Sound systems installed in Revel’s vast and morphing Ovation Hall, the lively Social theatre and nightclub, and exclusive lounge and gaming areas.

Montreal-based Scéno Plus, responsible for the look and sound of Revel, is the design firm behind The Colosseum theatre at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, also a Meyer Sound installation. While Revel’s 5,500-capacity Ovation Hall is larger than The Colosseum and functions as a reconfigurable multi-purpose venue, their overall goal is the same: to foster a sense of intimacy between the performer and an arena-sized audience.

“We knew Ovation would be a multi-purpose venue, so we looked for solutions that would be easy to manage in various configurations,” says Simon Leonard, who headed the Scéno Plus AV design team. “We also needed a system that was reliable, rider friendly, and with exceptional fidelity to make artists seem ‘up close and personal.’ So it was logical to go with Meyer Sound.”

To cover Ovation Hall’s wide seating arc, the system employs three main arrays of 12-each MICA line array loudspeakers. Two stage-side VIP boxes are covered by four MSL-4 and two DF-4 loudspeakers, while eight UPQ-1P loudspeakers and M1D line array loudspeakers supply out and front fills respectively. Prodigious bass pulses through 20 700-HP subwoofers. The system can be re-matrixed and optimized for five different room configurations via presets in a Galileo loudspeaker management system comprising six Galileo 616 processors (five analog and one AES3 digital).

“The Galileo global snapshots are very easy to set,” says Leonard. “Galileo is a great tool for a hall like this, where it’s all about programmability.”

The AV systems in all Scéno Plus-designed areas in Revel were engineered and installed by Columbia, Md. office of AVI-SPL, with project management by LD Parker and project engineering by Stephanie Bryl and Jeff Vogt.

Revel patrons seeking free entertainment gather at The Social, a 700-capacity theatre and show bar that hosts live music early in the evening and converts to a dance club for late night revelry. The reconfigurable system deploys a total of 37 Meyer Sound UPQ-1P, UPQ-2P, UPM-1P, and UPJunior VariO loudspeakers, plus four 700-HP subwoofers.

Meyer Sound systems also lend extra musical flair to the ocean-view Ultra Lounge and two other areas on the gaming floor. Loudspeakers installed here are 13 miniature MM-4 loudspeakers and three M1D-Sub subwoofers in the Ultra Lounge; eight UPM-1P and a 500-HP subwoofer in the Immersive Dome; and 12 UPJ-1P VariO loudspeakers and four 500-HP subwoofers in the DigiPit.

For AVI-SPL’s LD Parker, the demanding installation project was buttressed by Meyer Sound’s unique combination of product quality and support.

“We know we’ll have a great sounding system,” says Parker. “But we also know we’ll have all the documentation we need for rigging, and we’ll have strong support and service after we’re done. There were no unwelcome surprises here, and that’s what I expect with Meyer Sound.”

Design architect was Arquitectonica; executive architectural firm was BLT Architects, with SOSH as associate executive architect for hospitality and casino spaces.

Founded in 1985, Scéno Plus is an entertainment design firm specializing in cultural infrastructures and highly reconfigurable performance spaces. The company has designed world-class spaces such as The New Joint at Hard Rock Hotel Casino, The Venue at Horseshoe Casino, The Colosseum at Caesars Palace, and the Wynn Las Vegas Showroom.

www.meyersound.com/news

Korea’s Largest Multiplex Installs Meyer Sound Cinema System for New “M 2″ Premium Screen

South Korea’s Megabox chain of movie theatres has selected Meyer Sound’s cinema loudspeaker system for its newly enhanced “M 2″ premium screen concept. At the Megabox COEX, the largest multiplex in Korea with 16 screens, powerful, low-distortion sound now accompanies upgrades to projection and patron amenities.

The “M 2″ screen is now operating in 5.1 and 7.1 surround modes, and when the renovation is complete, this room is set to become Asia’s first Atmos-compliant cinema to be equipped with a Meyer Sound cinema system. All “B chain” elements are in place, including the extensive complement of side, rear, and overhead loudspeakers.

“There has been a lot of competition among the new 3D immersive sound formats,” observes Youlgoo Lee, the chief technical manager for Megabox. “But Meyer Sound convinced us that any new format requires high-quality speakers to present clear and powerful sound to the audience. We have already experienced the difference Meyer Sound makes at our other installation, so we decided to install Meyer Sound systems whenever we get the chance.”

The new system at Megabox COEX includes Acheron 80 and Acheron LF screen channel loudspeakers, X-800C cinema subwoofers, HMS-10 cinema surround loudspeakers, MPS-488HP remote power supplies, and a Galileo loudspeaker management system.

“Even though the full Atmos experience has yet to arrive, we’re already having a very good response from the audiences,” reports Lee. “They say they feel the difference compared to regular cinema sound, so we’re excited about what we will experience with the completion of the system.”

The new Meyer Sound system was provided by Kinoton Korea, the company that installed Asia’s first Meyer Sound cinema system at Megabox KINTEX near Seoul in 2011. Kinoton Korea provides conventional and digital cinema projection systems, as well as advanced sound solutions, to commercial cinemas, broadcasters and film/video production facilities, both within Korea and elsewhere in Asia.

Meyer Sound cinema systems are installed at leading-edge cinemas in the United States and Europe, including Cinetopia in Oregon, CinemaxX in Germany and Denmark, and the Solaris Centre in Estonia. A notable roster of film post-production facilities also rely on Meyer Sound cinema loudspeakers for monitoring, including Lucasfilm’s Skywalker Ranch in California, De Lane Lea in London, and Piste Rouge in Paris.

www.meyersound.com/news

Berkeley’s Crowden Music Center Extends Community Outreach with Meyer Sound Constellation

By installing a Meyer Sound Constellation acoustic system in its principal performance and rehearsal space, the Crowden Music Center in Berkeley, Calif. has greatly extended outreach opportunities to music ensembles throughout the Bay Area, while enhancing performance acoustics for its students.

The Crowden Music Center’s programs encompass The Crowden School, an independent day school for grades four through eight, and the Crowden Center for Music in the Community, which supports classical music in the Bay Area by hosting performances and rehearsals and also by offering classes, private lessons, workshops, and summer camps.

Formally titled the Jacqueline and Peter Hoefer Auditorium, the intimate venue holds an audience of about 200 in flexible seating for small ensemble, choral, and chamber orchestra performances on the stage. In this same space, performers often share the open floor with the audience, or the entire floor becomes a rehearsal stage for a full symphony orchestra. Also, the auditorium must adapt to an exceptionally diverse range of ensembles and music styles as it hosts both its own students and a packed calendar of programs for the local community. As a result, for such a modest facility, the acoustical requirements are extraordinary.

“The original physical acoustics were fine for a school auditorium,” observes Michel Taddei, Crowden’s director of artistic administration and principal double bassist for several area orchestras. “But as we’ve grown into a musical hub, with so many others using the facility, the fixed acoustics were not adequate for the wider range of demands.”

As an example, Taddei cites the Oakland East Bay Symphony, which often uses the auditorium floor as its rehearsal stage. “Before, it was a bit too loud and boomy for a group that size. Musicians were distracted by the room’s sonic buildup. Now, with the acoustic treatments and Constellation, they are delighted with the room’s sound and will be back on a regular basis.”

To address Crowden’s programming requirements, a controllable baseline acoustic was created through physical treatments. The Meyer Sound Constellation team then designed an active acoustical system adaptable to the full range of demands. Constellation here is split into two zones—upper and lateral—and employs the patented VRAS variable room acoustic system hosted on a D-Mitri digital audio platform to create a precise mixture of early reflections and late reverberations across five acoustic presets: speech, chamber, opera, symphony, and choir.

The complete system, installed by San Francisco-based integrator Bug ID, includes 29 Meyer Sound miniature MM-4XP and directional MM-4XPD loudspeakers, 14 MM-10 subwoofers, and 24 microphones.

According to Doris Fukawa, executive director for Crowden Music Center, Constellation’s flexibility is key. “In our after-school programs, it’s invaluable to be able to easily provide the proper acoustics for the smaller chamber ensembles as well as the large symphonic orchestras,” says Fukawa. “For our young students, Constellation allows them to become more aware of any acoustic space they play in and then learn to adapt to these environmental factors.”

The Jacqueline and Peter Hoefer Auditorium is currently still under renovation, with a grand reopening scheduled for fall 2013. The renovation is designed by Donn Logan of Marcy Wong Donn Logan Architects, the Berkeley-based firm behind the AIA Citation Award-winning Pearson Theatre at Meyer Sound’s headquarters. “Since I previously served on the Crowden Board for several years, it has been a special treat for me to see this system installed in Crowden’s Hoefer Auditorium,” says Logan. “Given Crowden’s diverse array of performance and rehearsal requirements, Constellation is the only solution that I know of that could have solved its acoustic needs.”

www.meyersound.com/news

Review of Meyer Sound System at 2012 Telluride Film Festival: “So Incredible, So Crisp”

At the 2012 Telluride Film Festival in the scenic Colorado ski town, a school gymnasium was once again skillfully transformed into a world-class screening room named the Galaxy. Here, a Meyer Sound system based on Acheron screen channel loudspeakers played an instrumental part in creating an environment that left a favorable impression on festival guest director and English writer Geoff Dyer, who selected several film revivals for this year’s event.

“I’ll never forget showing ‘Baraka’ there in 70mm,” says Dyer, who was surprised to learn that Galaxy was not a permanent entity. “The projection was amazing and the sound so incredible, so crisp.”

Film connoisseurs, including esteemed guests from the film industry, are drawn to Telluride every summer for its carefully curated program packed with sneak peeks of new movies as well as Q&A sessions and panels with the filmmakers. In addition to “Baraka,” movies that were heard this year through the Meyer Sound system at the Galaxy included “Argo” by director Ben Affleck, “The Iceman” by Ariel Vromen, “Hyde Park on Hudson” by Roger Michell, and “Frances Ha” by Noah Baumbach.

“There were numerous instances throughout the four-day Telluride Film Festival when a filmmaker would remark how amazing the sound presentation was at the Galaxy theatre,” comments Julie Huntsinger, co-director of the festival. “Ariel Vromen and his colleagues with ‘The Iceman’ were particularly thrilled when they heard their film presented—they couldn’t believe the quality of sound.”

The configuration deployed at the Galaxy included the Acheron screen channel loudspeakers, HMS-10 cinema surround loudspeakers, and X-800C subwoofers. MINA line array loudspeakers provided live sound reinforcement. System implementation was handled by festival staff and Boston Light & Sound.

At the Telluride Film Festival’s 40th anniversary in 2013, Meyer Sound will be supplying sound reinforcement for the Galaxy for the third straight year. Passes will be available beginning March 2013.

www.meyersound.com/news

John Meyer Receives PLASA’s 2012 Gottelier Award; Attributes Company’s Success to Teamwork

Meyer Sound co-founder and CEO John Meyer is honored to be the recipient of the 2012 Gottelier Award at the PLASA Show Awards Ceremony in London on September 10. This significant award is voted for by industry professionals and recognizes exceptional individuals and innovators who enable entertainment technology practitioners to push the boundaries of event production, presentation, and installation.

“For those who grew up in the industry, John Meyer is a true icon, not just in audio but also for those who work in different aspects of live entertainment,” says Matthew Griffiths, CEO and director of events for PLASA. “My background happens to be in theatre, and we’ve been looking up to John Meyer and Meyer Sound technology for many years.

“The Gottelier Award is named in honor of Tony Gottelier, who was a well-respected industry innovator and writer, and he would be very pleased to see this year’s award given to John Meyer,” continues Griffiths.

John Meyer’s career in professional audio spans over 40 years but the majority of his technological achievements and advances have taken place since founding Meyer Sound in 1979 with his wife Helen Meyer. In receiving the award, Meyer acknowledged the importance of collaboration and credited his team for their contributions.

“It’s like a play, where everybody has to do their part,” said Meyer. “I’d like to thank my wife, Helen, who has played a tremendous role in the success of the business, and all the people who support the products that we make. It’s a huge team effort, and I gratefully accept this award on behalf of everybody at Meyer Sound.”

John Meyer launched his career in professional audio in the 1960s by developing custom loudspeaker systems used by the rock luminaries of the San Francisco Bay Area, including the Steve Miller Band, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and the Grateful Dead. After embarking on extensive research into audio transducer linearity at the Institute for Advanced Musical Studies in Montreux, Switzerland, he and Helen Meyer returned to the Bay Area in 1979 to establish Meyer Sound. Over the following decades, John Meyer has led an engineering team that has set new benchmarks for performance and reliability and revolutionized sound reinforcement. He was made a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society in 1985, and was awarded the AES Silver Medal in 2007.

www.meyersound.com/news

At The Owner’s Box Sports Bar in Dallas, Meyer Sound Low-Voltage Systems Plunge Fans into the Game

The Owner’s Box Sports Bar and Grill at the new Omni Dallas Hotel has become the hot-spot for both intense game-watching and socializing in this sports-centric city. As the name implies, the concept here is to give fans a privileged seat and then pull them into the game—a technological feat accomplished by a total of 72 HDTV screens and powerful surround sound systems incorporating 40 Meyer Sound self-powered loudspeakers.

Walker Engineering of Irving, Tex. provided design assistance and installation for the audio, video, and lighting (AVL) systems, with Kip Kendrick, the company’s business development manager for AVL, spearheading conceptual design.

“I’m not a huge sports fan myself,” admits Kendrick, “but I love the feeling I get watching a game on my big screen at home with good surround sound. I knew that if we wanted to bring the fans downtown, we had to offer that same sense of immersion in the game—only better. That was our goal. We aimed for the best sports bar in the world.”

From the outset, Walker Engineering and its partners, general contractor Balfour Beatty Construction and developer Matthews Southwest, agreed that there would be no “value engineering” that would compromise the experience. “We insisted on a stellar environment, and that meant top-line Panasonic video screens, Biamp audio processing and distribution, Crestron controls, and Meyer Sound loudspeakers,” says Kendrick.

Meyer Sound systems are showcased in five premier viewing zones at The Owner’s Box, four of which utilize the new low-voltage self-powered systems. The twin 7.1 bar systems each have a center UP-4XP 48 V loudspeaker, six MM-4XP miniature loudspeakers, and an MM-10 miniature subwoofer. The 7.2 system in the VIP suite uses the same components with an added MM-10, while the 5.1 system for the billiards room has two fewer of the MM-4XP loudspeakers.

“When we looked at what we needed for both functional performance and interior design, Meyer’s low-voltage systems were a no-brainer,” recalls Kendrick. “Their 48 V speaker line is absolutely brilliant for this kind of environment.”

For the big games—Cowboys, Mavericks, Super Bowl—fans flock to the front of the 16-foot screen, where they are swept into the sound of a 7.2 system powered by seven UPA-1P loudspeakers and dual USW-1P subwoofers.

“They brought in a DJ to use that system for New Year’s,” recalls Kendrick, “and during the afternoon tests they had it up well over 115 dB with pure clarity. We had bellhops coming from the front desk 200 yards away to see what was going on.”

Working with Kendrick as project manager was Jerry Roskin, Walker Engineering’s senior project manager for low-voltage and network systems. Creston programming was handled by PanTech Design of Grapevine. Architect for The Owner’s Box was BOKA Powell, LLC., and interior designer was waldrop+nichols studio, llc.

Although AVL for The Owner’s Box was covered under a separate contract, Walker Engineering also was contracted for all electrical, security, networking, and AV systems throughout the hotel. The 1,001-room property, officially named the Dallas Convention Center Hotel, is owned by the City of Dallas and operated by Omni Hotels.

www.meyersound.com/news

Tokyu Theatre Orb Takes Musicals to New Heights with Meyer Sound M’elodie

Dubbed “a musical theatre floating on air,” Tokyu Theatre Orb is nestled inside a stunning glass atrium that sits wedged between the 11th and 16th floors of a new multi-use tower in Tokyo. It is the largest venue of its type in Japan, with a maximum seating capacity of 1,972, and it also boasts a reinforcement system based on Meyer Sound M’elodie line array loudspeakers.

The system was designed to allow maximum flexibility. Array components can be configured as a complete system for local productions or special events, or they can be used to augment systems carried by touring productions. The LCR system offers a fixed center cluster comprising 10 flown M’elodie loudspeakers under a 600-HP subwoofer; the base L and R arrays (flown or ground-stacked) are six-each M’elodie loudspeakers plus a 600-HP subwoofer, with rigging to accommodate additional M’elodie loudspeakers available for rental. The in-house inventory also includes eight UPA-1P and four UPJunior VariO loudspeakers, which can be utilized as needed for monitors, effects, and fills. A Galileo loudspeaker management system provides system drive and processing, while the RMS remote monitoring system allows the audio team to maintain system performance in real time.

The decision to invest in a M’elodie system followed a special demonstration arranged by the project’s principal sound system designer, Tetushi Hirai of Yamaha Sound Systems, Inc., for Mansanori Ijuin of Tokyu Bunkamura, Inc., the venue management group responsible for operation of the theatre. The final decision was further supported by favorable past experiences with Meyer Sound systems at two other theatres also managed by Tokyu Bunkamura, Theatre Cocoon and Orchard Hall.

Meyer Sound’s Japanese distributor, ATL, Inc., assisted Hirai in the specifics of array configuration using the MAPP Online Pro acoustical prediction program. Yamaha Sound Systems, Inc. was responsible for system integration and installation.

“From many successful experiences with other Meyer Sound systems, including M’elodie, we can expect excellent performance from the new system at Theatre Orb,” comments Yashuhito Terada, the venue’s audio director.

The in-house system was used for an opening event at the theatre this summer. The first full production in Theatre Orb was the Broadway classic, West Side Story. The next major touring production on the schedule is a trans-Pacific detour for the national tour of Million Dollar Quartet, an energetic fifties rock’n'roll extravaganza which has packed houses across North America using its own Meyer Sound system.

Theatre Orb is—literally—the centerpiece of Shibuya Hikarie, a high-rise retail, entertainment and commercial project developed by the Tokyu Corporation. It is located in the Shibuya municipality of Tokyo, an area known as a thriving center for fashion, entertainment, and nightlife.

www.meyersound.com/news

Meyer Sound MILO at Lollapalooza Main Stage is “Smooth & Coherent”

For three evenings in July, 45,000-plus fervent fans gathered at the Lollapalooza festival’s Bud Light Stage to hear some of the world’s top musical acts, including Black Sabbath with Ozzy Osbourne, Avicii, Justice, and Franz Ferdinand. To deliver their music with full impact across the 7.5-acre grassy quadrangle, Thunder Audio of Livonia, Mich. assembled a massive sound reinforcement system built around 76 Meyer Sound MILO line array loudspeakers.

“The MILO system sounded phenomenal, as it always does,” comments Thunder’s Gregory Snyder, who served as system designer and project manager for the event. “The FOH mixers for every act were amazed with how smooth and coherent the system was, regardless of levels.”

Anchoring the sound at the stage were dual main hangs of 18 per side MILO loudspeakers, supplemented by outfills of eight MILO loudspeakers each. Low end pumped through 36 700-HP subwoofers while MILO 120, MICA, and M’elodie line array loudspeakers provided, respectively, front, front-out, and center downfill. Eight MILO loudspeakers were hoisted atop each of three delay towers, and the entire system was governed by a Galileo loudspeaker management system with four Galileo 616 processors.

The Meyer Sound rig—along with everyone in attendance—received a thorough drenching from a fierce Saturday afternoon thunderstorm, forcing cancellation of one act at the stage. All other acts performed as scheduled, and to overwhelming audience response.

“They all sounded great, but to be honest I thought Black Sabbath with Ozzy was beyond amazing,” recounts Snyder. “Considering the volumes they were playing, the stereo imaging and clarity were astonishing. It never sounded overdriven.”

With Florence + The Machine, Snyder was impressed by “the precise separation of the instruments and the way her voice fell into the mix.” And with the French DJ duo Justice, he noted how the low end was “punchy and yet smooth, with none of that distorted square wave sound you’ll get sometimes in DJ sets.”

Thunder Audio also provided Avid Profile consoles for FOH and monitors, plus eight Shure 900 Series IEM systems and eight Shure UHF-R wireless microphone systems. Systems tech on the Thunder Audio crew was Erik Rogers.

Lollapalooza producer C3 Presents invited Thunder Audio to bring the MILO rig to Chicago based in large part on the performance of the system at Metallica’s Orion Music + More festival, also produced by C3, which was staged in Atlantic City in June.

www.meyersound.com/news

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