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From Lobby to Sky Bar, Meyer Sound Low-Voltage Systems Enchant Guests at Five-Star Qatar Hotel

Soaring 300 meters over Qatar’s capital of Doha, The Torch Doha—one of the Middle East’s newest five-star hotels—captivates guests with luxury and a flair for aesthetic refinement. Throughout the hotel’s public spaces, the elegant décor is complemented by music that flows through an extensive (yet discreet) installation of 195 Meyer Sound low-voltage self-powered loudspeakers and 55 miniature subwoofers.

“Meyer Sound’s low-voltage systems were the only solution that could meet the stringent requirements for full spectrum audio including extremely compact enclosures, wide frequency response with ultra-low distortion, high SPL-to-size ratio, superior speech intelligibility, custom color finishes, and flexible mounting options,” says system designer and project manager, Pradeep Kumar of Doha-based AVtech, the integrator for all the hotel’s music systems.

A particularly challenging space for controlled, quality sound was a 20-meter high lobby atrium, for which Kumar specified ten MM-4XPD directional self-powered loudspeakers. Other lobby and reception areas are served by MM-4XP self-powered loudspeakers and MM-10 miniature subwoofers.

Ceiling systems throughout the hotel’s Three Sixty revolving restaurant, meeting rooms, health clubs, and business center employ a total of 109 low-voltage Stella-4C loudspeakers, while a quartet of robust UPJunior VariO loudspeakers take care of the lofty cantilevered pool area and the Sky bar. A total of 31 sleek, surface-mount Stella-4 loudspeakers blend with the décor in the sushi restaurant, lounges, and bars, with additional MM-10 subwoofers filling in the lower octaves. A Galileo loudspeaker management system with a Galileo 616 processor optimizes audio response in the acoustically challenging lobby zone.

The low-voltage loudspeakers receive both audio signal and remote DC powering from rack-mount power supplies, featuring two MPS-481 and seven MPS-488HP 48V DC units, as well as 12 Stella-188 18V DC units deployed around the installation.

“The hotel management is extremely happy with the quality of the Meyer Sound system,” Kumar reports. “It was more than they expected. Every detail of the music is crystal clear, even at low levels that allow guests to comfortably engage in conversation.”

“It is a wonderful system,” adds Sherif Sabry, The Torch Doha’s director of sales and marketing. “The sound quality is very high throughout, and we are pleased that there is no echo in the very high lobby atrium.”

In addition to Meyer Sound products, the venue also features an Allen & Heath iDR-8 that handles mixing and matrixing of local audio sources in the meeting rooms, while AV switching is assigned to an Extron SMX System MultiMatrix.

The 167 luxurious rooms of The Torch Doha occupy 17 floors of the Aspire Tower, an iconic symbol built for the 2006 Asian Games held in the surrounding Aspire Zone sports complex. Architect Hadi Simaan, in association with AREP and Ove Arup & Partners engineers, designed the Aspire Tower building. The Torch Doha hotel project—with architecture design by Karim Azzabi and interior design by Artline R+M & Associates of Doha—was completed in 2011.

www.meyersound.com/news

Meyer Sound LEO Unleashed at San Francisco Outside Lands Festival

For three days in August, an estimated 100,000 fans converged at the sold-out Outside Lands festival in San Francisco. With must-sees including Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, Metallica, and Foo Fighters, this year’s impeccable lineup at the Lands End main stage was supported by Meyer Sound’s freshly unveiled LEO large-scale sound reinforcement system. LEO’s exceptional fidelity made an instant impression on many attending industry professionals who encountered LEO for the first time, including Another Planet, producer of Outside Lands.

“Faithfully reproducing music for 65,000 is no easy task, but the Meyer Sound LEO system this year did an incredible job,” states Gregg Perloff, CEO of Another Planet Entertainment. “Legends like Neil Young and Stevie Wonder sounded better than I had ever heard them before, and LEO also made it easy for sound crews to do their job. LEO is definitely raising the bar for how live music should be appreciated.”

To cover the main audience area to a distance well past the first delay tower, more than 275 feet from the stage, sound provider Pro Media/UltraSound of Hercules, Calif. erected two main arrays of 15-each LEO-M loudspeakers at one end of Golden Gate Park’s oval Polo Field. Equally potent bass power was produced through side arrays of 12-each 1100-LFC low-frequency control elements and a center grouping of 10 700-HP subwoofers, all in cardioid configurations. Six MICA line array loudspeakers were used as downfills under the LEO-M arrays, along with dual out fills of 10 MICA loudspeakers each.

Big Mick Hughes, long-time FOH engineer for Metallica, mixed his first live show on a LEO system at this year’s Outside Lands. “The Metallica kick drum uses a considerable amount of high frequencies in order to create the attack required. There are parts in the show where the volume of the kick can hit a typical system’s high-frequency limiters. To my amazement this was not the case with LEO,” says Hughes. “LEO is such a unique animal. I think it’s a really exciting time for people to be able to hear things in this manner for the first time. LEO is going to make engineers expect more from all speaker systems.”

Two delay towers (a second at 500 feet) each held 16 MILO line array loudspeakers as dual hangs of eight, while CQ-1, CQ-2, MSL-4, and UPA-1P loudspeakers were deployed for, respectively, front fill, VIP stands, and a VIP tent. System drive and alignment were supplied by a Galileo Callisto loudspeaker management system with four Callisto 616 and two Galileo 616 processors.

Pro Media/UltraSound also provided a full complement of Meyer Sound MJF-212A stage monitors, dual hangs of five MILO loudspeakers per side as side fills with a pair of 700-HP subs, as well as the Avid D-Show FOH console used by some opening acts. Additional headliner-supplied consoles were by DiGiCo (SD5, SD7, and SD8), Midas (Heritage 3000, XL-8), and Yamaha PM-5D.

Derek Featherstone, Pro Media/UltraSound’s VP of tour and rental division, headed technical planning and coordination. “We were all impressed with how quickly the system came together sonically and how much headroom there was,” says Featherstone. “With this amount of power, the 1100-LFC had no problem keeping up with the LEO-M cabinets.”

Jason Mills served as FOH system engineer; Tom Lyon as system tech; Ian Dubois as crew chief; Tony Norris and Rick Stansby as stage techs; Nick Abru as tower tech; Sean McAdams as PA tech; and Nathan Harlow as overnight system engineer.

www.meyersound.com/news

Meyer Sound Ships Steerable CAL Column Array Loudspeaker

Meyer Sound has begun delivery of its CAL column array loudspeaker this summer. Available in three models, CAL is a self-powered installation product that introduces an unprecedented level of vocal clarity in even the most reverberant environments. The recipients of the first shipments include a collegiate stadium and an indoor auditorium in the US as well as an Australian live performing arts centre.

“CAL is a digitally steerable column array product in which all high-frequency and low-frequency drivers are tight-packed in a bi-amped configuration and are individually amplified and processed,” says John McMahon, executive director of operations and digital products at Meyer Sound. “These engineering details are essential in enabling the beam control needed for a human voice to cut through a highly reverberant acoustic space.”

CAL’s vertical beam can be angled up or down in one-degree increments up to 30 degrees to aim only at target coverage areas without exciting an entire architectural space. Two of the CAL versions, CAL 64 and CAL 96, also include beam-splitting capabilities for applications where a balcony wall may cause undesired reflections.

Video: CAL column array

www.meyersound.com/news

George Relles Sound Controls Low End at Oregon’s Britt Festivals with Meyer Sound 1100-LFC

The crowds got up and danced when George Relles Sound fired up six Meyer Sound 1100-LFC low-frequency control elements—among the first to be shipped—at Britt Festivals in Jacksonville, Ore. The formidable linear bass reinforcement systems, working underneath MICA line arrays, made their debut in early July concerts by Ben Harper and the Dukes of September Rhythm Revue (Donald Fagan, Michael McDonald, and Boz Scaggs).

“The main reason I bought the 1100-LFCs was to get more power with a smaller truck pack,” admits George Relles, owner of the Eugene, Ore.–based rental and installation company. “But I was pleasantly surprised at how good they sound. It’s a quality hard to put into words, but they have a bigger feel, with more warmth and purity.”

Used in place of traditional subwoofers, the 1100-LFC low-frequency control element is a self-powered loudspeaker defined by its sonic linearity in reproducing low-frequency transients at high, continuous levels with very low distortion over an operating range of 28 Hz to 100 Hz.

For the Britt Festivals, 1100-LFC loudspeakers are arranged three per side in a cardioid configuration on the stage. “There’s nowhere else to put the subs,” says Relles, “and that’s often a problem because they’re usually sitting right in front of monitor world. Fortunately, with the 1100-LFC’s linear response, the rear cancellation is astonishing. There’s solid bass 300 feet up the hill, but from behind you can’t really tell if they’re turned on.”

The low-frequency improvements have stimulated crowd enthusiasm and earned positive comments from the first FOH engineers to mix with them.

“I really liked them,” says Joseph Walsh, who was behind the Avid Profile for a non-stop 2.5-hour soulful set by the Dukes of September. “At sound check, when we first turned them on, I looked at my systems tech and said, ‘Wow, these are really tight, right out of the box.’”

The balance of the Meyer Sound system comprises nine MICA line array loudspeakers per side, two each JM-1P and UPA-1P loudspeakers for front fill, a CQ-1 loudspeaker for corner fill, and two UPM-1P loudspeakers for delay. The same basic system will be in place through the rest of the season, with upcoming performances scheduled by—among others—Ziggy Marley, Michael Franti, the Avett Brothers, Diana Krall, Slightly Stoopid, and Huey Lewis and the News.

George Relles Sound has been the principal audio reinforcement provider for the Britt Festivals since 1980, and has employed Meyer Sound systems exclusively since 1986.

“The Britt” (as it is known locally) is the oldest summer performing arts festival in the Pacific Northwest, beginning as a classical-only festival in 1963. The Britt Festival Orchestra remains in residence each August, with an eclectic variety of pop, rock, country, and world music acts taking the stage in June, July, and September.

www.meyersound.com/news

44.1 Supplies Two French Film Post Facilities with Meyer Sound EXP Monitoring

Two of the most in-demand film post-production companies in Paris, Digimage Cinema and Piste Rouge, have recently equipped their key mixing and screening rooms with powerful and low-distortion EXP cinema audio systems from Meyer Sound. The systems were specified and installed by Paris-based 44.1, the leading French systems provider of high-end post-production facilities for film, video, and broadcast.

The EXP system at Digimage Cinema, installed in a screening room dedicated to final checking of new films in various formats, comprises Acheron Studio screen channel loudspeakers, X-800C subwoofers, HMS-10 surround loudspeakers, and a Galileo loudspeaker management system with Galileo 408 processors.

Serge Arthus, sound department manager for Digimage Cinema, noticed the improvements immediately. “There’s more definition at the high end of the spectrum, lower distortion, improved clarity, greater headroom, and very good phase stability,” he observes. “Several clients have commented on the excellent definition and dynamics. One told me, ‘At last, the right sound has been found.’”

At its new facility on the west side of Paris, Piste Rouge also offers its clients the benefits of consistently linear EXP monitoring. Piste Rouge’s larger auditorium 1, used for film mixing and trailers for major French distributors, is equipped with Acheron Studio screen channel loudspeakers, while the smaller auditorium 2 is fitted with the more compact Acheron Designer screen channel loudspeakers. Completing the 7.1-surround capable systems are X-800C cinema subwoofers, HMS-10 surround loudspeakers, and Galileo loudspeaker management systems with Galileo 408 processors.

Paul-Henri Wagner, owner of 44.1, has a long-standing relationship with Digimage and Piste Rouge, having previously supplied both facilities with Avid Euphonix S5 mixing consoles.

Established in 1985, and taking its name from the sampling frequency of the then-new compact disc, 44.1 has since grown to become a leading system integrator for film, video, and multimedia enterprises. The list of clients served by 44.1 includes the top tier of French broadcast networks, film studios, post-productions houses, recording studios, and live event production companies. 44.1 was appointed as a French dealer for Meyer Sound EXP systems earlier this year.

EXP monitoring systems have been installed at renowned facilities such as Skywalker Sound, Wildfire Studios, and American Zoetrope, as well as De Lane Lea in London. EXP has also gained widespread acceptance as the ideal complement to 3D digital cinema at theatres across North America, Asia, and Europe, including 60 screens at CinemaxX in Germany and Denmark.

www.meyersound.com/news

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University of Texas Arlington Chooses Meyer Sound for College Park Center Arena

College Park Center at University of Texas Arlington has installed a spectacular distributed audio system featuring more than 30 Meyer Sound loudspeakers. The 218,000-square-foot venue, which hosts university sports, concerts, speakers, commencement ceremonies, and more, anchors the emerging 20-acre College Park District and is stimulating a revitalization of downtown Arlington.

Austin-based acoustics and AV consultant BAi, LLC was hired by the University of Texas at Arlington and the architect, HKS, to design the sound reinforcement systems as well as distributed television and scoreboard systems. Grand Prairie, Tex.-based integrator ABLe Communications was contracted by Hunt Construction to implement the systems.

“What the project comes down to is a very well-designed system that was in turn installed per specifications. It ended up being a fantastic system,” says James Wicker, ABLe Communications senior project manager, who had long experience with Meyer Sound at his previous company, Chicago-based dB Integrated Systems.

“Having used Meyer products a lot in the past,” adds Bill Hammon, BAi senior associate, “we were confident in the performance, and this didn’t disappoint.”

The system is comprised of 22 CQ-2 loudspeakers; four CQ-1 loudspeakers; four UPA-1P loudspeakers; and two 500-HP subwoofers. “A lot of time was spent on the front end with the engineering,” Wicker adds, “and making sure that the locations were right, having to work with the lighting and rigging and everything that’s up in the ceiling. When BAi came out for commissioning, we didn’t have to re-aim one speaker: the coverage was phenomenal. This is one of the best-sounding arenas I’ve ever been in.”

The inaugural event at the College Park Center was a concert by hip-hop superstar Drake. “We got a letter from the owner after their first event,” says Hammon. “Apparently it was very loud, and they were very impressed that it remained so clear at high levels.”

www.meyersound.com/news

With Meyer Sound JM-1P, the Power Difference is Clear at Kentucky’s Hillvue Heights Church

When Hillvue Heights Church of Bowling Green, Ky. installed a new Meyer Sound reinforcement system based on JM-1P arrayble loudspeakers, the sermon and music no longer sounded the same.

“Some ladies heard it immediately,” recalls Marc Owens, audio coordinator for the church. “They came up after the eight o’clock service and asked, ‘Now, what did you do to the sound? I can understand every word the preacher is saying now, and I couldn’t understand hardly anything before.’”

At the later up-tempo services for younger congregants, intelligibility couples with sheer power as the new system kicks into high gear. “I can peel the paint if I want to,” admits Owens, whose career in audio includes mixing for touring country notables and operation of Bowling Green’s premier recording studio. “We’re hitting up to 115 dB in here now, but nobody complains because it doesn’t hurt—as often it would with the old boxes.”

Bruce Bossert of Nashville-based Mid-Coast & Performance Audio, Inc., supplier of the Meyer Sound system, is also pleased by the power handling of the JM-1P. “It’s a rock ‘n’ roll system in a rock ‘n’ roll church,” says Bossert. “It hits hard and it still has tons of headroom left.” Bossert facilitated the installation, with Duane Tabinski providing on-site project management.

At the system’s core are left and right arrays of four each JM-1P loudspeakers, which cover most of the main floor seats in the roughly 1,500-capacity multipurpose auditorium. Solid bass kicks out from four under-stage 600-HP subwoofers, a down-firing UPA-2P loudspeaker fills in the center, two UPQ-2P loudspeakers handle out fill, and the wide balcony is covered by two UPA-2P and four UPA-1P delay loudspeakers. A number of MM-4XP miniature self-powered loudspeakers are installed, including six for under-balcony fill and eight for front fill, and two HD-1 monitors sits at FOH mix. A Galileo loudspeaker management system with two Galileo 616 processors provides system drive and processing.

“This was my first install with the JM-1P, and I was extremely impressed with its tone quality and power,” remarks Tabinski. “It has outstanding vocal clarity, and it was definitely the right box for the job. When the system was complete and tuned, the sound in the room was seamless. But then nothing I’ve done with Meyer has ever left me wanting. I’m a big fan!”

Marc Owens credits the church’s worship pastor, Keith Scarborough, as the one with the original vision to aim for a Meyer Sound solution. From there, system design and loudspeaker selection was a collaborative effort on the part of Owens, Bossert, and Tabinski in consultation with Meyer Sound Design Services. Final tuning was accomplished using the SIM 3 audio analyzer.

The new system takes on a full plate of duties. In addition to the Sunday and Wednesday church services, the auditorium hosts community meetings, graduations, children’s shows, and concerts—TobyMac was one of the first to perform using the new system.

www.meyersound.com/news

Meyer Sound Upgrade Caters to Worldly Ambience at Flagship Buddha-Bar Paris

When Parisian entrepreneur Raymond Visan opened the original Buddha-Bar in 1996, he launched a fusion of dining and entertainment that awakened and satisfied the senses—an experience that blossomed into a global hospitality phenomenon. To underscore its status as the premiere location, Buddha-Bar Paris recently installed new Meyer Sound systems to present its wide-ranging musical atmosphere with consistent, crystal-clear quality.

“At Buddha-Bar, our sonic signature is a subtle combination of world and electro-ethnic music,” observes Franck Fortet, vice president for development at George V Eatertainment, the parent firm of Buddha-Bar. “It’s an infinity of sounds that requires the perfect sound system, and the effect as distilled through the new Meyer system has made a remarkable difference at Buddha-Bar Paris.”

The Buddha-Bar systems were designed and installed by John Pouzet of Paris-based Sonosystem, with design assistance from Cyril Ubersfeld of Meyer Sound’s French distributor, Best Audio. Resident DJ is Ravin.

“I specified a Meyer system to realize a particular sound quality with detailed resolution that goes beyond the ordinary,” Pouzet explains. “We wanted a sonic character that evoked warmth, and even mystery, something only a Meyer system could do in this space.”

The main restaurant, with tables spread beneath the gaze of a serene Buddha, is an acoustically challenging space with high ceilings. Here, dynamic musical energy permeates the room via eight UPJ-1P VariO loudspeakers, while solid bass fundamentals exude from dual USW-1P subwoofers underneath the Buddha statue. To assure uniform low frequencies at all tables, seven MM-10 miniature subwoofers are concealed in banquettes. The overall audio response of the space is optimized by a Galileo loudspeaker management system with one Galileo 616 processor.

The intimate Red Room employs eight discreet UP-4XP loudspeakers augmented by two MM-10 subwoofers, again placed under banquettes. For the upper level bar and lounge alcoves, Pouzet specified a dozen strategically placed UPM-1P loudspeakers, with bass boosted by four M1D-Sub and two UMS-1P subwoofers in the larger spaces and around the bar. The live DJ controls his own Meyer Sound monitor rig, comprising dual UPM-1P loudspeakers and a close-proximity MM-10 subwoofer.

According to Fortet, Meyer Sound has become a key partner in refining the remarkably successful “eatertainment” concept. “We are thrilled to collaborate with Meyer Sound, not just in Paris but also at other locations around the world,” he says. “We have worked hard to create our own musical signature, and Meyer continues to collaborate with us in improving on the optimum rendition of sound.”

In addition to the Paris retrofit, Meyer Sound systems have been installed at the two newest Buddha-Bar locations in Mexico City and Manila, as well as at two other George V Eatertainment locations: Little Buddha in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt and Barrio Latino in Paris.

www.meyersound.com/news

Canegreen Supports Tony Bennett, George Benson, Paul Weller, and More with Meyer Sound

Canegreen, a part of the SSE Audio Group, is providing Meyer Sound equipment to multiple legendary artists as the summer touring season heats up. A dealer and provider of Meyer Sound for more than 25 years, this year sees Canegreen/SSE Audio Group supporting artists as diverse as Tony Bennett, George Benson, Paul Weller, and newcomer Jessie J. The common denominator, of course, is Meyer Sound.

Another aspect that links current Canegreen/SSE clients: many of them are performing at London’s Royal Albert Hall, which hosted the annual BluesFest in June and for which Canegreen/SSE provided a Meyer Sound system.

The Royal Albert Hall, says Canegreen/SSE Director Yan Stile, is a notoriously challenging environment for front-of-house engineers. “The nature of the building,” he explains, “is its 360-degree coverage. It’s a really difficult place to cover.” For BluesFest 2012, Canegreen provided a Meyer Sound system comprised of 28 MILO, four MILO 120, 32 MICA, and six M’elodie line array loudspeakers; six 700-HP subwoofers; and two Galileo loudspeaker management systems.

Benson performed at the Royal Albert Hall on June 28 with the support of Canegreen, which has also provided the legendary guitarist a touring rig featuring 24 MICA and six M’elodie line array loudspeakers; 10 700-HP and one USW-1P subwoofers; two MSL-4 loudspeakers; 10 MJF-212A stage monitors; and a Galileo loudspeaker management system.

Bennett performed at the Royal Albert Hall on June 30 and July 1. His touring rig includes 24 MICA line array loudspeakers, four 600-HP subwoofers, and two UPA-1P loudspeakers.

www.meyersound.com/news

Meyer Sound Libra and Constellation “Tune the Buzz” at Berkeley’s New Comal Restaurant

Comal, a new restaurant located in Berkeley’s lively downtown Arts District, is the first establishment of its kind to create an optimized aural environment using the new Libra acoustic image system and complementary Constellation active acoustic system from Meyer Sound. This unprecedented ability to dynamically control the sonic ambience of the space has garnered the attention of publications like San Francisco Chronicle and Fast Company. With a touch on an iPad screen, Comal’s management can maintain the desired level of energized “buzz” throughout the space while still allowing intimate conversations, all regardless of occupancy levels.

For Comal owner John Paluska, who became a restaurateur after 17 years of managing the rock band Phish, the importance of sound in the dining experience has moved to the forefront. “It’s a hot-button issue in the restaurant world these days,” he says. “Noise is one of the top complaints in reviews and surveys. At Comal, we don’t want a space that is hushed and dead-sounding. We want it festive, but never overbearing.”

To achieve that ideal balance at Comal, Meyer Sound engineers first controlled the baseline acoustics using, in part, the patent-pending Libra acoustic image system, installed here for the very first time. Custom-designed with stunning imagery under the artistic direction of Deborah O’Grady, the visually striking Libra panels dampen difficult reverberant spaces using tailored combinations of fabric types, frame depth, and underlying acoustical absorption.

To actively control the depth and texture of ambient sound—both conversation and foreground music—the Meyer Sound team then added the Constellation acoustic system. Constellation picks up a room’s ambient sound and, after applying the patented VRAS reverberation algorithm, regenerates an enhanced wash of sound throughout the space at the optimum levels. Three presets, adjustable via an iPad, are provided to adjust for changing occupancy levels. The restaurant can also heighten the “buzz” around the bar and lower it for the guests in the dining areas.

Designed as a proof of concept, the complete system covering Comal’s 3,000-square-foot indoor area utilizes a sizeable complement of 38 UPJunior VariO and 45 MM-4XP loudspeakers, 12 MM-10 miniature subwoofers, and 28 microphones distributed around the restaurant. Digital processing is hosted by the Meyer Sound D-Mitri digital audio platform. The system was installed by BugID of San Francisco.

“I use the analogy of a portrait photo taken with shallow depth of field,” explains Paluska, describing the system’s effect. “Up close, the image is sharply detailed, while behind it there is a pleasantly textured but undefined setting. That’s the sound environment here. We’re creating sonic microclimates, where people in proximity can converse easily, yet we still have an energetic buzz in the atmosphere. It’s always convivial, but it doesn’t distract or exhaust you.”

In addition to the main dining and bar area, the rest of Comal features a sound reinforcement system of 14 UP-4XP and two UPJ-1P VariO loudspeakers, and MM-10 subwoofers installed in its hallway and its 2,500-square-foot enclosed patio. Comal was designed by Abueg Morris Architects. Cuisine is regional Mexican, focused on Oaxaca and nearby coastal states.

Deborah O’Grady, artistic director for the Libra acoustic image system, is an internationally known landscape photographer whose work is currently on view at the Public Policy Institute of California and the San Francisco Design Center. Previous exhibitions include installations in Walt Disney Concert Hall, Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C., Internationale Fototage in Mannheim, Germany, and Encuentros Abiertos photography festival in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her photographs of the Navajo Code Talkers will be released this fall by Rio Nuevo Publishers.

www.meyersound.com/news

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