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Archive by Renkus-Heinz

Authentic Renkus-Heinz Sound for Authentic Irish Pub

New York, NY – October 2012….. Manhattan has no shortage of Irish-themed pubs, but Tir Na Nog on 39th Street is truly a cut above. Step in out of the bustling midtown traffic and you’re instantly transported to a High Street local in Galway or Cork. The décor is at once authentic and unconventional, right down to the LED-laden 300-year-old Irish rowboat, replete with fishing net, on the ceiling.

“The owner, Tony Colbert, owns several Irish pubs and takes immense pride in the design of each of them,” explains Rich Trombitas of Cornwall, NY-based Cardone, Soloman and Associates. “He imports woodwork that’s been salvaged from churches built in Ireland in the 1700s and 1800s, then they design the individual detail to fit the space, and the woodwork is all done by master carpenters. The architecture and décor is simply magnificent – it all looks like it’s been there for centuries.”

Trombitas says the owner was adamant that equal attention be paid to the pub’s audio system, which includes a cross-section of Renkus-Heinz TRX and CFX Series loudspeakers as well as PNX and BPS subwoofers. “Tony made it clear that he wanted more than just background music,” he says. “He wanted a system that sounded consistently great no matter where you’re sitting, and blended seamlessly with the design of the place.”

The system, installed by veteran AV firm Starview Satellite of Rego Park, NY, is divided into numerous zones, with a primary focus on the main dining area and the pub’s expansive and ornate bar, bridging the space from front to back. Sound to the main dining area is handled by eight TRX81 two-way 8-inch loudspeakers. A pair of PNX112 subwoofers recessed into the walls provides extra low end punch.

The bar is divided into two zones, with five more TRX81 units and a built-in BPS12-1 sub covering the front bar area. The rear bar uses four TRX81s and another BPS12-1 sub. Powersoft amplification drives the system.

“The coverage of the TRX-Series aligns perfectly with what we needed to accomplish in this space,” says Trombitas. “The rotatable horn enabled us to mount the units either vertically or horizontally, depending on what worked better in that particular space.”

Ringing the dining area are individual booths, sporting massive 18-inch thick stone walls and burnt beams. “The design is an homage to Irish society at the height of the depression,” Trombitas explains. “The upper class gentry and the peasants can see each other, but there’s a space separating them.”

CFX41 compact 4-inch two-way coaxial boxes are mounted over the booths for added reinforcement. “Their level is down pretty low, about 8dB lower than the mains, just to fill in the mids and highs when the place is crowded,” says Trombitas.

Trombitas reports owner Tony Colbert is truly pleased with the audio quality. “He walked around the entire bar and said ‘it’s absolutely exactly the same, no matter where I go,’ and declared it the best sounding system he’d ever heard in a bar.” And Trombitas adds, “This is probably one of the most architecturally interesting and diverse pub projects I’ve ever been involved in.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

Handing Down the History of the Casa Grande Ruins

Coolidge, AZ – October 2012…..  Less than an hour south of downtown Phoenix lies the Casa Grande Ruins, one of America’s oldest prehistoric and cultural preserves. Built by the Pueblo peoples who farmed the Gila Valley in the early 13th century, the ruins include the remains of several ancient Hohokam structures, as well as elaborate irrigation systems. The largest of these structures is a massive four-story edifice whose adobe walls have withstood the harsh desert climate for more than 700 years.

Designated a national monument in 1918, the grounds are protected and preserved by the National Parks Service. In the late 1930s the Civilian Conservation Corps built a handful of administrative buildings adjacent to the ruins, using traditional rammed earth techniques similar to those used in the original structures.

Little has changed since 1940, until now. Designed and built by Phoenix firm Nagaki Design Build Associates, the newly expanded Visitors Center recently opened its doors. Those touring the ruins can now begin their journey by immersing themselves in a powerful video presentation that teaches them about the history of the ruins, and of the tribes who built them.

The center includes a modestly sized multi-purpose theater, outfitted with state-of-the-art HD video and full surround sound. Designed and installed by Muncie, Indiana-based No Limits AV, the audio system utilizes five Renkus-Heinz CF-Series loudspeakers. Three CFX81 two-way 8-inch speakers cover system’s left, right, and center channels, while the surrounds are handled by a pair of CFX61 two-way 6 1/2 -inch speakers.

“We’ve done a number of projects in our National Parks, and we’ve used Renkus-Heinz loudspeakers on several,” explains Brent Gardiner, No Limits AV’s Lead Technician. “This particular theater was similar in size and scope to another theater we’d recently completed. We liked the way the Renkus-Heinz speakers performed, with good sound and good intelligibility. We liked the way they looked, and we liked the ease with which they installed. So it made sense to use it again on this project.”

The theater is also used for live presentations, including local historians and visiting professors, covering such topics as Native American artwork, desert flora and fauna, and other related subjects. The system is set up to easily accommodate input from a laptop computer or other presentation source.

Gardiner says the theater’s rammed earth walls added an interesting element to the room’s acoustics. “The architect’s vision was to convey the experience of coming inside the big adobe house, and the earthen walls have a significantly higher R value (insulation) than modern drywall,” he explains. “Acoustically, the walls are naturally very absorbent, and the system sounds even better than we had anticipated.”

“It’s a really interesting place,” Gardiner concludes. “People come away from there with a new understanding of the history of these peoples. It’s a great feeling to know we’ve helped to connect them with that knowledge.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

Iconyx Tames the Modern Art of Denver’s Clyfford Still Museum

Denver, CO – October 2012…  One of the giants in post-WWII American painting, Clyfford Still dropped out of the commercial art world in 1951. When he died in 1980, he willed entire collection to an American city willing to create a permanent home for it.

More than three decades later, the Clyfford Still Museum opened its doors in downtown Denver. The 28,000-square-foot steel and concrete building houses more than 2400 of Still’s works, as well as a collection of the artist’s journals, sketchbooks and archives.

Visitors enter the museum through a massive glass-lined lobby whose windows extend from its tiled floors to its concrete ceiling. The strikingly beautiful architecture, while visually stunning, creates a highly reverberant acoustical environment that is anything but conducive to the large-screen video presentation that runs in the museum’s entry.

Denver-based Empowercom was retained by the museum’s planning commission to address the lobby’s challenging acoustics. As Empowercom’s Vice President Terri Jackson explains, the selection of Renkus-Heinz’s Iconyx steerable array loudspeakers was a logical choice.

“The content management committee on the project had suggested the Iconyx system, and everyone involved unanimously agreed they were the only speakers that would meet the needs of the space,” says Jackson. “Being able to steer the sound away from the abundance of reflective surfaces was key. Using the Iconyx, we were able to focus the sound to a concentrated area directly in front of the screen, rather than create a cacophony across the entire lobby.”

Jackson adds, “The program material contains both narration and music, and the Iconyx delivers on both spoken word intelligibility and musical performance.”

The Iconyx’s low profile design also helped to make it an ideal fit, says Jackson. “It’s a very high-end space, and the Iconyx really fits in with the décor,” she notes. “It’s an elegant, low-profile design that actually blends with the surroundings.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

Iconyx Brings Clarity to US Capitol Rotunda

Washington, DC – October 2012… America’s capitol city is rich in history, and one of its most revered landmarks is the United States Capitol building. Thousands of people tour the Capitol each day, and for most their visit includes the vast Central Rotunda.

Connecting both houses of Congress, the Rotunda has been described as the “symbolic and physical heart” of the Capitol, and is used as a backdrop for public and ceremonial events. At 96 feet (29m) in diameter, and just over 180 feet (55 m) high at its peaked canopy, it’s not hard to imagine the type of acoustical challenges the space presents.

“It’s always been a problematic space,” says Tom Jones, Engineer with Baltimore, MD-based Design and Integration, Inc. “It’s got about a nine second reverb time, and vocal intelligibility is just a mess.”

Needless to say, given the building’s landmark status, there was no room for any sound system design that would alter the venue’s aesthetic. “Requirement number one was that nothing could be mounted permanently,” says Jones. Design and Integration’s solution was to create a portable system that could be quickly and easily moved into place, based around Renkus-Heinz Iconyx digitally steerable arrays.

“They don’t hold high-profile events more than once or twice a month, but when they do it’s usually top-level government officials – in the past that has included the Vice-President, the Speaker of the House, or a visiting dignitary,” Jones explains. “The events are televised on C-Span, so they really need a system that’s highly intelligible with low visibility.”

The system comprises four Iconyx IC16-R-II arrays, each located at 90 degrees apart along the room’s circumference. “One of the requirements was that the speakers had to be located at the perimeter, to be out of view of audience and cameras,” says Jones. “The Iconyx was great – very narrow and low-profile.”

Setting up the Iconyx cabinets on tripods and positioning them is a quick and simple procedure, says Jones. “We’ve tuned the beams downward, at ear level with the seating, and away from the walls and dome.”

Aside from the Rotunda’s acoustics, Jones says another challenge in putting together the sound system is simple logistics. “The space is a major tourist attraction, and at any given time you’ve got literally hundreds of people walking through there,” he explains. “When we were doing the demo, we had a five minute window right after closing at 5:00 PM, So we were setting up the system while the place was packed with tourists.”

Adjacent the Rotunda to the south is the National Statuary Hall, a semi-circular space that was the House of Representatives chamber until 1857. As Jones observes, the Iconyx system’s portability enables them to set it up in the Statuary Hall just as easily. “We’re using a similar configuration, but iIt’s a smaller space and a bit less reverberant, and we can cover the whole space with a pair of Iconyx cabinets. We’ve set up presets so they can easily choose the space they want.”

Jones reports the system has been a tremendous improvement. “The intelligibility factor is far superior to anything they’ve used in there in the past,” he says. “And being able to cover the entire space with only four self-contained systems is a huge time-saver.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems. 

 

Iconyx Helps Renew Reno Church

Reno, NV – September 2012….  The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd built their first sanctuary in downtown Reno in 1951. Over the years the church’s congregation has grown steadily, straining the limits of their small facility. Now, after more than 60 years the church has been rewarded with a new 500-seat worship center, directly adjacent to the original sanctuary.

The new facility is big, bright and airy, with an open feel and modern audio and video systems, including a pair of Iconyx IC Live digitally steered line array systems from Renkus-Heinz. As Scott Schmidt of Reno-based JC Productions explains, they were fortunate to have the room’s acoustics working for, rather than against them.

“The architect who designed the space has done a number of traditional sanctuaries, and really did a fantastic job,” says Schmidt. “Most of the walls are not parallel, and there’s a sloped ceiling that’s about 60 feet at its highest point. The wall behind the choir is angled about five degrees, which really helps with reflectivity.”

Like many of today’s churches, Good Shepherd has been expanding outside the traditional Lutheran model and offering a range of services to cater to a wider congregation. “They offer a traditional Lutheran service early in the morning, followed by a more contemporary service with full band, and then one more traditional service,” says Schmidt.

Good Shepherd’s choir is among the best, and the room’s acoustics only serve to enhance the sound. That said, the same acoustics that work so well for congregational singing can become problematic when you add amplified music to the mix.

“The band is using all amplified instruments, running through the PA, and they’re all using in-ear monitors, so that does help keep the sound under control somewhat,” says Schmidt “They’re using electronic drums, and there are no amplifiers onstage. But it’s still a pretty live space, and they needed a sound system that could steer the acoustical energy away from the walls and into the seating area.”

Schmidt opted for a pair of IC Live ICL-FR columns, mounted on either side of the proscenium. Low-frequency reinforcement is covered by an IC215S-FR subwoofer under the stage lip. “We needed a very versatile system, and the IC Live fit the bill,” he explains. “Spoken word intelligibility is always the priority, but the system had to provide the full-range musicality needed for a live band as well.”

Schmidt concludes, “I’ve done a number of projects using Renkus-Heinz speakers over the past ten years, and have always been happy with the results. I used the Iconyx on a recent job – a corporate training room – and felt it would be a good solution for a situation like this, where we couldn’t  use any acoustical treatment. And it was definitely a good choice – the sound in here is terrific.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

Bridgestone Technical Center Gets Great Sound with Iconyx

Akron, Ohio, September 2012… Akron, Ohio has a long and storied history as the heart of the US tire business. In April of 2012 the city celebrated that proud heritage with the grand opening of Bridgestone Americas’ 260,000-square-foot worldwide technical center. The USD $100m research and development facility was designed by architects Harris/Day to exceed Gold LEED standards, and it shows. The building features wide, open spaces, a “living roof” with gardens and lounge areas, and plenty of natural light thanks to an abundance of glass throughout.

The showcase structure’s east and west wings intersect at a massive three-story atrium area that serves as building’s social nexus. The common space is outfitted with a large video wall, and serves as the hub of the technical center’s communications with the outside world, and with the company’s headquarters in Tennessee.

Of course, three stories of glass, while visually stunning, tends to create a less than optimal acoustical setting. As Gary Matthews of Middleburg Heights, OH-based Audio Video Interiors explains, even with a fair amount of acoustical treatment, the environment was a challenging one.

“It’s a big, open, reverberant space,” he says. “They did a great job in treating the back wall, which helps a lot, but it’s still a large, glassed-in space, with a high level of ambient noise, and intelligibility inevitably suffers.”

The architect’s vision included a desire for low-profile audio and video components, but the design was at odds with that goal. “Their original proposal was for 34 individual loudspeakers hung on walls and on ceilings throughout the area,” says Matthews. “They came to us and asked if there was anything they could do differently, because they didn’t want to see so many speakers.”

AVI’s  recommendation was for three Renkus-Heinz Iconyx steered steered arrays to cover the entire area. “So we got it down from 34 speakers, to three Iconyx ICX7 units built into the video wall, with zero visibility. And the sound coverage is far superior, with no distribution issues and no dead spots.”

With an Ashly Pêma 8×8 amplifier and signal processor already in place, AVI opted for the ICX7 passive system instead of the powered version. “We built pockets for them in the walls, and you can’t even see that they’re there,” says Matthews. A Listen Technologies assistive listening system and a pair of Shure SLX wireless mic systems completes the audio system.

“The Iconyx system was perfect for aiming the sound only at the areas we wanted to cover, and away from the walls and windows,” Matthews concludes.

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

 

 

Iconyx Helps St. Joseph Parish Focus the Message

Needham, MA, September 2012…  St Joseph Parish has been a part of this community for more than 100 years, beginning with a humble wooden church in 1894 and expanding its campus over the years to include a convent, elementary and middle schools, and a range of ministries. In 1966, having outgrown its existing sanctuary, the church completed construction of their current building.

The space has served them well for more than four decades, though there have always been sonic challenges. The room’s architecture provides good acoustics for the traditional choir and organ arrangements, but the sanctuary’s spoken word intelligibility left a bit to be desired.

“It’s a rectangular space with a flat ceiling and lots of right angles,” explains Zeke Zola, Install Manager at Boston Light and Sound, the company behind the design-build project. The walls are all brick and there’s minimal acoustical dampening other than carpeting in the aisles. So it’s a rather reverberant space, and they’ve always struggled with intelligibility and coverage.”

The church’s sound system had evolved in piecemeal fashion over several years, and included a distributed system along the walls that created more problems than it solved. “They had no loudspeakers at the front of the room, but three or four along the side walls, and they were not time-aligned,” says Zola. “So you were getting the sound from the front, mixed with the sounds from two or three different loudspeakers, depending on where you were sitting, and the result was just kind of unnatural and echo-y, with no real directionality.”

Boston Light & Sound’s recommendation was to replace the distributed system with two Iconyx digitally steerable column array loudspeakers from Renkus-Heinz. A single Iconyx IC16-R-II column mounted on either side of the proscenium covers the entire sanctuary. “Using the Iconyx, we can control the beam for very narrow coverage, and minimize the amount of reflected sound from the ceiling and back wall.”

The choir is picked up by wired Clock Audio mics flown overhead, while Shure wired and RF microphones cover the podium and stage. The mics feed a Symetrix 780 Automixer, connected directly to the Iconyx systems.

“The Iconyx has made all the difference in the world in this sanctuary,” Zola concludes. “Coverage is even and intelligible across the entire room, and it even cuts through their very noisy HVAC system. It’s a great solution.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

 

Bridgestone Technical Center Gets Great Sound with Iconyx

Akron, Ohio, September 2012… Akron, Ohio has a long and storied history as the heart of the US tire business. In April of 2012 the city celebrated that proud heritage with the grand opening of Bridgestone Americas’ 260,000-square-foot worldwide technical center. The USD $100m research and development facility was designed by architects Harris/Day to exceed Gold LEED standards, and it shows. The building features wide, open spaces, a “living roof” with gardens and lounge areas, and plenty of natural light thanks to an abundance of glass throughout.

The showcase structure’s east and west wings intersect at a massive three-story atrium area that serves as building’s social nexus. The common space is outfitted with a large video wall, and serves as the hub of the technical center’s communications with the outside world, and with the company’s headquarters in Tennessee.

Of course, three stories of glass, while visually stunning, tends to create a less than optimal acoustical setting. As Gary Matthews of Middleburg Heights, OH-based Audio Video Interiors explains, even with a fair amount of acoustical treatment, the environment was a challenging one.

“It’s a big, open, reverberant space,” he says. “They did a great job in treating the back wall, which helps a lot, but it’s still a large, glassed-in space, with a high level of ambient noise, and intelligibility inevitably suffers.”

The architect’s vision included a desire for low-profile audio and video components, but the design was at odds with that goal. “Their original proposal was for 34 individual loudspeakers hung on walls and on ceilings throughout the area,” says Matthews. “They came to us and asked if there was anything they could do differently, because they didn’t want to see so many speakers.”

AVI’s  recommendation was for three Renkus-Heinz Iconyx steered steered arrays to cover the entire area. “So we got it down from 34 speakers, to three Iconyx ICX7 units built into the video wall, with zero visibility. And the sound coverage is far superior, with no distribution issues and no dead spots.”

With an Ashly Pêma 8×8 amplifier and signal processor already in place, AVI opted for the ICX7 passive system instead of the powered version. “We built pockets for them in the walls, and you can’t even see that they’re there,” says Matthews. A Listen Technologies assistive listening system and a pair of Shure SLX wireless mic systems completes the audio system.

“The Iconyx system was perfect for aiming the sound only at the areas we wanted to cover, and away from the walls and windows,” Matthews concludes.

###

Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

AFMG and Renkus-Heinz Transition with EASE

Foothill Ranch, CA and Berlin, Germany…. Renkus-Heinz and Ahnert Feistel Media Group (AFMG Technologies GmbH) have announced the restructuring of their long-standing strategic relationship, with AFMG stepping into a more prominent role.

AFMG will provide direct sales, technical support and training worldwide for their acclaimed acoustical measurement and simulation software products including EASE, EASERA and SysTune. Renkus-Heinz will continue to offer support to customers during the transition beginning on October 1, 2012. Both companies will keep working together in educational seminars, marketing of technology solutions as well as software development and other projects.

AFMG’s Berlin offices, which already provide support for Europe including Russia, the Middle East, Africa and India, will take on this role globally. On hand to cover the Americas will be Bruce Olson and Charlie Hughes from the US branch of AFMG. Additionally, AFMG representatives and distribution partners will provide local assistance as well.

“The relationship between AFMG and Renkus-Heinz goes back more than 20 years, and will continue well into the future,” remarked Renkus-Heinz President Harro Heinz. “As AFMG keeps growing, the company is ideally suited to provide the best support for their products, and we stand behind their decision to do so.”

“Renkus-Heinz has always been one of our biggest supporters,” added AFMG’s Managing Director Stefan Feistel. “The enthusiasm and professional attitude of Harro Heinz and his team  helped us get on the road in our early years for which we are deeply thankful.  Our companies will continue to have a great working relationship in future projects.”

The transition beginning October 1, 2012 will be seamless to all AFMG customers, with Renkus-Heinz continuing to provide assistance as needed, and AFMG taking on all functions effective January 1, 2013.

For full information on AFMG products, go to http://AFMG.eu

Pricing and ordering information can be found directly at http://www.afmg.eu/index.php/pricelist-en.html .

Customers in the Americas and neighboring time zones can reach AFMG´s US support at support-us@afmg.eu

or dial toll-free 855-411-AFMG (855-411-2364)
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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

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IC Live Turns The Tables For Oslo’s Modern Church

Oslo, Norway, September 2012… The Sofiemyr church in Oslo is a striking modern building, with bare brick walls, a tiled floor and wooden ceiling. Light pours in from a huge stained glass window and other windows in the corners.

The audio solution, supplied by Benum A/S, is equally striking, with a pair of inverted IC Live arrays, flown from the ceiling alongside the matching subwoofers, above a small performance stage. The technique has been used before – England’s Stage Audio Services was possibly first to experiment with it, flying a pair of IC Live arrays upside down at trim height for a standup comedy tour of UK theatres, which allowed the beams to be angled at the ground floor audience as well as the balconies. But this is almost certainly the world’s first permanent installation to use the configuration, which has many benefits in a tall space.

Geir Kristoffersen, manager of the consulting department of COWI for Acoustics and Electro Acoustics, Sound and Vision, who designed the system for the church and frequently mixes it, explains: “This room is a cube, essentially, 16 by 16 metres with a height of about 12 metres, so it’s very interesting acoustically. But it’s turned 90 degrees so that you get some angles towards the speakers.” Slots in the ceiling provide low frequency absorption.

Although on the face of it a highly reverberant space, the actual reverb time is just 1.7 seconds with a very well controlled low end. “But still, 1.7 seconds is significant,” he points out. However, the bare brick walls are an inevitable challenge in view of their capability to deliver slapback echo to the stage.

The church is also equipped with a pipe organ, which is quite frequently played together with a band and a grand piano, as well as a movable pulpit, which is taken out during modern-style worship services.

“The loudspeaker system is flown in the form of a pair of Renkus-Heinz IC Lives,” says Kristoffersen. “We’re very happy with the sound of it. In fact, I’ve never worked with a system that’s so easy and quick to get good sound out of,” he says.

“It works exceptionally well for this kind and size of room and with such a wide variety of music. Together with the choir, we often have a worship team of eight people singing with their vocal microphones. Last Sunday, for example, the choir was seated directly in front of the loudspeakers and I had my measurement system at the desk and I was pumping 90db A weighted but flat out it was giving 101dB. Yet there was no issue with feedback,” he continues.”With these digitally steerable arrays we get tightly controlled beams, which allow us to deflect the sound away from these noisy brick walls,” he explains, adding, “While there is some reverberation, of course, if you shoot straight into these walls then you’d have a big problem with slapback.”

The system is configured with two beams from each IC Live, one pair aimed at the front part of the congregation, the others at the rear. The result, says Kristoffersen, “is that the sound is completely uniform wherever you are standing or sitting.”

“What I like the most about this system – and I’ve worked with good systems all my life – is that because it’s a true line array and not a banana hang it creates a cylindrical wave, which means that it doesn’t excite the room as much as a traditional three-box system, which would have been our obvious alternative,” he says, and adds, “Another thing is that, with a choir, the choir bench is high, which means the microphones are right in front of the loudspeakers, yet we have never had any feedback problems. Because it’s so even sounding across the frequency spectrum you don’t get response spikes which then become the problem, especially with the choir-mic scenario.”

Tuning is performed using both RHAON and in an Allen & Heath IDR8 DSP processor with an Allen & Heath T112 control surface, allowing it to be controlled from two different places.

A small delay system provides extra coverage into a small annexe at the rear and in the side halls, using CFX-61R cabinets, again controlled over RHAON and CobraNet. These are matched with six CF-121M cabinets for monitors, which can also be deployed as a portable PA in the larger side room of the church, or outside during the summer.

He continues, “It’s also very good for the monitoring because despite it being so loud up there it doesn’t feedback even when it’s rock’n'roll loud. Also,” he adds, “we work a lot with the grand piano and, for me, a grand piano has to sound good. If the grand piano doesn’t sound good then it’s nearly worse than having the drum kit not sounding right, but even when we’re pushing rock’n'roll levels and there’s a monitor there next to it, if you do push it to feedback it’s not high-end feedback but a just rumble, which tells you that the total room is just playing too loud. It’s very impressive and we’re extremely happy.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

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