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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN’S DUDERSTADT MULTIMEDIA CENTER NOW FLUSH WITH API ANALOG CONSOLES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN: The Duderstadt Center on the University of Michigan campus is a unique facility, not only because it is outfitted with three API consoles. In addition to housing libraries for the Art, Architecture, and Engineering programs and various computing facilities, the Duderstadt Center also houses the Digital Media Commons, which now includes three audio creation, recording, and production rooms designed by Walters-Storyk Design Group. Two of the rooms are recent additions and, in conjunction with the original Audio Studio’s 48-channel API Vision console, feature a 32-channel API Vision console and a 16-channel API 1608. As one might expect, the sophisticated, yet easy to navigate, rooms are used for art, music, and recording classes and provide students with first-hand experience in professional facilities. Importantly, any University of Michigan faculty member, staff member, or student can receive training on the use of the Duderstadt Center facilities and then use those facilities for any purpose whatsoever, school-related or not.

“The Duderstadt Center functions more like a lab than it does a classroom or a commercial studio,” explained David Greenspan, managing producer, University of Michigan. “We complement the audio facilities with video production resources, including computer animation workstations, a video capture studio, and editing suites. Users can take their video projects directly into the audio rooms. We were careful to design the whole facility in a way that would effectively flatten the learning curve. We would much rather have our users creating inspired art than worrying about which buttons to push. Because all three audio rooms use API consoles, users can [easily] move between them.”

The smallest of the three rooms is lovingly referred to as EMS A, short for Electronic Music Studio A. It is organized around the API 1608 console, which features slots for any 500-series modular processor. EMS A employs that flexibility to offer users three flavors of compression in dual-channel pairs: two API 525s, two API 527s, and two Pendulum Audio OCL-500s. Monitoring uses a 5.1 combination of Adam full-frequency loudspeakers and Genelec subwoofers. The larger EMS B is organized around the 32-channel API Vision console, which was custom built by API to deliver either 7.1 or 8.0 surround sound via Genelec 1037 loudspeakers and subs. Comprehensive networking between EMS A, EMS B, and the original Audio Studio’s 48-channel Vision allow sharing of resources – and even synchrony for large and involved productions.

When deciding what consoles to install in the new rooms, many factors came into play. “First, I wanted to protect the University of Michigan’s investment,” said Greenspan. “Signal flow is signal flow, whether you’re working with an analog console or a digital console. But digital protocols change, and I couldn’t promise the provost that a digital console we installed today would still be relevant twenty years from now. With an analog heart, we can be flexible and stay current with the evolving digital technologies that surround it.”

Given the Duderstadt Center’s positive experience with the original API Vision console, Greenspan was inclined to fill the new rooms with API consoles as well. “When they go out of warranty, it will be less expensive to maintain a single manufacturer than it would be to maintain multiple manufacturers,” he said. “But it also makes the training less onerous and the transition from room to room much easier. That sounded like the most inspiring approach to take.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

ASHLY NE800.70 AMPLIFIERS POWER RENOVATION AT BIG PALLET FUKUSHIMA CONVENTION CENTER

KORIYAMA, JAPAN: The Big Pallet Fukushima Convention Center regularly hosts meetings, exhibitions, festivals, and even sporting events, but the 250,000 square-foot facility suffered damage in Japan’s 2011 tsunami. Big Pallet recently reopened after extensive renovations, many of which were planned even before that devastating event unfolded. Revamped sound systems in the 31,000 square-foot exhibition hall and 1,000 square-foot convention hall were among them. Now completed, these systems use Ashly ne800.70 amplifiers to deliver clean, reliable power to One Systems loudspeakers.

Morimoto Naniwa Sound Projects Co., Ltd. of Tokyo designed the system, and local integration firm Esu Esu Techno Co., Ltd. installed it. “This project was to renew their old infrastructure,” said Masaki Morimoto, co-owner of Morimoto Naniwa Sound Projects. “Big Pallet was built in 1998, and all of its facilities – including sound reinforcement – were beginning to show their age. We drew up the renewal planning early in 2011, but the project was obviously postponed due to the huge tsunami in the spring of that year.” Morimoto said that the sound reinforcement systems in the exhibition and convention halls would primarily be used for announcement, “so high intelligibility and plenty of power were required.”

Existing inputs to the system include announcement microphones and background music sources, which feed an existing mixing console at the tech position. They were also able to repurpose some existing Panasonic DSPs for input and loudspeaker conditioning. New One Systems 112IM mains and 108IM/70 in-ceiling loudspeakers replaced the old loudspeakers, one for one. “It was easy to reuse the large Panasonic low-impedance amplifier for the 112IM loudspeakers,” said Morimoto. “But the options for a high-impedance power amplifier with large output were limited. Ashly Audio’s low cost, reliability, and sound quality made it the obvious choice.” Three Ashly ne800.70 amplifiers therefore power all of the 70-volt loudspeakers.

Morimoto tuned the system at commissioning, and Big Pallet’s staff operates the system day-to-day from the mixing console. “The sound quality of the new system is very good,” he concluded. “All announcements are clear and intelligible, even above the noise of an exhibition or event.”

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

ST. JOHN’S UNIVERSITY WELCOMES STUDENTS WITH SYMETRIX

NEW YORK, NEW YORK: St. John’s University in New York City is one of the world’s leading Catholic institutions of higher education and serves over 20,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Welcoming prospective students and introducing them to all that St. John’s has to offer is a tremendous undertaking. To put its best foot forward, the university recently updated its welcome center. Included in that update is new A/V presentation technology underpinned by a standalone Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 open-architecture DSP. Shadowbox Design Management of Hicksville, New York designed and installed the new system.

“The school wanted to invest in newer presentation technology to create a good impression for prospective students and for new students,” said Joseph Ondrek, vice president of Shadowbox Design Management. “Moreover, they wanted to make the presenters’ jobs easier.” Inputs to the system include a Denon Blu-ray/DVD player with RS-232 control, a satellite TV feed, a permanent lectern computer, an auxiliary laptop computer jack, two Sennheiser wireless microphones, and a permanent podium microphone. Two Sharp 80-inch LED monitors with independent output via a Kramer 4×4 HDMI matrix switcher complete the video portion of the system.

The audio inputs feed a Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 standalone open-architecture DSP, which features sixteen inputs, eight outputs, and flexible third-party control options. Shadowbox programmed the Solus 16 to use a gain-sharing auto-mixer for the three microphones, which provides a well-balanced output volume regardless of differences in voice volume or mic technique, as well as robust feedback protection. “The Solus 16 has plenty of inputs for this system, which includes a number of stereo input sources,” said Ondrek. “There’s still room for future expansion if the school chooses to add additional devices. Its open architecture software allowed us to tailor the functionality, and its comprehensive RS-232 controls allowed for easy integration with a third-party controller from RTI. Of course, Symetrix always delivers dependable processors, and that was an important consideration too.”

An RTI RK3V 3.5-inch color touchscreen controller permanently mounted to the presenter’s lectern allows independent source selection for video and audio, as well as individual volume and overall volume control. Users can also use an Apple iPad to wirelessly control the system from anywhere in the room. An RTI XP-6 central control processor is the cornerstone of the user control system. “The ability for the Solus 16 to respond to RS-232 commands was perfect for this installation,” said Ondrek. “Our experienced RTI programmer set up the system to create a user interface that allowed the university staff to get the most functionality in the quickest and simplest way. Any questions we had were addressed quickly by Ryan Curtright and the other Symetrix techs that we spoke with.”

A four-channel QSC CX-204V 70-volt amplifier powers twelve QSC AD-C152ST-WH shallow-mount, full-range ceiling speakers and four QSC AD-C81Tw flush-mount ceiling subwoofers. Both the full-range loudspeakers and the subwoofers are divided into true stereo to retain the full life and vitality of media-supplied audio. “This is a fairly large number of speakers in a relatively small space, and it allows the volume to be kept at a lower level by distributing the sound throughout the listening area,” said Ondrek. “As a result, adjacent office and meeting spaces remain quieter than they would if we had used fewer speakers with greater individual volume.” The Solus 16 DSP routes all microphones through the full-range loudspeakers only, whereas program audio is also routed through the subwoofers.

In addition to the main output, the SymNet Solus 16 also generates a separate audio mix as an auxiliary feed. That feed can be used to record a presentation or for overflow into an adjoining room. Although the microphone mute toggles and program audio source selection made via the in-room controllers are duplicated in the auxiliary audio mix, their levels may be independently controlled if so desired.

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

AUSTRALIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY VETERAN PHIL RIGGER CHOOSES METRIC HALO HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: Phil Rigger got his start in the music business the old fashioned way – in a rock band. That was the early 1980s, and the band was Outline. With Rigger on trumpet (boosted by a board loaded with pedals that launched his horn to the stratosphere) and acing the role of front man and lead vocalist, Outline tore up Australia, headlining packed shows and opening up for international acts that stopped down under. It was only a few years after the band split that Rigger formed Monstereo Music, a music and video production company that Rigger heads to this day. Now several decades into a financially successful and stable career, Rigger has written hit songs for other Aussie artists, produced and engineered innumerable albums, composed and produced for television and film, and, above all, continued to let his enthusiasm for the creative life keep him on a path that’s true. Along the way, he found Metric Halo and is now a dedicated user of Metric Halo’s hardware interfaces, its sound analysis program SpectraFoo, and its flagship plug-in ChannelStrip.

In addition to the intangible aspects of music production, Monstereo Music possesses a full-fledged recording studio and video production suite in Sydney. Like most people who get in the business and stay in the business, Rigger is opinionated about sound and the gear that improves (or sullies) it. The studio starts with a collection of tube mics from BeezNeez, Groove Tube, Neumann, and Rode, as well as solid-state microphones from those manufacturers and Shure, AKG, and Sennheiser. Outboard gear includes dual-channel Peach Audio tube preamps, Groove Tube SuPRE preamps, a Groove Tube MP-1 preamp, and a six-channel Audio Developments Class A mixer. The main Mac runs Cubase 7 and possesses 32GB RAM, 20TB of storage, and a Blackmagic video input card and 3GB output card. Event Electronics Opal studio monitors provide transduction at the other end. The video production suite possesses a cyclorama, three cameras, monitoring, and video switching. The video room and the control room are connected optically and via analogue so that users can monitor video input/output, as well as multichannel audio for webcasting and in-house shoots.

A collection of Metric Halo interfaces handles input and output conversion, as well as preamplification when Rigger is using a tube mic (he doesn’t necessarily like to go tube mic to tube pre for vocals). The collection includes one ULN-8, one 2882, and two ULN-2s, (one in the recording studio and one in the video production suite). “I got my first Metric Halo 2882 over a decade ago when my friend and frequent collaborator David Quinn discovered it,” said Rigger. “Because Metric Halo so faithfully supports its products with hardware and software upgrades, I’m still using that same 2882 today! What other piece of computer-related equipment evades obsolescence for so long? Between David and I we have three ULN8s, three 2882s and three ULN2s all with 2D cards.

He continued, “The reason I like Metric Halo interfaces is because they have that solid, high-quality sound. I’ve worked on a bunch of different high-end consoles over the years, and Metric Halo easily has the sound quality to compete with any of them. Of course, the portability is also fabulous. I’ve recorded so many live sets with my Metric Halo interfaces. They’re always solid and reliable.” Rigger also cites the on-board DSP as useful, especially the Character emulations that give the preamps different colors. “I’m a fan of the Classic British Pre emulation,” he said. “It adds a nice warmth to the recording that isn’t overbearing. In combination with a nice tube mic on vocals, the Metric Halo preamps produce a beautiful, rich recording.”

But Rigger’s use of Metric Halo gear doesn’t end there. In the studio, he keeps a second Mac up that runs SpectraFoo. It’s digitally connected to the main system for mixing and mastering. “SpectraFoo works beautifully,” Rigger said. “I’ve had it for nearly a decade. Other sound analysis programs have come along, but SpectraFoo’s display is par excellence. Having it up on a second computer works really well for me because the machine has nothing else to do but analyze the input. The great thing about that setup is that while I’m working, I can solo any individual track, any group, or even the entire song and analyze it.”

Finally, Rigger uses ChannelStrip as his go-to equalization and compression plug-in. “If I want to surgically adjust something, de-ess a vocal or brighten an acoustic track, ChannelStrip is fantastic,” he said. “It doesn’t put much of a load on the system, and although that isn’t such a huge concern these days, it’s a testament to good software design. I have a large collection of plug-ins, most of which I acquired for a particular sound or function, but ChannelStrip is more neutral and allows fine adjustment without imposing itself on the sound – a great feature! Metric Halo equipment and software are the foundation for my business.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY INSTALLS 64-CHANNEL API VISION CONSOLE FOR RECORDING ARTS ACADEMIC PROGRAM

WINTER PARK, FLORIDA: Full Sail University’s Studio B is now the official home of a 64-channel API Vision console. The console will be the centerpiece of the university’s Recording Arts Academic Program. After a rigorous process, Full Sail’s new Vision eventually became the console of choice, primarily due to its distinct analog sound and highly teachable signal path. Installed on January 2nd, Full Sail has completely integrated the console into its Academic Program and is more than pleased with this next level of professional gear offered to students.

“We are excited to have the API Vision Console installed into one of our on-campus studios,” said Darren Schneider, advanced session recording course director at Full Sail University. “This addition to campus provides another opportunity to work on a professional platform and prepares them with knowledge of the technology they will encounter when pursuing careers in the music industry.”

Founded more than thirty years ago, Full Sail University, according to Rolling Stone Magazine, offers one of the top five best music programs in the country and is home to over 18,000 students from all over the world. “We’re honored to have an API console at such a prestigious educational facility,” API President Larry Droppa commented. “Students enrolled in the Recording Arts program learn all aspects of console technique and we’re convinced API products are an excellent way to both teach and understand signal path and signal flow.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS DANTE NETWORK AUDIO DSP BRINGS ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER INTO THE 21ST CENTURY

ATLANTA, GEORGIA: The Atlanta History Center (AHC), which was founded in 1926, is in a period of tremendous growth. Its mission to link people, history, and culture through innovative programming connects with 228,000 visitors, including 60,000 school children, every year. In order to accommodate an expanding membership, increasing visitor base and a broadening range of programs, AHC increasingly relied on the 400-seat Woodruff Auditorium that was constructed in 1975. Although minor upgrades to the audio/visual system had taken place over the years, the facility was still using some of the original 1970s vintage equipment – components that were themselves becoming historical artifacts.

“In today’s constantly evolving world of technology, we must be able to connect our visitors with history through a variety of methods, not just traditional exhibitions and displays,” said Hillary Hardwick, vice president of marketing communications with AHC. “We must adapt our methods to meet the current and future needs of our diverse and growing audience, and having the right technology plays a significant role in how we deliver innovative programming.”

AHC consulted with Rogers Dixson, president and owner of Atlanta’s Cape Dixson Associates Incorporated (CDAI). In addition to having worked on a number of exhibits and new facilities over the years, CDAI had consulted on a significant renovation to the Woodruff Auditorium’s acoustics a number of years before.

CDAI first reviewed AHC’s system requirements with Jackson McQuigg, AHC’s vice president of properties. These requirements include AHC’s historical theatre program as well as a wide range of lectures, presentations, and other types of events being held in the Auditorium. CDAI and AHC concluded that to accommodate AHCs new and expanding requirements, a comprehensive replacement of the existing audio/visual and stage lighting systems was needed. The Atlanta History Center was able to undertake this project thanks to a grant from The Goizueta Foundation, but the use of grant funds meant that the project team had to make every dollar count.

CDAI realized that, while modern technologies existed that would meet AHC’s needs, the budget posed several challenges to the project team. CDAI proposed that AHC consider a different approach for the project. CDAI brought in Sound Design & Innovation (SDI), a new audio/visual system integration company started by Aaron Catlin, a former CDAI employee. “It was interesting the way the project evolved into a collaboration between CDAI, SDI and AHC,” explained Dixson. “I think the critical component that made this approach work was the high degree of mutual trust and respect between all three parties.”

A number of outstanding products were considered for the project but all of the original options posed challenges for the tight budget. Ultimately, the team decided on Symetrix’ Radius 12×8 Dante network audio DSP as the best “fit” for the project. The key element of the Symetrix system is Dante audio networking protocol, for which SDI wired the facility with CAT6 cabling.

“The Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 DSP is the cornerstone of the system; without it, a system with these capabilities would not have been possible within the budget constraints. When Symetrix announced the release of the Radius 12×8 DSP it was like the heavens opened up and smiled on us,” said Catlin.

The Symetrix Radius 12×8 has a powerful open-architecture DSP. It is fully and reliably controllable from a third-party application and its I/O is flexible and expandable for the future via the Dante network. In this installation it’s handling all of the processing for the main auditorium and the two overflow rooms, including room combining, but we’re only using about twenty percent of its DSP horsepower. Because the whole place is now wired with CAT6, AHC can easily expand or bring in additional Dante-compatible equipment for larger events.”

Bose digital amplifiers power a pair of discrete three element Bose column arrays and subwoofers that, in combination with the CDAI-designed acoustical environment, provide an amazing sound quality improvement in the space. “We set up a demonstration of the Bose system for AHC and the decision to use it was made on the spot,” says Dixson.

Six new Shure ULX-D series wireless microphones provide the workhorse, day-in-day-out inputs to the system. “Because AHC is in the Buckhead area of Atlanta – an area that can be an RF interference nightmare – I was glad to have Shure’s new Dante-based system to provide a reliable front end,” said Catlin. Outputs from video players, microphones from two overflow event rooms, and a stage box comprise the remaining inputs to the system. Since they interface seamlessly into a Dante network, the Shure system is fully available for processing and matrixing within the Symetrix Radius 12×8 DSP and doesn’t use any of its twelve physical inputs.

A Key Digital® Compass Control® system provides iPad and iPod-based touch control of every aspect of the room’s functionality. It controls a new Digital Projection E-Vision 8000 lumen Video Projector, new DMX controlled stage lighting, the existing stage curtains, the projection screen, and a variety of music and video playback devices. It also integrates with the Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 DSP to control room combining, input selection, volume, and other relevant system controls.

“With this new technology, we can deliver high-quality programs that will engage a broader audience. It allows us to explore the ways in which we convey history – whether through lectures, music series, film series, our newly-launched museum theater performances, and a variety of other types of event,” said Hardwick. “This system was not only conceived and designed to meet AHC’s needs for a long time to come, it brings AHC into the 21st Century, where a cutting-edge history center belongs,” Catlin concluded.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix engineers high-end professional audio solutions, specializing in DSP hardware and software. Symetrix products are distributed worldwide, and designed and manufactured in the U.S. at the Seattle area headquarters. Since 1976, customers have enjoyed the benefits of Symetrix’ independent ownership and management.  For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

HANOI INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP INSTALLS FIRST DANLEY SOUND LABS SYSTEM IN VIETNAM’S CAPITAL

HANOI, VIETNAM: The Hanoi International Fellowship (HIF) is a non-denominational church serving both expatriates and nationals in Hanoi, Vietnam. It draws together a congregation of over four hundred people, representing over forty nationalities. Because many of its members are itinerant or transient diplomats, students, and employees of NGOs, international businesses, and the like, HIF’s congregation turns over more rapidly than the congregations of most churches. HIF recently moved to its first permanent building, and its challenging acoustics demanded exceptional pattern control from its new sound reinforcement system. Singapore-based Soundsmith Solutions Pte. Ltd. designed the new system using Danley Sound Labs SM-80 and SH-micro loudspeakers and TH-mini subwoofers.

The new sanctuary seats just over two hundred people, and HIF’s services are punctuated by a full band playing contemporary music. “Previously, the congregation met at a local 5-star hotel, and the hotel provided them with the usual hotel sound system,” said Pastor Jinggoy of Hanoi International Fellowship. “That system was uneven. It was too loud toward the front and inconsistent throughout the rest of the room. The subs were boomy and the high-end was harsh.” In addition to designing the system, Soundsmith Solutions also supplied the components. Pastor Jinggoy helped coordinate the church’s own contractors to install the system based on Soundsmith Solution’s drawings and specifications.

Edwin Ng, project manager at Soundsmith Solutions Pte. Ltd., commented, “The big challenge in the new space was its very low ceilings. Moreover, it used to be a warehouse, so none of the walls were designed with acoustics in mind. The challenge was compounded by the fact that there were few places to position loudspeakers that wouldn’t interfere with sight lines. The Danley Sound Labs boxes were a very fitting solution due to their low profiles and their exceptional directivity.” The goal was to keep energy on the congregants and off the walls.

Inputs to the system collect at an Allen & Heath GL2400-424 console, which outputs to a Xilica XP8080 digital loudspeaker management processor. In turn, the processor outputs to QSC RMX 4050HD and RMX 5050 amplifiers. Those power two Danley SM-80 loudspeakers that provide main coverage, six Danley SH-micro loudspeakers that serve as delays, and one more Danley SH-micro that fills in the center front. “The SM-80s were ideal loudspeakers for the mains because they are so slim and could be mounted into the wall without any trouble,” said Ng. “Both the SM-80 and the SH-micro are highly directional, which was great for these low ceilings. The sound goes where it is supposed to go and nowhere else! Importantly, that directivity extends down to 400Hz. Moreover, the Danley tone is natural and not at all fatiguing.”

To provide low-end support for the system, Ng included two Danley TH-mini subwoofers, which the installers mounted into the front wall below the SM-80s. “The TH-mini has to be the smallest but loudest sub I’ve ever heard,” he said. “The amount of bass coming out of this box when properly powered is nothing short of amazing. Subjectively, every bass note is tight and punchy.”

He continued, “All together, the new system is way, way better than the system they used at the hotel. Everything sounds clear, crisp, and pleasant to the ears, and it doesn’t matter where you sit. The whole room is evenly covered. Even when the microphones are placed right underneath the center fill Danley SH-micro, there is no feedback. Hanoi International Fellowship couldn’t be happier.”

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology. www.danleysoundlabs.com

1608 IN KOREA – API NAMES MI CORP A 1608 DISTRIBUTOR

SEOUL, KOREA: When MI Corp signed on as a distributor earlier this year, it was clear that they would make a great API representative in Korea. Now, taking the next step, MI Corp has become Korea’s representative, making the coveted console available to an entire market that was previously untapped.

MI Corp experienced much initial success with API products such as the Lunchbox®, 500 Series modules and the 3124+. As they began to design recording studios, it was clear that one thing was missing: the API 1608 console.

“MI Corp is designing prominent recording studios and meeting the most difficult demands of sound engineers,” said Sunny Park, Manager of the Import Department. “Many engineers [in Korea] would like to own and operate an API 1608 console.” And thus, the authorization to sell the 1608 console began. The 1608 that was shipped just a few weeks ago features its own demo room at the MI Corp headquarters.

Situated in the Gangnam-Gu area of Seoul, MI Corp originated as a musical instrument distributor back in 1997. As of 2009, they began to expand their services, aiming to become a leader in the multi-media industry. Expanding to professional audio and video, as well as the architecture and design of studios, they have been known as MI Corp ever since. Sales director and former recording engineer, Ted Suh, was familiar with the API reputation and knew the impact it would have in Korea and API soon became a fundamental part of their inventory.

“In the current digital audio equipment market, customers missed analog music equipment. We think API is the leading company, not only for consoles, but analog modules,” said Park.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

RASCAL FLATTS FOH ENGINEER JONATHAN LOESER RELIES ON METRIC HALO SPECTRAFOO SOUND ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA: In only a dozen years, Jonathan Loeser has risen from newly-minted SAE Institute graduate to FOH engineer for multi-platinum country act Rascal Flatts. Along the way, he has worked as FOH engineer & production manager for Olivia Newton-John, FOH & monitor engineer for Prince’s “Welcome 2 America” tour, and FOH Engineer for Colbie Caillat’s 2011 Tour. The amiable engineer secured those gigs by delivering consistently excellent results, largely free of hiccups or hassles, through careful planning. One of his go-to tricks is careful metering and sound analysis. On the recommendation of colleagues, he recently upgraded to Metric Halo’s sound analysis software, SpectraFoo, which is paired with his Metric Halo LIO-8 interface, itself recently upgraded to include preamps.

“I originally purchased the LIO-8 to give myself a serious, professional interface that would be flexible enough to do anything I needed it to do,” said Loeser. “Prior to that, my converter was cheap. It felt like it was going to break in my hand. The LIO-8, together with its companion MIO Console software, gives me all of the routing and flexibility I need.” Although he had previously used a wireless DBX measurement microphone with line-level output, for the new Rascal Flatts tour, Loeser wanted to expand his monitoring options. “I added the mic preamp option for the LIO-8, which now gives me even more flexibility and portability.”

Previously, Loeser had used sound analysis software primarily for its transfer function. “With SpectraFoo, I’m still able to do that, of course, but I’m also able to do so much more,” he said. “SpectraFoo is very flexible. For example, when I do a time capture, I can move the point that I want to correlate with, which makes it a much more useful tool. Once I learned how to compose and save snapshot window sets, I configured SpectraFoo to show me everything I want to see for tuning and, separately, for the actual show.” Part of that functionality includes making up for his Studer Vista 5’s seeming only weakness: metering.

Tuning the system requires dealing with Rascal Flatts’ somewhat unconventional stage setup. “We have an extensive thrust, and there’s an apron in front of the stage that makes it hard to fill the gaps that it creates,” Loeser explained. “I have some under-hangs that do the trick, but they are touchy. For this tour, I’ve added two Audix measurement mics. During system tuning, I’m able to place them in the questionable zone of seating. Then, using SpectraFoo, I can actually see what the down-fills are doing. That’s critical because squeezing good vocal volume out when the main vocal mic is in front of the PA is my biggest potential headache.”

During tuning, Loeser’s custom SpectraFoo screen includes full-frequency transfer functions on the wireless RTA mic, as well as on the thrust mics. He also includes high-resolution, low-frequency transfer functions to properly align the subwoofers. For the show itself, Loeser flips to another custom SpectraFoo screen. He moves the Audix microphones to a near-audience position on stage that is also used by the monitor engineer for crowd capture. In addition to watching the transfer functions for those microphones, Loeser also takes a feed from the Vista 5 that parallels his send to the PA and gives it a big, fat meter in SpectraFoo.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

Yamaha StageMix 4.0 Now Available

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. announces the availability of StageMix 4.0 for Yamaha CL, M7CL, and LS9 digital consoles. Updates available include new Dynamics Parameter Editing, Output Port Delay Editing, Output Port Levels (Gain/Attenuation), PEQ Copy and Paste, Phantom Power Switching, Mix Send Pre/Post Switching, HPF Slope Parameter (CL V1.5 only), Retina Display Support, and other enhancements.

“StageMix Version 4 raises the bar for digital mixer iPad control,” states Kevin Kimmel, Systems Application Engineer, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. “We’ve continuously set the standard since we released the first version in 2010.”

The StageMix App provides greater control and flexibility for both digital mixing consoles and enables the mixing engineer to freely adjust console parameters and sound levels by wireless control, rather than at the mix position. The App also provides features like Mute Group Masters; Channel Naming; Channel Pan; Send Levels in Meter Bridge; Tap Tempo; Selectable Input and Output Meter Positions; and DCA Faders (CL and M7CL only).

Yamaha StageMix Version 4 is available from the Apple iTunes Store as a free upgrade. For more information on StageMix Version 4, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

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