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MONTREAL’S ANALOG RECORDING SCENE DEFINED BY STUDIO 270’S API LEGACY PLUS

MONTRÉAL, CANADA – MARCH 2013: Studio 270 has proven that the purest sound cannot be digitized with their 48-channel API Legacy Plus with API Vision automation. Nearly two years ago, François Hamel and Robert Langois decided to reconnect with recording’s analog roots by purchasing the Legacy Plus for their Montréal-based studio. They were the first to acquire an API Legacy Plus with API Vision automation, an investment that Hamel claims was the best they have ever made.

When Studio 270 set up shop in 1987, the digital tsunami had yet to make landfall. Now, twenty-six years later, it is thriving in a world where most of its clients regard inexpensive and omnipresent digital technology as an extension of their organic being. It is for precisely that reason that the studio decided to distinguish itself by committing to time-tested, analog technology. That decision has paid off in dividends as area musicians discover that the API sound far exceeds the limited capabilities of their digital gadgetry.

“We predicted that ‘mid-level’ recording studios would have a hard time surviving as more and more inexpensive digital technology became available, and we were right.” Hamel said of Studio 270. “But in addition, young musicians have no basis for understanding the difference between a $125 interface and a $125,000 digital console. To them, digital is digital, and if they can buy a digital product that promises them the moon for $600, then in their eyes, why should they book a digital studio for $600 a day?”

Hamel likened his younger clientele’s experience to that of fine dining. “The API Legacy Plus is like a five-star restaurant,” he said. “An inexpensive digital rig is like a microwave. You have a microwave at home, and you eat at home most of the time. But on special occasions, it’s good to get out and go to a five-star restaurant, where maybe you don’t exactly understand how the cook pulls it off, but the difference is obvious.”

“They’ve never seen moving faders before,” he said of the younger clientele. “It’s a revelation to them that they can – and should – mix with their eyes closed. They’re used to staring at screens. Apart from its immense functionality and stability (the software never crashes), API automation is worth it strictly from a marketing perspective.”

When his clients hear the API Legacy Plus, they’re often taken aback. Since Studio 270 installed it, many bands have booked a few days without making future plans to return. They have a remarkable experience, and then they’re back a few months later. “They want to relive the experience!” said Hamel. “It’s API’s headroom and separation. When you mix on an iPad or whatever, everything is smashed in. Once they hear the openness and liveliness of the Legacy Plus, they’re hooked. They’ll work jobs on the weekends to get back in here.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

Morris Light & Sound Takes Delivery of First NEXO STM System in North America

BUENA PARK, Calif.—An early adopter of NEXO loudspeaker systems, Nashville-based Morris Light & Sound is the first in North America to take delivery of the new, flagship NEXO STM loudspeaker system, it was announced today by the Company and Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS).

The 200+-box STM system includes 68 STM M46, 80 STM B112 bass, 48 STM S118 subs, 22 NUAR Racks, 12 PS10R2 speakers, 18 RS18 Ray Subs, and 16 GEO S12 loudspeakers. Two Yamaha DME64N Digital Mix Engines have also been purchased to run 16 channels of Lake Mesa EQ for zone control when required. The company also owns 24 NEXO 45-N12 line monitors.

Morris Light and Sound is a full service production and integration company with more than 25 years experience in the entertainment industry providing professional audio, video, and lighting services for live events, tours and the fixed installation marketplace throughout North America.

We are extremely pleased to be collaborating with Morris Light & Sound on the new STM system and excited to introduce them as our first NEXO STM associate in North America,” states Paul Furtkamp, National Sales Manager, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. “Involved with STM since its early stages, Morris L & S has provided very valuable input to NEXO on its development. Both NEXO and YCAS are very proud to be aligned with a company like Morris Light & Sound that truly define what it means to be on the cutting edge of a new technology like NEXO STM. We look forward to a very long and productive relationship between our two companies.”

The NEXO STM Series (Scale Through Modularity) loudspeaker cabinets are the first of its kind on the market. Ideal for touring, festivals, and sound company rental, the new system combines the best of Alpha functionality with the technical innovation of NEXO’s patented Hyperbolic Reflector and venting design in which all radiating surfaces are in phase, delivering a powerful, flexible, and easy to use system. STM enables line array systems to scale up or down depending on event audience size, from 1,000 to 100,000 people.

The STM system can be configured from three discrete loudspeaker elements: M46 main, B112 bass, S118 sub-bass modules with plans to release addition STM components in the near future. System configurations can comprise arrays of main cabinets only, main plus bass, or bass plus main plus bass. STM is unique in that it is the first vertical array system to offer scalable LF, making it easy to add extra bass cabinets for increased power and headroom, without introducing unwanted phase anomalies makes STM unique, as it is the first vertical array system to offer scalable LF. Deploying the dedicated subbass cabinets, either in the arrays or as ground-stacks, further increases the system’s options. The ‘Omni’ fill speakers complete the coverage pattern, whatever the scale of the system. STM also features a very innovative “one-man” rigging system that allows quick and safe construction of STM configurations. PistonRigTM allows pre-setting of inter-cabinet angle values. REDLockTM handle locks front rigging points from rear of cabinet. All adjustments made from one position at rear of cluster.

“From our first trip to NEXO headquarters over a year ago, we immediately embraced the concept of STM,” states David Haskell, President, Morris Light & Sound. “The ability to scale the system for audiences from 1,000 to 100,000 got our attention. And, after working closely with the NEXO team, I can proudly say they have delivered the most flexible and best sounding system I have heard in many years. We are proud to be a developmental partner with NEXO and YCAS in bringing this wonderful new product to the market and look forward to a lasting relationship.”

For more information on Morris Light & Sound, visit www.morrislightandsound.com.

For more information on the NEXO STM system, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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PHOTO ID: L to R: Morris L&S V.P, John Mills; Paul Furtkamp, YCAS National Sales Manager; David Haskell, President, Morris L&S

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Yamaha CL Firmware Upgrade Now Available

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. has announced the availability of Version 1.51 firmware upgrade for the CL Digital Console Series.

New features include Scene Preview functionality; the Help function is further supported by an on-screen reference guide, which once loaded, resides in the console permanently. The recently launched Ri8-D, Ro8-D, and NXAmp with NXDT104 have been added as Dante devices that can be detected/patched into the CL Series. A CUE LEVEL knob has been added to the CUE section, allowing adjustment of the CUE level and can be assigned to a custom fader or user defined knob. The HPF in the Parametric EQ section has been improved with an option for a slope of -12dB/oct or -6dB/oct.

Yamaha CL Version 1.51 also includes improvements to the DANTE SETUP screen, and a NEW I/O DEVICE screen, separate from the VIRTUAL RACK screen has been added, allowing for more flexible control and management of each I/O device.

“Our company continually strives to make significant improvements and additions of key features and benefits to systems’ firmware that will be beneficial to our customers,” states Kevin Kimmel, Systems Application Engineer, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. “Version 1.51 for the CL Series is proof that we don’t just put a new product out, we continue to improve on that product based on input from our end users.”

Yamaha CL Version 1.51 firmware upgrade is available now, free of charge via download at www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Jünger Audio Helps TVN in Chile Comply With International Loudness Legislation

In today’s broadcast world where content is monetized through international sales and television signals often cross geographic boundaries, controlling audio levels is just as important for TV broadcasters in countries with no Loudness legislation as it is for those in countries that do.

TVN in Chile is just such a broadcaster. Although Chile has no Loudness legislation, TVN has an international channel – TV Chile – that is broadcast around the world via satellite and therefore needs to comply with the regulations in place in various countries including the USA.

Mauricio Rojo, TVN’s Deputy Manager of Engineering, was charged with the task of finding a loudness control solution that would meet this challenge and, after carrying out tests with several manufacturer’s products, he chose T*AP Television Audio Processors from German Loudness Control specialist Jünger Audio.

“We already had a loudness processor from another manufacture but we wanted something that was more flexible in the final audio chain and has a sophisticated algorithm that could deliver very high quality audio,” Rojo explains. “The Jünger Audio T*AP processor won the test hands down because it was so simple to use and, thanks to Junger Audio’s LEVEL MAGIC™ II algorithm, was able to deliver the audio quality we were looking for.

Rojo adds that price was also a consideration.

“There are entry level products available from other manufacturers that are cheaper but they didn’t offer the same audio quality,” he says. “Considering their performance, the T*AP units were very cost-effective and we had no hesitation in ordering two of them.”

Founded in 1969 as a public channel, TVN is Chile’s main broadcaster with a reach that extends to 98% of the country. With its main facilities in Santiago, TVN also broadcasts a news channel, 24 Horas, and an international channel, TV Chile, which is received via satellite around the world.

“Our international channel is available in Europe, all the Americas and Oceania so it was important that our broadcasts complied with the legislation in place in those territories,” Rojo says. “T*AP’s compliance with all international standards and regulations (ITU 1770/1/2/3, ATSC A85 or EBU R128) was a key point in our final decision making.”

TVN has now installed one T*AP processor on TV Chile’s transmission chain and it will be installing its second T*AP on TVN’s main transmission chain very soon. Both units were supplied by Jünger Audio’s distributor in Chile, Intervideo Ingeniería y Telecomunicaciones Ltda.

“We are very happy with the way the first T*AP processor is performing, particularly with the quality of the audio,” Rojo adds. “Our sound engineers are very satisfied because their final mixes are controlled without compromising the aesthetic of the sound.”

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About Jünger Audio
Established in Berlin in 1990, Jünger Audio specialises in the design and manufacture of high-quality digital audio dynamics processors. It has developed a unique range of digital processors that are designed to meet the demands of the professional audio market. All of its products are easy to operate and are developed and manufactured in-house, ensuring that the highest standards are maintained throughout. Its customers include many of the world’s top radio and TV broadcasters, IPTV providers, music recording studios and audio post production facilities. www.junger-audio.com

The British Library Invests In Prism Sound ADA-8XR Converters to Digitise Its Multitrack Collection

Prism Sound ADA-8XR multichannel audio converters are being used to help the British Library digitise its collection of multitrack audio tapes in order to ensure the future of these valuable and historic recordings.

To tackle this project the British Library has acquired two more ADA-8XR converters, bringing the total number of units in its sound facilities to seven. It has also acquired a Prism Sound Orpheus interface.

Nigel Bewley, the British Library’s Operations Manager Sound & Vision, says: “We have a relatively small collection of 200 multitrack tapes and we think it will take about 20 weeks to complete this project, including the preparation of the resultant files, metadata compilation etc. We will also be using a third Prism Sound ADA-8XR converter, which we already own, to digitise 24 track tapes and to ingest all tracks simultaneously.”

Bewley adds that it is much more cost effective for the British Library to undertake this project in-house, rather than to out-house it. Also, by carrying out the work in-house, the British Library’s curators and content specialists can readily advise on the project.

“We use multiple ingest techniques with other analogue carriers such as tape and cassette,” Bewley explains. “The Prism Sound ADA-8XR units allow us to input 4 stereo channels or 8 mono channels (or any permutation) simultaneously. We use Prism Sound ADA-8XR converters because of their high audio quality. Furthermore they are 8 channel so support our multiple ingest workflows. Another important reason is that the Prism Sound ADA-8XR supports a wide range of sample rates including 32kHz. Once this project is completed, the new units will be used on other projects throughout our sound facilities.”

Multitrack tapes are notorious for their ability to degrade over time. In cases where the oxide is shedding they have to be ‘baked’ to return them to a stable condition so that they can be transferred onto a more secure medium.

“We do bake tapes when required and some of the multitrack tapes we are currently dealing with may need baking,” Bewley says. “The multitrack project is a preservation project – we want to preserve the individual tracks. Researchers may want to listen to just one track to hear a bass guitar part, for example, isolated from the mix. Many of the multitracks will have been mixed and made available as published CDs, LPs etc, but some have not, in which case we will need to work out how we are going to do a mixdown (if at all) for access purposes.”

The Sound Archive at the British Library is a resource with enormous national and historical importance. Its history can be traced back to 1905, when it was first suggested that the British Museum should have a collection of audio recordings of poets and statesmen. The Gramophone Company started donating metal masters of audio recordings, among them recordings by Nellie Melba, Adelina Patti, Caruso, Lev Tolstoy, Ernest Shackleton and Herbert Beerbohm Tree.
However, the British Museum was not maintaining a comprehensive archive and this worried Patrick Saul who, in 1955, started the British Institute of Recorded Sound. A public appeal was launched and thousands of shellac discs were donated, which started off the collection.

In 1983, the British Institute of Recorded Sound became part of the British Library, which had split off from the British Museum. Later renamed the British Library Sound Archive, it eventually acquired the metal masters originally collected by the British Museum when these were transferred to the Archive in 1992.
Situated near London’s Kings Cross, The British Library has 10 transfer studios and one recording studio, which is designed for speech recording. The audio suites are named after pioneers in audio technology and techniques from across the years and include Emile Berliner (1851-1929), Alan Blumlein (1903-1942), Thomas Edison (1847-1931), Fred Gaisberg (1873-1951), Michael Gerzon (1945-1996), George Gouraud (1841-1912), Arthur Haddy (1906-1989), Martin Hannett (1948-1991), Jean Jenkins (1922-1990), Joe Meek (1929-1967) and Alec Reeves (1902-1971).

All of the transfer studios are equipped with Digital Audio Workstations running SADiE or Wavelab and most also have Prism Sound ADA-8XR converters. The majority of these transfer suites are used for archival transfers but the rooms are also designed for more complicated transfer work, combined with restoration and editing, which is carried out by specialist audio engineers. The facilities have been used to train archivists from other organisations in audio archiving methodology and techniques.

“The larger studios have analogue kit to deal with a variety of formats,” Bewley explains. “We also have an Artefact Collection representing the history of recorded sound. We often ‘raid’ this collection to deal with obscure formats such as short-lived dictation formats, wire recordings, dictabelts and others. We also have a custom made cylinder player and we can deal with a wide range of legacy analogue formats, but we do have a wide range of digital kit, too.”

The British Library’s recording studio is used for podcasts, oral history interviews and audiobook recording for the British Library’s CD publication programme. Alongside its fixed facilities, the British Library has a busy location recording programme that takes in theatres, poetry and literary events, soundscape recording, wildlife, sound effect recording, oral history interviews in the interviewee’s home, workshops and seminars, music concerts and performances.

With such a wealth of recorded material in the archive, Nigel Bewley says real gems can be discovered when material is being transferred from one format to another.

“We recently discovered a collection of recordings made by the Swiss psychotherapist and psychiatrist Carl Jung that were made on wire during the 1960s,” he says. “Obviously it is very exciting when we unearth recordings like that – and it’s surprising how often it happens.”

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About Prism Sound
Founded in 1987, Prism Sound manufacture high-quality professional digital audio equipment for the International broadcast, film, music production, manufacturing and telecommunications sectors. The company’s product range includes the Prism ADA-8XR precision 8-channel converter unit, which is regularly used for music and film soundtrack projects by clients such as EMI Abbey Road, BBC, Sony, Lucasfilm and Walt Disney. Prism Sound also manufactures a range of audio test and measurement products, including the de facto standard DSA-1 handheld digital audio generator/analyser and the dScope Series III audio analyser system.

For more information: www.prismsound.com

NEW YORK’S ALTO NYC BELIEVES IN THE METRIC HALO PRODUCT AND SERVICE PHILOSOPHY

NEW YORK, NEW YORK: Alto NYC is Alto Music’s New York-based professional audio retailer that truly nurtures a reciprocal relationship with the studio owners, musicians, composers, producers, and engineers who list among its clients. Its Manhattan showroom would be better described as a fully-functioning control room, complete with structural isolation, acoustic treatment, and almost every piece of gear imaginable – all just a patch away from a test drive or shootout in a real working environment. Alto NYC treats its clients to a one-on-one experience, with working professionals serving as audio gurus to help guide clients to their ideal, situation-specific solutions. The company sells a wide range of audio converters, and the Metric Halo ULN-8, LIO-8, 2882, and ULN-2 converters have found favor among clients looking for high-end sound and tremendous flexibility.

“The starting point is always obtaining a clear understanding of what exactly a client hopes to achieve,” said Shane Koss, Alto NYC’s audio guru. “Are they building a home studio? A public studio? What are the inputs? The outputs? And of course, what is the budget? I find that a lot of people come in because they have read about this or that magic solution in an online forum or review, and they think that getting it will solve some large issue problem they’re having. Sometimes that’s true and sometimes it’s not. Although it’s probably counterproductive to my bottom line, I often recommend against particular purchases because I honestly don’t believe the gear they’ve set their sights on will address the issue.”

Koss keeps one foot in the retail business and the other foot in the activities that led him to the retail business in the first place: writing music for TV and movies, working with bands, and producing/engineering projects. “Along with my schooling, that real-world working experience has been, and continues to be, invaluable for the work I do at Alto,” he said. “I wouldn’t be able to do what I do if I didn’t actually use the stuff. Background is critical.” Koss recognizes that many aspects of professional audio are irreducibly subjective, but that there is also a large degree of objectivity in the way professional audio equipment is made and priced. “Unless you’re a total cynic and believe that a $4,000 piece of gear is designed and manufactured in the same way that a $500 piece of gear is designed and manufactured, then there is some objective difference between them,” he said. “So the question becomes, ‘what is that difference and is it worth the money?’”

He continued, “Metric Halo converters excel in situations where audio transparency and configuration flexibility are paramount. I have clients come in who need a converter that can do A, B, and C all of the time, D and E when they’re on the road, and F on Tuesdays! Once they learn Metric Halo’s MIO Console, that kind of extreme flexibility is not only possible, it’s easy to implement.” Alto Music sells all of Metric Halo’s interfaces, from the flagship ULN-8, with eight channels of latest-generation preamps and converters, to the original 2882 (updated to accommodate current operating systems and communications protocols, of course).

“The fun part of my job is working with clients to meet their needs,” Koss said. “The unpleasant part is working out the behind-the-scenes details – finding out, for example, why this or that didn’t ship, when such and such will be in stock – that kind of thing. Fortunately, I never get that with Metric Halo. Although they’ve moved to Florida, they still have that New York attitude that I appreciate. It’s no BS – get it done right and get it done fast. Metric Halo is one of those companies that makes a solid product that I believe in – and that’s easy to work with.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

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BROOKLYN-BASED KEMADO RECORDS INSTALLS 32-CHANNEL API 1608

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK: Kemado Records is the latest studio to install a 32-Channel version of API’s popular 1608 console. Kemado, long known for bringing national attention to innovative artists spanning the spectrum from indie rock to heavy metal, choose the 1608 to complement its recent plans for expansion, which included the creation of two new labels (Mexican Summer and Software), a brick-and-mortar record store, and a recording studio in 2009.

Kemado’s founders Andrés Santo Domingo and Tom Clapp are happy to report that the recording studio has seen near continual use and offers clients over 1,000 square-feet of tracking space. Kemado’s new 1608 is housed in the larger of two separate control rooms.

Deciding what would replace the existing console became increasingly clear as the choices were analyzed and rejected, explained Clapp. “We figured that if we were going to replace a classic vintage console, we had to replace it with something in the same respected sonic family. But at the same time, we wanted to avoid the near-constant servicing required of some older consoles. So we decided we wanted something new but still classic, which made the 1608 the perfect fit; it’s a classic console with a classic sound. Plus it’s designed to be in constant use, and the modular design ensures that it can be serviced when that time comes. The other options we looked at were not in the same sonic league with the 1608, nor were they built for the long haul.”

Clapp and colleagues burned the midnight oil and installed the new console in just three days, and synched the 1608 into a fully-decked Pro Tools HD rig with 48in/48out, a Studer 827A tape machine, and a Studer A80 VU mix-down deck. And with so many engineers coming through the door, part of the 1608’s allure was its straightforward topology and signal flow, as was its gain structure. “The 1608 definitely has a modern gain structure, in contrast to many of the choices we reviewed,” said Clapp. Choosing that classic API sound was, in Clapp’s words, a “no-brainer”.

“I’ve worked with API gear before, and I love the fast transients and headroom,” he said. “We even tried 500-series modules from a range of high-end manufacturers to fill out the 1608’s API 500-Series slots, but we kept coming back to the API sound.” To date, eighteen of the available 32 slots have been filled with API 550b 4-band and API 560 graphic EQs. “We’re going to slowly fill the rest of the slots with API EQs down the road,” Clapp promises.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

ASHLY PROCESSORS AND AMPS EARN AN ENCORE

COLUMBUS, OHIO: Encore is a new, high-spirited nightclub located in the Crosswoods neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio. Its strategy for success is to show patrons such a fantastic time that they quickly return to enjoy an encore. Tasteful bar food, a wide range of drinks, and elegant décor and lighting provide the perfect frame for Encore’s daily upscale party. But the heart of the party resides in an articulate, high-SPL, bass-rich sound system designed and installed by local A/V integrator Demmer Audio Video Solutions. Two Ashly 3.6SP Protea digital speaker processors and six Ashly KLR Series amplifiers drive the sound system – and thus Encore’s enthusiastic patrons – nightly.

The new club occupies approximately 2,500 square-feet on a single floor, with a large main room and dance floor complemented by a handful of smaller rooms that are available for private functions. “The owners were looking for a very reliable sound system with solid fidelity and bass,” said Ken Demmer, owner of Demmer Audio Video Solutions. “Moreover, they wanted to be able to come in, turn it on, and know that it would work as expected. They didn’t want to worry about adjusting this or that, and they wanted the minimal access necessary to simply plug in a DJ, select a source, and adjust the volume. That’s it.”

Inputs to the system include a DISH Satellite interface, a cable interface, an iPod dock, a computer media player, and, of course, a DJ input. Because the owners requested it based on their familiarity with systems at their other establishments, Demmer installed a DBX ZonePRO processor for input selection and volume control. However, the meat of the processing at Encore resides within two Ashly 3.6SP Protea digital speaker processors.

“The Ashly Protea processors have excellent sonic quality,” Demmer said. “They’re very clean, the equalization is smooth, and the conversion is nice. The programming software is easy to use, and I can save the configuration program on my laptop, load it via a straightforward USB connection, and lock out the front panel of the unit so that no one fiddles with the settings. That’s a big selling point for my clients – it protects their investment.”

Six Ashly KLR-2000, two Ashly KLR-4000, and three Ashly KLR-5000 amplifiers power the system. Six Community S-3294 three-way twelve-inch speakers, four Community VLF212 dual twelve-inch subwoofers, and six Community VLF118 single eighteen-inch subwoofers comprise the new sound reinforcement system for the dance floor. Existing distributed ceiling-mounted loudspeakers contribute to even coverage throughout the establishment.

“When I first heard of the Ashly KLR Series, the price seemed too good to be true,” Demmer said. “But I still see classic Ashly amps still running day-in and day-out in the field. They build things to last. So I bought a pair of KLR-5000s to power some subwoofers, and they were beat to death. But they held their own, and now I’m happy to install them to deliver high-performance systems on a budget. In addition, they are lightweight and energy-efficient, which are both great selling points.”

Demmer once had a service issue with an Ashly amplifier. “I understand that even well-made things break every so often,” he said. “What impressed me was how great and speedy Ashly’s service was. They turned it around immediately and got it back to me in a matter of a few days.”

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A.

www.ashly.com

SYMETRIX ARC-WEB USER CONTROL INTERFACE AND JUPITER APP-BASED TURN-KEY DSP CLINCHES THE TITLE FOR SAM’S SPORTS GRILL

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE: Sam’s Sports Grill opened in 2000, and Nashvillians have voted it the Best Sports Bar in the city for ten years in a row. Clearly, Sam Sanchez and his team know how to deliver a great sports bar experience. Food created from scratch (with gluten-free options!), dozens of beers on tap, and a whopping 70-inch flat screen TV with all the major sports packages, make Sam’s Sports Grill a winner. However, like any establishment, Sam’s Sports Grill had room for improvement. Recently, Sam chose Darrin Fabish, account manager at Nashville’s Audio Electronics, Inc. (AEI), to overhaul the existing sound system at the Hillsboro Village location. The overhaul resulted in replacing all the speakers and adding a Symetrix Jupiter 8 App Based Turn-Key DSP. The Symetrix Jupiter 8 DSP delivers multi-zone content with user control achieved through Symetrix’ forward-thinking ARC-WEB interface for smartphones and other Internet-connected devices.

Sam’s Sports Grill’s Hillsboro Village location (there are three others in Hendersonville and Murfreesboro, TN and Florence, AL) is just a short walk from the AEI offices. “I meet some friends there for lunch regularly,” said Darrin. “As sometimes happens, I was talking to them about upgrading another client’s sound system when Sam overheard me. Although the bar has a great visual setup with plenty of high-definition screens, the audio system lacked zoned audio. Although they could have different games on at the bar and on the patio, the whole place had to listen to one or the other – or music.”

After determining that AEI could give Sam’s Sports Grill a fresh start, Darrin suggested replacing components of the old system. “Eight-ohm speakers were wired for 70-volt and vice versa,” he said. “Residential and commercial components were mixed. This system really needed attention.” Darrin retained the original inputs to the system, two DirecTV receivers, a jukebox, and a music source, and added a microphone input for use on bar trivia night. In addition, a pair of TOA amplifiers and the existing equipment rack were repurposed in the new system.

With eight mic- or line-level inputs and eight outputs, a Symetrix Jupiter 8 DSP forms the core of the new system and leaves a few inputs and outputs for the bar to grow into. “The Jupiter 8 has all of the necessary processing facilities, including easy zone management,” said Darrin. “And given everything that it can do, it’s very competitively priced.” Three zones now comprise the system so that the patio, bar, and seating areas can all have different input sources and volumes. When music is selected, the background music source plays unless a customer plays the jukebox, in which case the background music is muted until the jukebox song is finished. A Bose FreeSpace 3 combined subwoofer/full-range system provides output for each of the zones, and Bose DS-100 surface mounted speakers in the patio lure customers from the sidewalk outside.

“Symetrix’ ARC-WEB technology was a huge selling point at Sam’s,” said Darrin. “Both the owner and the manager are running ARC-WEB from their phones. There’s really something to the fact that these guys can just walk over to a zone and adjust the input and volume right then and there. No more adjusting the volume and then walking over to see if it’s loud enough (or too loud). They seem to really like it. I’m starting to pitch this Symetrix-based solution at other locations. A lot of the owners are young and hip, and they love the ARC-WEB technology.” For those rare occasions when the owner or manager isn’t around, staff can still make necessary adjustments from a hardwired Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix engineers high-end professional audio solutions, specializing in DSP hardware and software. Symetrix products are distributed worldwide, and designed and manufactured in the U.S. at the Seattle area headquarters. Since 1976, customers have enjoyed the benefits of Symetrix’ independent ownership and management. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

DANLEY UPS THE SPLS ON ITS SH SERIES OF SYNERGY HORNS

GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA: Not content to rest on its laurels, Danley Sound Labs announces improvements to many of its already highly-regarded SH-Series full-range loudspeakers. The new versions are identified by the suffix “HO,” which stands for “high output.” For example, the if one wishes to get the most performance out of the Danley SH-96 they should order the Danley SH-96 HO. The new designs use a more powerful two-way high frequency. As a result, the low- and mid-frequency drivers can now be driven to their full potential while still maintaining Danley’s characteristic frequency response, phase response, and fidelity. In conjunction, the new designs use a new crossover and have additional options for bi-amping and for changing the low-frequency impedance. Because the cabinets themselves haven’t changed, the new versions retain the coverage and frequency loss patterns of the originals. The new models include the SH-95 HO, SH-96 HO, SH-64 HO

“The original versions can be easily modified to become the new ‘High Output’ versions,” explained Ivan Beaver, lead engineer at Danley Sound Labs. “It just takes the new high frequency driver, a new crossover, and a new switch panel.” In addition, the midrange drivers are also wired a little differently, which is incorporated as part of the new crossover wiring harness. “There are two options on the new switch panel,” said Beaver. “First, there’s a biamp/passive switch. In passive mode, the new cabinets run pretty much like the old versions, except that the mid/high section will be relatively louder than the woofers, assuming the woofers are running at 8ohms.”

He continued, “And that’s the second option. Users can select a woofer impedance of either 2ohms or 8ohms. Some people do not like to run at 2ohms, whereas others may need the additional output when using smaller amplifiers. The wire run should also be considered when choosing the impedance. With a 2ohm load there will be more loss across the wire. How much loss will depend on the size of the wire and the length of the run. An 8ohm load will have a higher damping factor than a 2ohm load, and it is of course easier to bridge an amp into an 8ohm load than into a 2ohm load.” In biamp mode, the mid/high section takes the crossover circuitry and the low section thus has no built-in crossover.

Because the new switch panel cannot be expected to operate reliably if left exposed to the elements, weatherized versions of the new High Output loudspeakers must be pre-ordered with specified biamping and impedance settings.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology. www.danleysoundlabs.com

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