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KanexPro Introduces Mini Audio Amplifier with Mic Mixer

KanexPro the leading A/V Connectivity solutions provider is proud to introduce the Mini Audio Amplifier is a quarter-rack width digital amplifier (Class D) with equalizer control and Mic mixer. It’s a simple yet powerful device delivering 2×20 Watts@4Ohm default output with built-in volume/ bass feature. It also supports dual mono-output with 2 stereo audio selectable inputs. The Microphone mixer includes independent volume control with balance switching. Supports balanced/ unbalanced signals.

This Mini Audio Amplifier is mainly used during lectures, house of worship centers and various musical events where mic mixing together with equalizing audio is critical.
Mini Class D audio amplifier

Features:

• Fast switching audio amplifier
• 2×20 Watt@4Ohm as the default amplifier output
• Bridge connection supported by switching the amplifier to be 1x40Watt@8Ohm
• Supports Dual-mono output
• Built-in Microphone mixer (separately controllable)
• Line audio output, with volume controllable.
• MIC input supports 48V phantom power
• MIC port with balanced switching suppress
• Supports balanced/ unbalanced signals
• Supports Ducking power technology
• Ultra low inrush current
• Two stereo audio inputs, switchable by button, remote or RS232.
• Volume/Bass/Treble controllable by buttons or RS232
• Optional control by IR remote
• Convection cooled, antistatic case design
• LED indicator, for power and operating status
• IR remote (optional) not included
• Internal Universal power adaptable (100-240 volt AC, 50/60Hz)

About KanexPro™

Leveraging our core strength in professional A/V products, KanexPro carries a complete selection of A/V connectivity needs. When planning digital installations you will find that we carry a broad line of A/V connectivity products enabling you to broadcast, extend, split, or multiply HD signal transmissions; simply and cost-effectively.

KanexPro is a registered trademark. All other trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Updated Edition of Industry Standard Book Released – Show Networks and Control Systems by John Huntington

Author, educator, and industry veteran John Huntington has released Show Networks and Control Systems, the completely updated and revised edition of his industry standard reference text, which was previously titled, Control Systems for Live Entertainment. The book includes an in-depth examination of the control and networking technology used in lighting, lasers, sound, stage machinery, animatronics, special effects, and pyrotechnics used in concerts, theme parks, theatre, themed retail, cruise ships, museums, interactive performing arts, and special events.

“With the increasing impact and ubiquity of networking in our market, I felt a new edition with an expanded networking focus was important,” comments Huntington. “So, I completely reorganized the content; checked, updated, and expanded the information; and added a lot more information. And, to reflect the changes in the market I also changed the title.” There are 30 new pages of material including dramatically expanded show networking technology along with real-world examples for reference and graphical aids have been added to help navigate through the information, as well as a glossary. Huntington has presented the information in a form readable straight through by motivated, independent readers, while also making the structure modular enough to be useful for working professionals, educators, and students. In addition, Huntington is now posting supplemental video lectures for each chapter on his website, www.controlgeek.net.

As in the previous editions, he focuses not on gear, which constantly becomes obsolete, but on techniques and standards, because Huntington thinks it’s critical that people know not only the ‘what’ but the ‘why’ of entertainment technologies. “Though I’ve tried not to be extremely technical, this is a field of ever-increasing technological complexity,” comments Huntington. “It’s important for the average technician to learn how to put together reliable systems and make sure the show actually happens.”
The well-received book is quickly becoming an industry ‘must read’ for both working professionals and educators, as noted in much of the praise of Show Networks and Control Systems:

“We also tell our newly hired engineers that they should be conversant with the entire contents of this book because it covers the core knowledge commonly needed in the design of show control systems.” – Glenn Birket, P.E., President, Birket Engineering, Inc.

“This book is the definitive guide for designing and using network technology across a wide range of live performance applications. It’s a must-read for designers, technicians, and engineers of all experience levels.” – Steve Terry, VP of Research & Development Electronic Theatre Controls

“Most technicians can learn to use show networking and control equipment. They accomplish this by reading manuals and taking classes. Exceptional technicians understand how their gear works inside and out. They accomplish this by reading John Huntington’s book.” – Jason Potterf, Cisco

“John Huntington’s book provides an invaluable introduction to networking for entertainment systems, helping students build a foundation and vocabulary for systems integration across lighting, sound, media, scenery, and more.” – David Boevers, Professor, Carnegie Mellon School of Drama

“This book presents these indispensable techniques and concepts in clear, concise terms and examples. It’s easily the best resource for anyone needing a better understanding of where entertainment control technology is today and where it’s headed in the future.” – Scott Fisher, President, Fisher Technical Services

Show Networks and Control Systems retails for $50 USD and is available through John Huntington’s website at www.controlgeek.net.

Book Information
List Price: $50.00
7.5″ x 9.25″ (19.05 x 23.495 cm)
Black & White bleed on white paper
492 pages
Zircon Designs Press, ISBN-13: 978-0615655901

About the Author
John Huntington, a trusted expert in the field of entertainment and show control, is a professor at New York City College of Technology/CUNY (“City Tech”), and has worked with major companies and venues throughout the entertainment industry, including The Metropolitan Opera, Radio City Music Hall, Production Arts Lighting, Associates and Ferren, Thoughtful Designs/PRG, the Yale School of Drama, and the Tribecca Film Festival. Huntington has had more than 40 articles published in magazines such as Lighting and Sound America, Protocol, Live Design, Lighting Dimensions, TD&T, and Theatre Crafts. He is a member of IATSE Local #1, has a CCENT certification, a New York State Class B Laser Operator’s Certificate of Competence, was a Subject Matter Expert for the PLASA ETCP Entertainment Electrician certification exam, and is an ETCP Recognized Electrical Trainer. He lives and works in New York City and blogs at www.controlgeek.net.

NEW DANLEY SM-80 DELIVERS FIDELITY AND OUTPUT ON A STICK

danley_sm_80.JPGGAINESVILLE, GEORGIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: Danley introduces the SM-80, the latest in its SM-series of lightweight, cost-effective molded-horn loudspeakers. Tom Danley and the crack engineering team at Danley Sound Labs created the SM-80 for anyone who needs loud, and yet highly-articulate sound in a lightweight, portable package. Indeed, the SM-80 weighs in at a mere 65 lbs., a comfortable mass to perch atop more

ASHLY AMPLIFIERS PREFERRED IN THE MASKING SYSTEMS OF DYNASTY SOUND

HOUSTON, TEXAS – SEPTEMBER 2012: Leon Cortese is the owner of Dynasty Sound, a Houston, Texas-based company that specializes in providing sound masking solutions for buildings and offices both large and small. Cortese himself has been in the business for over forty years. Now his children and grandchildren work for Dynasty Sound, giving the company’s name a very literal spin. In recent years, Cortese has designed his masking systems using Ashly multi-channel amplification, often with integrated processing, citing its cost-effective pricing, bulletproof reliability, and flexible functionality, not to mention the affable Ashly staff.

“There are a few exceptions, but basically all we do is masking,” said Cortese. “Some people say that’s boring, but not to me. Every time someone says they need a masking system – which is common and becoming more common – my cash register rings!” Cortese has installed literally thousands of masking systems, and today, Dynasty Sound installs between 10,000 and 15,000 loudspeakers a year.

“In the old days, everybody had an office, which made masking much less critical than it is today,” explained Cortese. “Today, companies put people in cubicles, and all of their conversations float throughout that space. Masking serves two purposes. First, it alleviates the potential distractions caused by so many conversations, and second, it brings companies in line with privacy laws. It used to be that companies piped in music to create an ‘environment,’ but music is much more personal today than it was then. If you pipe music into an office of workers these days, you’re pretty much guaranteed to have a large fraction of them hating what you’re playing.” In contrast, employees won’t argue over whether you should play pink or brown noise.

When he started out in the business, the amps that Cortese worked with were all tube-based. He has thus witnessed the tremendous technological advances that led to the modern amplifier. “There are several reasons why we only install Ashly amplifiers,” said Cortese. “First and foremost, they make one of the few eight-channel, two-rack space amplifiers that deliver greater than 125 watts per channel. Using the Ashly ne8250.70pe allows me to install twice as many loudspeakers, and I can avoid buying and installing a separate DSP by using the ne8250.70pe’s optional onboard DSP. It is a tremendously cost-effective solution.” Cortese reports that his company has installed between 400 and 500 Ashly amplifiers and that only one of them didn’t work perfectly right out of the box. “The people at Ashly are wonderful,” he said. “They are very easy to work with and are always ready to lend assistance.”

Every job is different and comes with its own idiosyncrasies and nuances, but they also share many commonalities. For example, a well-distributed masking system requires a loudspeaker for approximately every 144 feet, and except for where architectural concerns prevent it, Cortese places the loudspeakers above the hung ceiling. “Instead of pointing downward like a normal speaker, they point up,” he said. “That way the noise fires up, hits structure, and rains down like a sprinkler.”

Dynasty Sound most recently completed masking systems in the new 28-story building of Hess Oil Company in Houston. Delivering masking to every office space required 28 eight-channel Ashly ne8250.70pe amps and 10 four-channel Ashly ne4250.70pe amplifiers. “For that job, we mostly used loudspeakers that were placed in the sheetrock,” Cortese said. “With Ashly’s optional DSP tools built right into the amps, it’s very quick to install them, give them a quick EQ curve, and rock and roll.”

Now well into his 60s, Cortese shows no signs of slowing his active lifestyle, and his enthusiasm for creating functional masking systems has never been greater.

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

SYMETRIX SOLUS 16 AUTOMIXES ST. ANTHONY CLARET CATHOLIC CHURCH

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: The modest sanctuary of St. Anthony Claret Catholic Church in Anaheim, California is of an airy and lovely modernist design. It was at the height of architectural fashion when it was built in the late 1950s and has again come into vogue in the new century. However, its unintelligible sound reinforcement system was hardly state-of-the-art when installed decades ago, and unlike a fine wine, time did not make it sound any better. As the church’s musical ambitions and spoken word requirements grew through the years, Reverend Rudolph Preciado contacted Newport Beach-based 7K Solutions to remedy the antiquated audio. Paul Dexter, owner of 7K Solutions, used an open-architecture Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 processor to create a system with twelve open inputs that could automix itself.

“Reverend Preciado will be retiring soon, and he wanted to do something great for the church before he left,” said Dexter. “The old sound reinforcement system was not performing well. An early-1980s rack of analog processing and amplification that had become ever-more ‘Frankensteined’ through the years drove a ceiling full of eight-inch, full-range loudspeakers.”

When it was constructed, the church used a charming pipe organ as the sole musical source and had only modest spoken word requirements. Today, the pipe organ is joined by a choir and, for some services, by a band that mixes itself on stage. Three microphones cover the choir, and Dexter replaced the band’s old mixer with an Allen & Heath MixWizard. Instead of a boundary mic at the altar, St. Anthony Claret now uses three wireless headset microphones for the priests, one wireless handheld microphone, and four optional podium microphones.

The Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 is an open-architecture, stand-alone unit that provides sixteen mic/line inputs and eight outputs. The routing, logic, and signal processing that Dexter programmed was quite involved and reflected the specific uses and contexts of each input. For instance, the band’s input will not duck for any other input. In contrast, all of the microphones will duck in response to the headset microphones. Dexter used Symetrix’ time-tested auto-gain algorithm on all of the microphones to ensure that individuals with both quiet and loud speaking voices receive ideal reinforcement.

“I started using Symetrix processing several years ago,” said Dexter. “I’m not the sort of person who’s into taking classes and certifications, so I appreciate how really intuitive SymNet Designer is. But things always come up, and I can call the Symetrix support staff any time and speak with someone who is knowledgeable and interested. My question gets answered and I move on. The SymNet Solus 16 was the perfect solution at St. Anthony Claret because I knew sixteen inputs would be ample and eight outputs was all that were needed. The open-architecture programming would allow me to customize the system for the very particular needs of this church.”

In addition to some clever processing inside the SymNet Solus 16, Dexter corrected the intelligibility problem with a generous helping of acoustical treatment and a single, nearly-point source loudspeaker cluster. “The walls, ceiling, floor, and pews are all quite reflective,” he said. “It was originally meant to amplify the pipe organ.” Dexter placed absorptive panels on the ceiling, sidewalls, and back wall, taking care to match colors so that the aesthetic of the church wouldn’t be compromised. He placed several panels on the ceiling near the central loudspeaker cluster so as to minimize intelligibility-degrading early reflections. The loudspeakers are Fulcrum Acoustic DX1265s, powered by Powersoft amplifiers.

Just a single Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote provides all of the user control for the system. Dexter fixed the sanctuary’s output volume and then provided ten steps of volume control for wireless microphones (as a group), the podium microphones (as a group), the choir microphones (as a group), and the band’s on-stage mixer. Additional menu pages provide output volume for the choir monitor (which contains all content except the choir mics) and the cry room. Behind the scenes, the SymNet Solus 16 provides additional zone control for the foyer and each main loudspeaker. Zoning out the loudspeaker cluster allowed Dexter to shade and tune each element to deliver even coverage from the front seat to the back wall.

“Taken together, the system is very effective,” said Dexter. “It sounds great, and they don’t need an audio tech on hand. Reverend Preciado tested the system with us, and he walked all around the room, overjoyed by how clear everything sounded. And it’s so easy to use that we never had to provide a formal training session. The Reverend just pushed some buttons on the ARC-2e, and he understood exactly how it works.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

IC Live Turns The Tables For Oslo’s Modern Church

Oslo, Norway, September 2012… The Sofiemyr church in Oslo is a striking modern building, with bare brick walls, a tiled floor and wooden ceiling. Light pours in from a huge stained glass window and other windows in the corners.

The audio solution, supplied by Benum A/S, is equally striking, with a pair of inverted IC Live arrays, flown from the ceiling alongside the matching subwoofers, above a small performance stage. The technique has been used before – England’s Stage Audio Services was possibly first to experiment with it, flying a pair of IC Live arrays upside down at trim height for a standup comedy tour of UK theatres, which allowed the beams to be angled at the ground floor audience as well as the balconies. But this is almost certainly the world’s first permanent installation to use the configuration, which has many benefits in a tall space.

Geir Kristoffersen, manager of the consulting department of COWI for Acoustics and Electro Acoustics, Sound and Vision, who designed the system for the church and frequently mixes it, explains: “This room is a cube, essentially, 16 by 16 metres with a height of about 12 metres, so it’s very interesting acoustically. But it’s turned 90 degrees so that you get some angles towards the speakers.” Slots in the ceiling provide low frequency absorption.

Although on the face of it a highly reverberant space, the actual reverb time is just 1.7 seconds with a very well controlled low end. “But still, 1.7 seconds is significant,” he points out. However, the bare brick walls are an inevitable challenge in view of their capability to deliver slapback echo to the stage.

The church is also equipped with a pipe organ, which is quite frequently played together with a band and a grand piano, as well as a movable pulpit, which is taken out during modern-style worship services.

“The loudspeaker system is flown in the form of a pair of Renkus-Heinz IC Lives,” says Kristoffersen. “We’re very happy with the sound of it. In fact, I’ve never worked with a system that’s so easy and quick to get good sound out of,” he says.

“It works exceptionally well for this kind and size of room and with such a wide variety of music. Together with the choir, we often have a worship team of eight people singing with their vocal microphones. Last Sunday, for example, the choir was seated directly in front of the loudspeakers and I had my measurement system at the desk and I was pumping 90db A weighted but flat out it was giving 101dB. Yet there was no issue with feedback,” he continues.”With these digitally steerable arrays we get tightly controlled beams, which allow us to deflect the sound away from these noisy brick walls,” he explains, adding, “While there is some reverberation, of course, if you shoot straight into these walls then you’d have a big problem with slapback.”

The system is configured with two beams from each IC Live, one pair aimed at the front part of the congregation, the others at the rear. The result, says Kristoffersen, “is that the sound is completely uniform wherever you are standing or sitting.”

“What I like the most about this system – and I’ve worked with good systems all my life – is that because it’s a true line array and not a banana hang it creates a cylindrical wave, which means that it doesn’t excite the room as much as a traditional three-box system, which would have been our obvious alternative,” he says, and adds, “Another thing is that, with a choir, the choir bench is high, which means the microphones are right in front of the loudspeakers, yet we have never had any feedback problems. Because it’s so even sounding across the frequency spectrum you don’t get response spikes which then become the problem, especially with the choir-mic scenario.”

Tuning is performed using both RHAON and in an Allen & Heath IDR8 DSP processor with an Allen & Heath T112 control surface, allowing it to be controlled from two different places.

A small delay system provides extra coverage into a small annexe at the rear and in the side halls, using CFX-61R cabinets, again controlled over RHAON and CobraNet. These are matched with six CF-121M cabinets for monitors, which can also be deployed as a portable PA in the larger side room of the church, or outside during the summer.

He continues, “It’s also very good for the monitoring because despite it being so loud up there it doesn’t feedback even when it’s rock’n’roll loud. Also,” he adds, “we work a lot with the grand piano and, for me, a grand piano has to sound good. If the grand piano doesn’t sound good then it’s nearly worse than having the drum kit not sounding right, but even when we’re pushing rock’n’roll levels and there’s a monitor there next to it, if you do push it to feedback it’s not high-end feedback but a just rumble, which tells you that the total room is just playing too loud. It’s very impressive and we’re extremely happy.”

###

Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

DPA Microphones Help The Fukada Tree To Bloom

Internationally renowned recording engineer and lecturer Akira Fukada made an enormous impact at the New York AES Convention in 1997 when he unveiled the Fukada Tree seven microphone arrangement – a totally new technique for recording orchestral music in surround sound for subsequent broadcast or CD release.

Developed to resolve some of the problems engineers had encountered when trying to record spatial environments with traditional omni-directional microphones, the Fukada Tree clarified microphone positioning and also incorporated directional microphones for main and environmental sounds.

Akira Fukada originally developed the Fukada Tree while working for Japanese state broadcaster NHK, but since 2011 he has been CEO of his own company, Dream Windows Inc., that consults on a wide range of music recording, special sound design and audio issues. From the outset, Mr. Fukada specified DPA microphones as best suited to his Tree arrangement because they offer a rich bass and high frequency sound that doesn’t blot during the recording process. These were supplied by DPA’s Japanese distributor Hibino, with whom Mr. Fukada has subsequently presented a number of seminars and workshops explaining the Fukada Tree.

“I insist on using DPA microphones because I like the transparent feel they deliver,” he explains. “When recording piano, for example, they give me the clear attack sound and the beauty of reverberation when the sound attenuates. Their wide dynamic range and rich bass vigorously catches the expression of an orchestra, while for string ensembles recorded in a studio, they capture the rich overtones and give a better feeling of air.”

Since first announcing the Fukada Tree arrangement, Akira Fukada has made a number of positioning modifications to improve front localization, but his choice of microphones remains constant and continues to be DPA.

He says: “The LL/RR microphones on both sides are intended to pick up the orchestrated sound expanse and a smooth sound envelope covering the front and rear sections of the hall. However, I don’t use LL/RR microphones for small music ensembles. My arrangement incorporates DPA 4011A directional microphones and DPA 4006A omnidirectional microphones from the Reference Standard Microphone Series. The configuration of the tree can vary depending on the hall’s acoustic characteristics, while the intervals at which the microphones are placed can also change to conform to the size and formation of the orchestra.”

Ken Kimura, DPA Microphones’ Regional Sales Director, Asia Pacific, says: “Following the upgrade and release of our finest Reference Standard Microphones, and given Mr. Fukada’s requirement for the best audio equipment, I’m very pleased to see that he continues to rely upon our 4006A, 4011A, and 4015A mics for his recording sessions under Dream Windows Inc.”

In recent months Mr. Fukada has used DPA microphones and The Fukada Tree to record a number of prestigious projects including capturing Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 with the Saito Kinen Orchestra, directed by Seiji Ozawa.

“I also use DPA microphones for projects that don’t require the Tree,” he says: “Recently I used a DPA 4006 on a Decca Tree stereo configuration to pick up string ambience in a studio setting. I also use a DPA 4015 wide cardioid ORTF for piano, and if I am recording acoustic guitar I like to use a DPA cardioid 4011 XY. For me, DPA microphones are indispensable because they suit any musical instrument and provide all the accuracy that I need.”

-ends-

Editors’ information:
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphones and microphone solutions for professional applications in studio, broadcast, theatre, video/film and sound reinforcement environments. All DPA microphones and components are manufactured at the company’s purpose-built factory in Denmark.
For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

Allstage Pro Adds Yamaha Networking System to Extron’s THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon

BUENA PARK, CA–THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon is Anaheim’s premier dining and country music venue. A restaurant and upscale saloon with separate entrances, it comprises 20,000 square feet of restaurant, wine cellar, live country music, and dancing.

THE RANCH is the longtime dream and vision of Andrew Edwards, president and owner of Extron Electronics, a leading manufacturer of professional AV system integration products for over 29 years. A passion for food, wine, country music and dancing prompted Edwards to create THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon. In developing a live music venue like THE RANCH Saloon, all sound quality and design was handpicked by Edwards. Allstage Pro (Santa Ana) owner, Ian Ingram worked closely with Edwards and Extron Electronic’s Application Engineer Consultant, John Fish, in selecting an elaborate EtherSound networking system in the saloon.

The system includes two Yamaha M7CL digital audio consoles, using the M7CL control surface at front of house connected to a Yamaha NAI network interface, AD8HR mic pre amp, and EtherSound cards, all running off a Yamaha DME64 digital mixing engine.

“Andrew wanted us to design and install a system that would be both analog and digital, user friendly, acceptable for most riders, and one that he could be proud of,” said Ingram. “The idea of using the M7CL control surface to NAI and AD8HR gives us the best of both worlds.”

Allstage Pro also designed and integrated a comprehensive lighting system to provide a wide variety of lighting scenes and visual effects for featured concert acts. A total of 83 lighting fixtures, the majority of which are LED based, were installed in conjunction with the elaborate electrical infrastructure.

Ingram said using Yamaha’s EtherSound networking system was essential in creating a great system with an amazing light show that would make everyone say “Wow!”

For more information on THE RANCH, please visit www.theranch.com.

For more information on Allstage Pro, visit www.allstagepro.com.

For more information on Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

Photo ID: L to R: House engineer Mark Bjork and Allstage Pro’s Ian Ingram

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

API APPOINTS SOURCE DISTRIBUTION NEW UK DISTRIBUTOR

Pictured from left to right: Dan Zimbelman, API Director of Sales; Steve Angel, Source/HHB Director of Sales; Ian Jones, Source/HHB Managing Director; and Gordon Smart, API Managing Director posing behind the vintage API Legacy console at British Grove Studios, owned by Mark Knopfler.

JESSUP, MARYLAND – AUGUST 2012: API, manufacturer of professional analog recording consoles and outboard processors, has appointed London-based powerhouse Source Distribution as exclusive distributor for its full range of products throughout the United Kingdom. Source, a division of HHB Communications, brings over 35 years of industry experience to the partnership, as well as a client list that includes the BBC, Sky, CNN, and Abbey Road, among others. The company is well known for serving its clients not only with great products and equipment, but also with comprehensive educational and technical support. The addition of API signal processing modules and consoles significantly extends the breadth and depth of high-end analog processing available to Source and HHB clientele.

“We’re very pleased to be working with the great people at Source/HHB,” said Dan Zimbelman, director of sales at API. “HHB Communications has been in this business for almost as long as API has, and the staff’s consistent professionalism and unfailing habit of exceeding expectations has earned HHB a large and loyal client base throughout the UK. It’s a great time for API to broaden our reach throughout the UK market.

“API is a legend in the world of professional recording, and we’re proud to sell its punchy, ‘American’ analog sound on our side of the pond,” said Ian Jones, owner and managing director at HHB Communications. “From its modular lunchbox series to its dedicated rack mount gear, and from its small-frame 1608 to its large-frame Legacy and Vision consoles, API occupies a unique niche in the industry. After all, every audio professional knows what is meant by the phrase, ‘the API sound.’ Is there any other company with this type of name recognition or reputation in this industry? Just watch us run with API.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX PROMOTES BROOKE MACOMBER TO DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – AUGUST 2012: Symetrix announces that its former Director of Business Development, Brooke Macomber, is now Director of Marketing. In her new role, Macomber will manage the planning and execution of Symetrix’ worldwide promotional efforts so as to support the company’s continued growth. Macomber possesses nearly a decade of experience in the professional audio industry, familiarity with Symetrix’ operations, and both an MBA and a Global Business Certificate from the University of Washington, which together put her in an excellent position to increase Symetrix’ market share in the United States and abroad.

“Brooke came to Symetrix in 2006 to serve as our Sales and Marketing Manager,” said Paul Roberts, who recently vacated the Vice President of Sales and Marketing position to assume the responsibility of CEO for Symetrix. “After that, she rose to become Director of Business Development, and I’m very pleased that she will now serve as our Director of Marketing. Brooke’s personality and expertise will undoubtedly guide Symetrix to ever greater success.” Macomber will report directly to Roberts. Her expanded department is will be responsible for all areas of marketing, advertising, PR, communications, and business development.

“I am eager to take on the Director of Marketing role,” said Macomber. “Symetrix’ strength is founded on an unwavering commitment to empower customers with robust, affordable, forward-thinking professional audio DSP hardware and software. We listen to what audio professionals want, we deliver brilliant products that answer those calls, and we stand behind our work. The coming year will undoubtedly be one of our biggest. Our R&D calendar is packed with amazing new product releases, and with the recent introductions of SymNet Edge and SymNet Radius, there is a lot for me and my team to promote. I look forward to working with the extremely talented individuals in the Symetrix sales and marketing department, and I look forward to supporting our customers and end users in every way possible through honest and engaging marketing and communications.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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