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Season 7 of Rachael Ray Moves to New Studio and Yamaha Consoles Move Along As Part of ‘the Mix’

BUENA PARK, Calif.—On September 17, 2012 the Rachael Ray Show will officially move to beautiful new digs for the Season 7 opener, and broadcast mixer Bob Aldridge and front of house mixer John Bates, are taking along their trusty Yamaha M7CL-48 and DM2000 Digital Consoles. Produced by CBS Television Distribution and KWP Studios, in association with Harpo Studios, Scripps Networks and Watch Entertainment, the hugely successful syndicated daytime program originally launched in the fall of 2006.

“An M7CL-48 and DM2000 are both used for the audience mix,” states Bates. “The DM2000 is the production mix desk while the M7CL is used for the music mix.” Aldridge and Bates are also using the new Dugan-MY16 card with the DM2000 to tighten up the show’s sound, and Aldridge said ‘it works great.’

“Season 1 of the Rachael Ray Show had the M7CL as the audience console and it worked quite well as both the production and music console,” says Bates. “We had 16 RF mics, some production inputs, and support for 24 channels of music inputs. Then the show decided that we should be ready to support 32 channels of music inputs and the M7CL was no longer big enough so we moved it to the monitor position. Shows rarely get smaller as they develop, and it was at that point that we brought in a Yamaha DM2000, some outboard mics preamps fed through a bunch of Yamaha MY16-AT ADAT cards, bringing us up to 56 mic inputs, and mixed both production and music on the DM2000 through the end of Season 6.”

The Rachael Ray Show set has several different locations that Rachael could be in at any point in time,” notes Bates. “We took advantage of the Yamaha DM2000 to recall different scenes depending on where in the studio we were working. The four remote layers enable us to customize the surface layout for the scene at hand. The built-in channel and bus delays allow us to really dial in the mix without the need for any outboard processing.

The number of music inputs the mixers have been asked to support has increased to 48 so the decision was made to add an additional M7CL-48 to the house position to mix music and the DM2000 becomes a production only console. “We now can split 48 mic channels between broadcast mix, FOH mix and monitor mix, a far cry from where we started,” adds Bob Aldridge.
All of the features that made the DM2000 a great fit for the show before are still in play in the new studio and Bates said it’s been fun stripping back the show and building it up again.

For more information on the Rachael Ray Show, visit http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/.

For more information on Yamaha products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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PHOTO ID: L to R: John Bates and Bob Aldridge

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Westbury National Show Systems: Years of Success with Yamaha Consoles

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Westbury National Show Systems in Toronto, Canada is the largest Yamaha console rental company in all of Canada. The company recently provided audio production for several high profile events including Fashion Cares featuring a performance by Elton John at the Sony Centre in Toronto. Three Yamaha PM5D-RH consoles were used for the front of house mix along with a DSP5D Expander and an LS9-16. A Yamaha PM5D, PM1D and 02R were used for monitors.

“We have always found Yamaha consoles to be dependable, world-class touring consoles that are requested by many of the world’s top touring acts,” states Bob Groza, audio department manager. “They are intuitive and ergonomically designed; the control surface layout provides ease of operational use.”

Westbury also provided two Yamaha PM5D-RH consoles, a PM5D and DSP5D Expander for the recent Jump For Jamaica event, celebrating Jamaica’s 50 Years of Independence, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in mid August with approximately 1,500 guests, including Premier Dalton McGuinty, Senator Don Meredith and Jamaica’s High Commissioner to Canada, Sheila Sealy.

And, earlier in August, the company supported audio for the Hillside Festival with performances by Kathleen Edwards, The Arkells, and others. With several thousands in attendance, Westbury provided three Yamaha PM5D-RH digital consoles, a DSP5D expander and a Yamaha LS9-32 digital console.

“We stand by our use of Yamaha consoles because they are proven and dependable, and we never have to worry about performance and durability,” says Groza.

Westbury’s Yamaha digital console arsenal consists of a PM1D, a PM5D-RH, PM5D, DSP5D Expander, three M7CLs, three LS9-32s, six LS9-16s, and a DM2000. For those requiring analog, the company has a PM4000 for FOH and a PM4000M available for monitors.

For more information on Westbury National Show Systems, visit www.westbury.com.

For more information on Yamaha consoles, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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PHOTO ID: Photo 1: Hillside Festival Photo 2: Jump for Jamaica

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

NEW SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS 12X8 PROCESSOR RUNS HAGMYREN – A SWEDISH HORSE RACING TRACK

HUDIKSVALL, SWEDEN – SEPTEMBER 2012: Hudiksvall is a medium-sized city of 15,000 on the Gulf of Bothnia, and one of its major attractions is Hagmyren, a horse racing track situated north of the city’s center. The main track at Hagmyren is 1,000 meters, and the sprawling area that the public uses to watch the races, and to enjoy the facility’s other events, covers seven acres and can comfortably accommodate the city’s entire population. In addition to races, Hagmyren hosts fun events, like car bingo (where participants sit in their cars and play bingo) and horse exhibitions. Because of its multiple uses and because quality sound reinforcement was deemed an important component of the track’s continued success, the track sought to renovate its aging system. A new system centers on a pair of Symetrix’ newly-released SymNet Radius 12×8 processors, which feature open-architecture programming, fixed I/O, Dante networking, and a competitive price.

“These days, a modern horse racing track depends on excellent sound reinforcement that is flexible and easy to use,” said Börje Jälmefors, sales manager with Visono Media AB, the company that sold the SymNet Radius 12x8s. “There are many other amusements vying for people’s attention and money, and horse racing is competing with them. Moreover, the races are broadcast around the region and around the globe, so the sound quality must be superb.” The requirements set forth by the track owners were that the new system must be future-proof, scalable, flexible, and intuitive to operate, even for a non-expert. The track owners hired sound installation company DAT AB to develop and install an appropriate solution. “After investigating the options available on the market, DAT AB recognized the advantage of going with the SymNet Radius 12×8,” said Jälmefors. “A pair of SymNet Radius 12x8s could handle all of the processing, sharing signals via the Dante bus, at a very competitive price point.”

Inputs to the system include the referee’s wireless microphone, the commentators’ microphones, a paging system, various pre-recorded music feeds, audio from various pre-recorded video feeds, and output from a live mixing console. Both of the Symetrix SymNet Radius 12x8s accept either mic-level or line-level inputs. Because they are networked together via the Dante bus, signals input to one unit can be sent to the output of the other unit with truly negligible latency. Their combined sixteen outputs feed a rack of QSC amplifiers, which power loudspeakers by TOA, RCF, and Phillips throughout the facility in appropriate zones.

“Robert Nilsson of DAT AB told me that the two SymNet Radius 12x8s, with their built-in Dante bus, made it easy to meet all of the complicated requirements of this installation,” reported Jälmefors. “For my part, I have been working with Symetrix equipment for twenty years – including an installation I did a few years ago on another horse racing track that used Symetrix open-architecture DSP – and so I feel very confident recommending Symetrix. The Dante bus used by the new SymNet Edge and SymNet Radius system is easy to set up and represents an excellent standard for installed, live, and broadcast audio.”

Currently, users control the system via Symetrix modular wall panel remotes – the ARC-SW4e and ARC-K1e. “We are very satisfied with the solution Robert Nilsson came up with,” said Mats Österberg, the manager of Hagmyren. “The most crucial aspect for us was a control interface that is user-friendly and easy to understand. The wall panels Robert gave us meet that requirement.” Jälmefors added, “There are so many user control options available for the SymNet Radius 12×8 system. They range from a simple contact closure to the range of ARC panels and from the customized SymVue computer interface to many third-party solutions. But the staff at Hagmyren is most excited about Symetrix’ ARC-WEB, which places user control of the system on any smartphone! DAT AB will give them ARC-WEB in the coming months.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

KanexPro Introduces Mini Audio Amplifier with Mic Mixer

KanexPro the leading A/V Connectivity solutions provider is proud to introduce the Mini Audio Amplifier is a quarter-rack width digital amplifier (Class D) with equalizer control and Mic mixer. It’s a simple yet powerful device delivering 2×20 Watts@4Ohm default output with built-in volume/ bass feature. It also supports dual mono-output with 2 stereo audio selectable inputs. The Microphone mixer includes independent volume control with balance switching. Supports balanced/ unbalanced signals.

This Mini Audio Amplifier is mainly used during lectures, house of worship centers and various musical events where mic mixing together with equalizing audio is critical.
Mini Class D audio amplifier

Features:

• Fast switching audio amplifier
• 2×20 Watt@4Ohm as the default amplifier output
• Bridge connection supported by switching the amplifier to be 1x40Watt@8Ohm
• Supports Dual-mono output
• Built-in Microphone mixer (separately controllable)
• Line audio output, with volume controllable.
• MIC input supports 48V phantom power
• MIC port with balanced switching suppress
• Supports balanced/ unbalanced signals
• Supports Ducking power technology
• Ultra low inrush current
• Two stereo audio inputs, switchable by button, remote or RS232.
• Volume/Bass/Treble controllable by buttons or RS232
• Optional control by IR remote
• Convection cooled, antistatic case design
• LED indicator, for power and operating status
• IR remote (optional) not included
• Internal Universal power adaptable (100-240 volt AC, 50/60Hz)

About KanexPro™

Leveraging our core strength in professional A/V products, KanexPro carries a complete selection of A/V connectivity needs. When planning digital installations you will find that we carry a broad line of A/V connectivity products enabling you to broadcast, extend, split, or multiply HD signal transmissions; simply and cost-effectively.

KanexPro is a registered trademark. All other trademarks and registered trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Updated Edition of Industry Standard Book Released – Show Networks and Control Systems by John Huntington

Author, educator, and industry veteran John Huntington has released Show Networks and Control Systems, the completely updated and revised edition of his industry standard reference text, which was previously titled, Control Systems for Live Entertainment. The book includes an in-depth examination of the control and networking technology used in lighting, lasers, sound, stage machinery, animatronics, special effects, and pyrotechnics used in concerts, theme parks, theatre, themed retail, cruise ships, museums, interactive performing arts, and special events.

“With the increasing impact and ubiquity of networking in our market, I felt a new edition with an expanded networking focus was important,” comments Huntington. “So, I completely reorganized the content; checked, updated, and expanded the information; and added a lot more information. And, to reflect the changes in the market I also changed the title.” There are 30 new pages of material including dramatically expanded show networking technology along with real-world examples for reference and graphical aids have been added to help navigate through the information, as well as a glossary. Huntington has presented the information in a form readable straight through by motivated, independent readers, while also making the structure modular enough to be useful for working professionals, educators, and students. In addition, Huntington is now posting supplemental video lectures for each chapter on his website, www.controlgeek.net.

As in the previous editions, he focuses not on gear, which constantly becomes obsolete, but on techniques and standards, because Huntington thinks it’s critical that people know not only the ‘what’ but the ‘why’ of entertainment technologies. “Though I’ve tried not to be extremely technical, this is a field of ever-increasing technological complexity,” comments Huntington. “It’s important for the average technician to learn how to put together reliable systems and make sure the show actually happens.”
The well-received book is quickly becoming an industry ‘must read’ for both working professionals and educators, as noted in much of the praise of Show Networks and Control Systems:

“We also tell our newly hired engineers that they should be conversant with the entire contents of this book because it covers the core knowledge commonly needed in the design of show control systems.” – Glenn Birket, P.E., President, Birket Engineering, Inc.

“This book is the definitive guide for designing and using network technology across a wide range of live performance applications. It’s a must-read for designers, technicians, and engineers of all experience levels.” – Steve Terry, VP of Research & Development Electronic Theatre Controls

“Most technicians can learn to use show networking and control equipment. They accomplish this by reading manuals and taking classes. Exceptional technicians understand how their gear works inside and out. They accomplish this by reading John Huntington’s book.” – Jason Potterf, Cisco

“John Huntington’s book provides an invaluable introduction to networking for entertainment systems, helping students build a foundation and vocabulary for systems integration across lighting, sound, media, scenery, and more.” – David Boevers, Professor, Carnegie Mellon School of Drama

“This book presents these indispensable techniques and concepts in clear, concise terms and examples. It’s easily the best resource for anyone needing a better understanding of where entertainment control technology is today and where it’s headed in the future.” – Scott Fisher, President, Fisher Technical Services

Show Networks and Control Systems retails for $50 USD and is available through John Huntington’s website at www.controlgeek.net.

Book Information
List Price: $50.00
7.5″ x 9.25″ (19.05 x 23.495 cm)
Black & White bleed on white paper
492 pages
Zircon Designs Press, ISBN-13: 978-0615655901

About the Author
John Huntington, a trusted expert in the field of entertainment and show control, is a professor at New York City College of Technology/CUNY (“City Tech”), and has worked with major companies and venues throughout the entertainment industry, including The Metropolitan Opera, Radio City Music Hall, Production Arts Lighting, Associates and Ferren, Thoughtful Designs/PRG, the Yale School of Drama, and the Tribecca Film Festival. Huntington has had more than 40 articles published in magazines such as Lighting and Sound America, Protocol, Live Design, Lighting Dimensions, TD&T, and Theatre Crafts. He is a member of IATSE Local #1, has a CCENT certification, a New York State Class B Laser Operator’s Certificate of Competence, was a Subject Matter Expert for the PLASA ETCP Entertainment Electrician certification exam, and is an ETCP Recognized Electrical Trainer. He lives and works in New York City and blogs at www.controlgeek.net.

NEW DANLEY SM-80 DELIVERS FIDELITY AND OUTPUT ON A STICK

danley_sm_80.JPGGAINESVILLE, GEORGIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: Danley introduces the SM-80, the latest in its SM-series of lightweight, cost-effective molded-horn loudspeakers. Tom Danley and the crack engineering team at Danley Sound Labs created the SM-80 for anyone who needs loud, and yet highly-articulate sound in a lightweight, portable package. Indeed, the SM-80 weighs in at a mere 65 lbs., a comfortable mass to perch atop more

ASHLY AMPLIFIERS PREFERRED IN THE MASKING SYSTEMS OF DYNASTY SOUND

HOUSTON, TEXAS – SEPTEMBER 2012: Leon Cortese is the owner of Dynasty Sound, a Houston, Texas-based company that specializes in providing sound masking solutions for buildings and offices both large and small. Cortese himself has been in the business for over forty years. Now his children and grandchildren work for Dynasty Sound, giving the company’s name a very literal spin. In recent years, Cortese has designed his masking systems using Ashly multi-channel amplification, often with integrated processing, citing its cost-effective pricing, bulletproof reliability, and flexible functionality, not to mention the affable Ashly staff.

“There are a few exceptions, but basically all we do is masking,” said Cortese. “Some people say that’s boring, but not to me. Every time someone says they need a masking system – which is common and becoming more common – my cash register rings!” Cortese has installed literally thousands of masking systems, and today, Dynasty Sound installs between 10,000 and 15,000 loudspeakers a year.

“In the old days, everybody had an office, which made masking much less critical than it is today,” explained Cortese. “Today, companies put people in cubicles, and all of their conversations float throughout that space. Masking serves two purposes. First, it alleviates the potential distractions caused by so many conversations, and second, it brings companies in line with privacy laws. It used to be that companies piped in music to create an ‘environment,’ but music is much more personal today than it was then. If you pipe music into an office of workers these days, you’re pretty much guaranteed to have a large fraction of them hating what you’re playing.” In contrast, employees won’t argue over whether you should play pink or brown noise.

When he started out in the business, the amps that Cortese worked with were all tube-based. He has thus witnessed the tremendous technological advances that led to the modern amplifier. “There are several reasons why we only install Ashly amplifiers,” said Cortese. “First and foremost, they make one of the few eight-channel, two-rack space amplifiers that deliver greater than 125 watts per channel. Using the Ashly ne8250.70pe allows me to install twice as many loudspeakers, and I can avoid buying and installing a separate DSP by using the ne8250.70pe’s optional onboard DSP. It is a tremendously cost-effective solution.” Cortese reports that his company has installed between 400 and 500 Ashly amplifiers and that only one of them didn’t work perfectly right out of the box. “The people at Ashly are wonderful,” he said. “They are very easy to work with and are always ready to lend assistance.”

Every job is different and comes with its own idiosyncrasies and nuances, but they also share many commonalities. For example, a well-distributed masking system requires a loudspeaker for approximately every 144 feet, and except for where architectural concerns prevent it, Cortese places the loudspeakers above the hung ceiling. “Instead of pointing downward like a normal speaker, they point up,” he said. “That way the noise fires up, hits structure, and rains down like a sprinkler.”

Dynasty Sound most recently completed masking systems in the new 28-story building of Hess Oil Company in Houston. Delivering masking to every office space required 28 eight-channel Ashly ne8250.70pe amps and 10 four-channel Ashly ne4250.70pe amplifiers. “For that job, we mostly used loudspeakers that were placed in the sheetrock,” Cortese said. “With Ashly’s optional DSP tools built right into the amps, it’s very quick to install them, give them a quick EQ curve, and rock and roll.”

Now well into his 60s, Cortese shows no signs of slowing his active lifestyle, and his enthusiasm for creating functional masking systems has never been greater.

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

SYMETRIX SOLUS 16 AUTOMIXES ST. ANTHONY CLARET CATHOLIC CHURCH

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: The modest sanctuary of St. Anthony Claret Catholic Church in Anaheim, California is of an airy and lovely modernist design. It was at the height of architectural fashion when it was built in the late 1950s and has again come into vogue in the new century. However, its unintelligible sound reinforcement system was hardly state-of-the-art when installed decades ago, and unlike a fine wine, time did not make it sound any better. As the church’s musical ambitions and spoken word requirements grew through the years, Reverend Rudolph Preciado contacted Newport Beach-based 7K Solutions to remedy the antiquated audio. Paul Dexter, owner of 7K Solutions, used an open-architecture Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 processor to create a system with twelve open inputs that could automix itself.

“Reverend Preciado will be retiring soon, and he wanted to do something great for the church before he left,” said Dexter. “The old sound reinforcement system was not performing well. An early-1980s rack of analog processing and amplification that had become ever-more ‘Frankensteined’ through the years drove a ceiling full of eight-inch, full-range loudspeakers.”

When it was constructed, the church used a charming pipe organ as the sole musical source and had only modest spoken word requirements. Today, the pipe organ is joined by a choir and, for some services, by a band that mixes itself on stage. Three microphones cover the choir, and Dexter replaced the band’s old mixer with an Allen & Heath MixWizard. Instead of a boundary mic at the altar, St. Anthony Claret now uses three wireless headset microphones for the priests, one wireless handheld microphone, and four optional podium microphones.

The Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 is an open-architecture, stand-alone unit that provides sixteen mic/line inputs and eight outputs. The routing, logic, and signal processing that Dexter programmed was quite involved and reflected the specific uses and contexts of each input. For instance, the band’s input will not duck for any other input. In contrast, all of the microphones will duck in response to the headset microphones. Dexter used Symetrix’ time-tested auto-gain algorithm on all of the microphones to ensure that individuals with both quiet and loud speaking voices receive ideal reinforcement.

“I started using Symetrix processing several years ago,” said Dexter. “I’m not the sort of person who’s into taking classes and certifications, so I appreciate how really intuitive SymNet Designer is. But things always come up, and I can call the Symetrix support staff any time and speak with someone who is knowledgeable and interested. My question gets answered and I move on. The SymNet Solus 16 was the perfect solution at St. Anthony Claret because I knew sixteen inputs would be ample and eight outputs was all that were needed. The open-architecture programming would allow me to customize the system for the very particular needs of this church.”

In addition to some clever processing inside the SymNet Solus 16, Dexter corrected the intelligibility problem with a generous helping of acoustical treatment and a single, nearly-point source loudspeaker cluster. “The walls, ceiling, floor, and pews are all quite reflective,” he said. “It was originally meant to amplify the pipe organ.” Dexter placed absorptive panels on the ceiling, sidewalls, and back wall, taking care to match colors so that the aesthetic of the church wouldn’t be compromised. He placed several panels on the ceiling near the central loudspeaker cluster so as to minimize intelligibility-degrading early reflections. The loudspeakers are Fulcrum Acoustic DX1265s, powered by Powersoft amplifiers.

Just a single Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote provides all of the user control for the system. Dexter fixed the sanctuary’s output volume and then provided ten steps of volume control for wireless microphones (as a group), the podium microphones (as a group), the choir microphones (as a group), and the band’s on-stage mixer. Additional menu pages provide output volume for the choir monitor (which contains all content except the choir mics) and the cry room. Behind the scenes, the SymNet Solus 16 provides additional zone control for the foyer and each main loudspeaker. Zoning out the loudspeaker cluster allowed Dexter to shade and tune each element to deliver even coverage from the front seat to the back wall.

“Taken together, the system is very effective,” said Dexter. “It sounds great, and they don’t need an audio tech on hand. Reverend Preciado tested the system with us, and he walked all around the room, overjoyed by how clear everything sounded. And it’s so easy to use that we never had to provide a formal training session. The Reverend just pushed some buttons on the ARC-2e, and he understood exactly how it works.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

IC Live Turns The Tables For Oslo’s Modern Church

Oslo, Norway, September 2012… The Sofiemyr church in Oslo is a striking modern building, with bare brick walls, a tiled floor and wooden ceiling. Light pours in from a huge stained glass window and other windows in the corners.

The audio solution, supplied by Benum A/S, is equally striking, with a pair of inverted IC Live arrays, flown from the ceiling alongside the matching subwoofers, above a small performance stage. The technique has been used before – England’s Stage Audio Services was possibly first to experiment with it, flying a pair of IC Live arrays upside down at trim height for a standup comedy tour of UK theatres, which allowed the beams to be angled at the ground floor audience as well as the balconies. But this is almost certainly the world’s first permanent installation to use the configuration, which has many benefits in a tall space.

Geir Kristoffersen, manager of the consulting department of COWI for Acoustics and Electro Acoustics, Sound and Vision, who designed the system for the church and frequently mixes it, explains: “This room is a cube, essentially, 16 by 16 metres with a height of about 12 metres, so it’s very interesting acoustically. But it’s turned 90 degrees so that you get some angles towards the speakers.” Slots in the ceiling provide low frequency absorption.

Although on the face of it a highly reverberant space, the actual reverb time is just 1.7 seconds with a very well controlled low end. “But still, 1.7 seconds is significant,” he points out. However, the bare brick walls are an inevitable challenge in view of their capability to deliver slapback echo to the stage.

The church is also equipped with a pipe organ, which is quite frequently played together with a band and a grand piano, as well as a movable pulpit, which is taken out during modern-style worship services.

“The loudspeaker system is flown in the form of a pair of Renkus-Heinz IC Lives,” says Kristoffersen. “We’re very happy with the sound of it. In fact, I’ve never worked with a system that’s so easy and quick to get good sound out of,” he says.

“It works exceptionally well for this kind and size of room and with such a wide variety of music. Together with the choir, we often have a worship team of eight people singing with their vocal microphones. Last Sunday, for example, the choir was seated directly in front of the loudspeakers and I had my measurement system at the desk and I was pumping 90db A weighted but flat out it was giving 101dB. Yet there was no issue with feedback,” he continues.”With these digitally steerable arrays we get tightly controlled beams, which allow us to deflect the sound away from these noisy brick walls,” he explains, adding, “While there is some reverberation, of course, if you shoot straight into these walls then you’d have a big problem with slapback.”

The system is configured with two beams from each IC Live, one pair aimed at the front part of the congregation, the others at the rear. The result, says Kristoffersen, “is that the sound is completely uniform wherever you are standing or sitting.”

“What I like the most about this system – and I’ve worked with good systems all my life – is that because it’s a true line array and not a banana hang it creates a cylindrical wave, which means that it doesn’t excite the room as much as a traditional three-box system, which would have been our obvious alternative,” he says, and adds, “Another thing is that, with a choir, the choir bench is high, which means the microphones are right in front of the loudspeakers, yet we have never had any feedback problems. Because it’s so even sounding across the frequency spectrum you don’t get response spikes which then become the problem, especially with the choir-mic scenario.”

Tuning is performed using both RHAON and in an Allen & Heath IDR8 DSP processor with an Allen & Heath T112 control surface, allowing it to be controlled from two different places.

A small delay system provides extra coverage into a small annexe at the rear and in the side halls, using CFX-61R cabinets, again controlled over RHAON and CobraNet. These are matched with six CF-121M cabinets for monitors, which can also be deployed as a portable PA in the larger side room of the church, or outside during the summer.

He continues, “It’s also very good for the monitoring because despite it being so loud up there it doesn’t feedback even when it’s rock’n’roll loud. Also,” he adds, “we work a lot with the grand piano and, for me, a grand piano has to sound good. If the grand piano doesn’t sound good then it’s nearly worse than having the drum kit not sounding right, but even when we’re pushing rock’n’roll levels and there’s a monitor there next to it, if you do push it to feedback it’s not high-end feedback but a just rumble, which tells you that the total room is just playing too loud. It’s very impressive and we’re extremely happy.”

###

Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

DPA Microphones Help The Fukada Tree To Bloom

Internationally renowned recording engineer and lecturer Akira Fukada made an enormous impact at the New York AES Convention in 1997 when he unveiled the Fukada Tree seven microphone arrangement – a totally new technique for recording orchestral music in surround sound for subsequent broadcast or CD release.

Developed to resolve some of the problems engineers had encountered when trying to record spatial environments with traditional omni-directional microphones, the Fukada Tree clarified microphone positioning and also incorporated directional microphones for main and environmental sounds.

Akira Fukada originally developed the Fukada Tree while working for Japanese state broadcaster NHK, but since 2011 he has been CEO of his own company, Dream Windows Inc., that consults on a wide range of music recording, special sound design and audio issues. From the outset, Mr. Fukada specified DPA microphones as best suited to his Tree arrangement because they offer a rich bass and high frequency sound that doesn’t blot during the recording process. These were supplied by DPA’s Japanese distributor Hibino, with whom Mr. Fukada has subsequently presented a number of seminars and workshops explaining the Fukada Tree.

“I insist on using DPA microphones because I like the transparent feel they deliver,” he explains. “When recording piano, for example, they give me the clear attack sound and the beauty of reverberation when the sound attenuates. Their wide dynamic range and rich bass vigorously catches the expression of an orchestra, while for string ensembles recorded in a studio, they capture the rich overtones and give a better feeling of air.”

Since first announcing the Fukada Tree arrangement, Akira Fukada has made a number of positioning modifications to improve front localization, but his choice of microphones remains constant and continues to be DPA.

He says: “The LL/RR microphones on both sides are intended to pick up the orchestrated sound expanse and a smooth sound envelope covering the front and rear sections of the hall. However, I don’t use LL/RR microphones for small music ensembles. My arrangement incorporates DPA 4011A directional microphones and DPA 4006A omnidirectional microphones from the Reference Standard Microphone Series. The configuration of the tree can vary depending on the hall’s acoustic characteristics, while the intervals at which the microphones are placed can also change to conform to the size and formation of the orchestra.”

Ken Kimura, DPA Microphones’ Regional Sales Director, Asia Pacific, says: “Following the upgrade and release of our finest Reference Standard Microphones, and given Mr. Fukada’s requirement for the best audio equipment, I’m very pleased to see that he continues to rely upon our 4006A, 4011A, and 4015A mics for his recording sessions under Dream Windows Inc.”

In recent months Mr. Fukada has used DPA microphones and The Fukada Tree to record a number of prestigious projects including capturing Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 with the Saito Kinen Orchestra, directed by Seiji Ozawa.

“I also use DPA microphones for projects that don’t require the Tree,” he says: “Recently I used a DPA 4006 on a Decca Tree stereo configuration to pick up string ambience in a studio setting. I also use a DPA 4015 wide cardioid ORTF for piano, and if I am recording acoustic guitar I like to use a DPA cardioid 4011 XY. For me, DPA microphones are indispensable because they suit any musical instrument and provide all the accuracy that I need.”

-ends-

Editors’ information:
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphones and microphone solutions for professional applications in studio, broadcast, theatre, video/film and sound reinforcement environments. All DPA microphones and components are manufactured at the company’s purpose-built factory in Denmark.
For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

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