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Archive of the AES Newslink Category

SYMETRIX INTRODUCES SOLUS 16

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – OCTOBER 2011: Symetrix announces an addition to the SymNet Solus product line – the Solus 16. “The Solus 4 and Solus 8 already provide two of the most popular form factors requested by integrators,” said Trent Wagner, senior product manager at Symetrix. “But input counts run higher in many types of installations, and we received a barrage of requests for a higher input form factor. The Solus 16 answers that request without requiring a jump to networked DSP or separate expansion I/O devices maintaining the high value for which the Solus line is known.”

Solus is powerful SymNet DSP hardware, ideal for small to mid-sized installations not requiring I/O expansion. The entire family of SymNet hardware, including Solus, is configured using open architecture SymNet Designer software. System designers have the option to use or modify Solus DSP design templates for basic projects, or, to create unique designs entirely from scratch.

The three Solus hardware offerings differ only in their audio input and output counts: Solus 16 with sixteen inputs and eight outputs, Solus 8 with eight mic/line inputs and eight outputs, and Solus 4 with four inputs and four outputs. Ethernet, ARC port, RS-232 port, two control inputs, and four logic outputs complete the control feature set. To simplify set-up, a front panel LCD displays system settings. Solus supports Symetrix ARC wall panels, third party control systems, and SymVue, a SymNet end-user control panel application.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

API ANNOUNCES KIMLENG AUDIO AS NEW JDK DEALER

JESSUP, MARYLAND – OCTOBER 2011: After representing API for the past two years, Kimleng Audio has recently been signed as a dealer for the company’s JDK Audio line. The signing is an important step in increasing both API and JDK’s presence in the Asia Pacific.

“After meeting with Thanong Saeheng recently at the Broadcast Asia show in Singapore, I’m even more convinced that Kimleng Audio is the right way for us to go in Thailand,” said Gordon Smart, managing director at API. “They’re focused, street-smart, and tuned into the market. I don’t think we could have made a better choice.”

Thanong Saeheng, owner of Kimleng Audio, said, “We are so glad that API thought of us when it came time to make JDK a prominent audio brand in Thailand. We’re looking forward to helping the brand reach the forefront of the professional audio world.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment. www.apiaudio.com

For information on Kimleng Audio, please visit: www.KimlengAudio.com

Yamaha Training Heads to Redmond, Washington

BUENA PARK, Calif.— YCATS (Yamaha Commercial Audio Training Seminars) training sessions have been set for Overland Christian Church Redmond, Washington and open to all audio professionals, free of charge. The three-day session dates are November 8-10 from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm with classes being held for advanced users of the Yamaha M7CL digital console, a workshop for the LS9 digital console, digital network and systems design clinic, and a showcase of NEXO speaker technology (GEO Series, PS Series, 45N12, RS Series Subs, GeoSUB, and NXAMP).

The M7CL advanced training is a one-day course that will reveal the depth of the M7CL and will discuss how best to utilize the console to the full extent of its capabilities. Attendees will expand their knowledge of the console and its capabilities with an opportunity to apply what is learned using multi-track audio on the new M7CL-ES digital mixing console.

The LS9 workshop is a half-day, hands-on course, learning the basics of mixing on an LS9 digital console. Attendees will become more familiar with the console layout; learn how to navigate the system, setup mix busses as an aux or group, and how to route signal to the effects units, with an opportunity to apply what is learned using multi-track audio.

The digital network and systems design clinic is a full-day course offering an array of audio networking, acoustic system design, and systems solutions workshops. The workshops will benefit anyone interested in upgrading or designing audio systems.

Registration deadline for all sessions is November 6. To register for Yamaha class sessions, visit http://www.yamahacommercialaudiosystems.com/training.php?catID=11001.
To register for NEXO showcase, email ycats@yamaha.com.

On November 10 from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, an Audio Master Class will be held as part of the Christian Musician Summit at Overlake Christian Church with Yamaha’s Jake Cody, Mark Rush, and Peter Robinson teaching an audio boot camp for church volunteers. Cost: $99 per person. For course syllabus and registration visit: http://www.christianmusiciansummit.com/templates/cuscms/details.asp?id=32393&PID=805358.

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Minnesota Church Stays On Leading Edge of Technology With Upgrade To 96k/Optics-Capable SD10 Console

Minnesota’s Eagle Brook Church prides itself on staying at the leading edge of technology for its ever-evolving production and broadcast needs. In 2010, the thriving house of worship, which opened in late 2005 and accommodates over 2100 in stadium-style seating—retooled its overall technical infrastructure at its main Lino Lakes campus location, adding three DiGiCo SD8 consoles and DiGiRacks for FOH, monitors and video broadcast production. Flash-forward to the spring of 2011, and the audio team is at it again. Working closely with Audio Logic Systems, the latest upgrade set in motion swapped two of the SD8s at FoH and monitor world with one of DiGiCo’s newest 96k/2 gig optics-capable SD10B broadcast console loaded with the DiGiCo Waves SoundGrid plug-in bundle. They also added three SDRacks, one dedicated to the SD10 and the other two distributed within the facility. In turn, the two SD8s and DiGiRacks were migrated to the Spring Lake Park and Woodbury facilities. The changes at the main Lino Lakes campus had a ripple effect throughout, allowing all the Eagle Brook engineers at each facility to mix on similar DiGiCo platforms.

Audio mix pro Adam Bufis was brought in to work as audio director, to transition and streamline the multiple facilities, to facilitate the newest gear integrations, and to provide a mix position for the broadcast hub at the main location. With a decade of touring experience working with major Christian artists from Casting Crowns to Lincoln Brewster, and Israel Houghton for the last several years, Bufis brought a savvy technical prowess and mixing expertise to the church. The choice of the broadcast console offered many great features for live sound and for Bufis, including 5.1 surround, fader backstop solo and more.

“Originally, the radar was out to get a newer or bigger desk at our main broadcast location,” Bufis explained. “I’d mixed a ton on the SD7 and have a lot of experience on that and with DiGiCo, and really liked the added benefits available with the optical network. We started to look at what it would take to get an SD7 into our main campus as our needs were growing there. We also wanted to bump up to 96K, and I personally wanted to bring in the Waves plug-in package. So when the SD10 came out, it was almost a no-brainer just the cost-factor. With the SD8s, I was filling all 60 channels plus returning stuff with insert returns on groups, so to expand it out to a bigger channel count was almost a necessary move for us. With our ever-expanding band and orchestra, and all the loop/track/bass stuff, that starts adding up as does the input channels. Another big push for me was to get it all running on optical, using an RME MADI bridge for distribution. Before, we were running RME MADI signals to a bunch of different areas for recording and multitrack stuff. With the optical network, it just made the whole system a lot more functional and easy to use, versus flipping switches and changing routing on the MADI bridges. I can do it all basically at the desk now.

To accomplish his optical networking dream, Bufis was able to run an HMA fiber optics loop for backup redundancies and a total of 2 SD Racks, and 1 DiGiRack placed in various locations in the building—two near the stage and one in the broadcast studio—to supply the different audio feeds from each source. “The addition of the SDRacks, even at 48K took a step up! It had a much more clean and clear sound. I’ve always been a fan of the DiGiCo sound anyway, but it made a noticeable difference to us merely by just changing that. And then once we bumped up to 96K, it was even more of a noticeable difference with overall clarity and sonic performance.”

At FOH on a typical weekend, Bufis estimates Eagle Brook is running 40-45 inputs total to handle its service flow, which he says is a 50/50 mix of music and message. “We rely heavily on the production aspect for our worship experience, using LEDs, video, lighting and of course audio. We have a full band comprised of drums, bass, a few guitars, usually 4 stereo keyboard channels-worth of inputs, sometimes a small horn section of 3-5 pieces and normally we’re running anywhere from 5 to 8 background vocals and we incorporate a lot of loop-based stuff from Pro Tools. Typically, I’m running anywhere from 2-10 channels of anything from a percussive loop to a string loop to a vocal loop or whatever, and on our bigger weekends, we incorporate orchestral string sections, the biggest of which was 30-pieces, where I was running 101 analog inputs and 60 digital ones. I was able to lay the SD10 out so that I could change scenes and inputs, and to generally manage that many inputs on not a whole lot of faders for the live side of things.”

As for outputs, the SD10 is accommodating quite a few in the sanctuary for its “robust” PA. “As our room seats just under 3000 in our main campus, I have a few different hangs with group outputs going to each zone: my main L/R, main outhangs, separate controls for front, outfills and subs, and we have a 70-volt distribution system throughout the building that handles mainly overhead-type speakers that we send a feed to. I also have a full split for our broadcast suite SD8, that is outputting all 24 groups of stereo outputs to 48 digital input devices from DVRs to digital recorders to our broadcast send. We use a Mako system that utilizes microwave technology to send point-to-point signals to our other campuses, which is how they receive our simulcast message in HD video and AES audio. We have a center HD screen in each location that comes down right to the stage floor with a 6’ projected image of our pastor, and it surprises most people because it’s pretty life-like. All of that is done in HD, from the filming to the projection to the broadcast, and it’s pretty impressive. It gives the small church building a large church feel. All campuses have a live band and their own worship pastor, so outside of running our Lino Lakes simulcast sermon, it gives each of the satellite locations the opportunity to be unique.”

When asked to single out some of his favorite features on their new console, Bufis couldn’t help but rave about the SD10’s expandable GPI and GPO connections, as well as the configurable Smart Key Macros. “The GPI/GPO is huge! I love using GPI triggers out of my console to fire lobby music to start, credits to roll, and for my CD to start and stop recording—all of that is all pre-programmed in my snapshots and then controlled through GPI triggers. That, on the setup side of things, has made rolling through show time very seamless, and has taken it almost from a two-man job to a one-man position at FOH, where I’m firing everything from hardware to music. Also, I love the Smart Keys on the SD10. I love identifying them with coloring and digital labeling. Having more than just the macro buttons, I’ve started getting into more advanced shows where I have 80-100 snapshots, and it’s nice to lay those out on the Smart Keys to visually go to something quickly if I need to. I’d say those are the two biggest things I’ve found to love. However, I have to say I also really like the black color of the console. Black and gray are my two favorite colors, and the look of it is very stealthy.”

It was important for Bufis to add the Waves SoundGrid bundle in order to streamline and simplify his outboard gear. “All of our outboard gear is now completely gone; we ripped out all our BSS and Drawmer outboard stuff and now I am basically rocking the Waves SoundGrid and the console at FOH. I love all the onboard offerings from DiGiCo, but the addition of the Waves package has given the console a new character. In particular, I use the Mercury bundle quite a bit, which gives me a plethora to pick through. I use a lot of the CLA compressors on vocals and drums, and the Fairchild compressors used on bass and guitar give it an amazing character. Basically, I don’t use any onboard compression right now; most of it is done mainly through the CLA or the Fairchild’s. I do use the SSL master bus on the output of the master. I’ve started to use some of the SSL channel strips for some of the EQ and on a few vocal channels, and I use another inserted SSL or CLA EQ. Again, sonic performance is key for me and I just love the sound of some of these compressors. I’m using about 12 of the 16 racks, racked on various drums, mainly rhythm section inputs, and I’m using the compressors on vocals. I’m using one Ultramaximizer, usually on my outputs, as well as for broadcasting, so it has a more mastered sound going out to our campuses.” There are lots of things to access in my toolbox artistically.

At monitor world, he also swapped out their in-ear monitoring system. “Before we were using an Aviom system for a segment of the in-ears as we have a split of mixed ears as well as personal mixers in use. Stepping up to the new Roland M48 mixers, they have an SMADI device, which takes a MADI signal and converts it to their REAC system, allowing me to pipe a MADI signal from the console to feed to the Roland units. That too, was a pretty night-and-day upgrade for us. It has great functionality and really expanded what we do by allowing me to assign each mixer its own set of channel counts. Before, with the Aviom system, you only got a generic 16 channels to patch to. Now, with the Roland, you can patch everybody’s mixer separate from each other. It gives you a whole lot of flexibility with band members wanting specific things on those mixers.”

Bufis is running a Pro Tools rig on the FOH console, routed off a MADI connection from the SDRack and uses the GPI/GPOs to trigger the start and stop of those session files within Pro Tools. This was key in order to streamline both FOH and monitor functions into one console. The use of Smart Key Macros was key in managing monitor outputs. “The snapshots there are pretty robust and using the macros to lay those out functionally and color-code them is huge, as is the ability to rack more than two racks. We quickly grew out of just having two racks into three, and now even four and five MADI devices. So with the SD10, we can have a couple of optical racks and MADI racks needed in both those positions.”

With services on both weekend days, the audio team has built in time on Sunday morning to do a recap of previous productions. This playback is a way for everyone, including the band, to take a disconnected look and listen to the overall production experience and to share feedback on what works and what needs improvement. “We’re getting amazing feedback from them on how the whole system is performing, from the sonic quality to the mix. I would say, from musicians to pastors alike, the addition of the SD10s, SD Racks and optics, has definitely been an improvement and noticed by all, which is amazing as many of us come from a secular and Christian touring background and bring more of a show-type mentality to how things are done here. We like the term, ‘go big or go home.’ We try to stay relevant and like keep an eye out on what other houses of worship within the US are doing and I think in comparison, we fare quite high. All of us hold to a pretty high production value and standard and we’re pretty progressive on stage and set design, too. We’re constantly adding gear to stay on top of the latest technology. For us, the addition of the newest DiGiCo console was such a great thing. When I look at a console, the biggest thing for me is the sound quality. I can kind of get around hard-to-function desks or ones that may not be as intuitive if the sound quality is there. What I love about the SD10 is it has it all: a massively huge sonic quality and an easy to use, intuitive, fully functional user interface. And that for me, hands-down, is why I think it’s the best for us as a facility and for me as a mix engineer.”

Dual DiGiCo SD10s Propel Alison Krauss & Union Station’s ‘Paper Airplane’ Tour

The nearly sold-out Alison Krauss & Union Station tour this year in support of the band’s new album, Paper Airplanes, is certainly proof-positive that they’ve never been more popular, bringing a tightly knit fusion of bluegrass and country to fans old and new. Though Alison’s award-winning 2007 collaboration with Robert Plant may have briefly elevated her stature to a whole new audience it’s abundantly clear that as a group they don’t need an A-list rocker to pack the house.

Taking charge of the tour’s production is longtime audio frontman Cliff Miller of North Carolina’s SE Systems. Last summer, Miller put a pair of newly minted SD10 console through rigorous paces at the 2010 MerleFest, one of the country’s premier Americana and roots music festivals. With that experience being so positive and productive, Miller decided to entrust the Union Station tour to DiGiCo, placing the consoles at FoH and monitors for himself and monitor team Bernie Velluti and daughter Haley. The nightly challenge of presenting acoustic music in venues ranging from indoor auditoriums to outdoor sheds isn’t lost on Miller, who’s been at it for over 40 years, working with some of the most prominent artists of the genre. He says the SD10 has been a key component on this tour, showcasing the nuances of the band’s sound.

“The console is so amazingly consistent and I’m very pleased with the clean quality of sound we’re getting out of it,” Miller offered. “Mixing an acoustic band like this is probably one of the more challenging things for a digital console… it’s really the sum of all the parts and what goes into the console that affects what comes out. There’s a lot of detail with stringed instruments that you never hear with electric guitars and a lot of the other typical rock ‘n’ roll instruments. It’s important to understand the sound of these instruments because when they’re amplified, it’s literally a balancing act to get that right blend—where the sound system is equalized and isolated enough to keep the instrument resonance minimal and as natural as possible, and the low-end frequencies maintained. And that can change, too, depending on the facility and whether it’s indoor vs. outdoors. Outdoor sheds with vinyl roofs over the audience are a real challenge. There’s a lot of reflection even when you make a point of keeping the PA out of it. It’s very live. I find that even in the varying circumstances, once I get the overall PA tuned the way it needs to be, then my presets work well from day to day, inside or outside, pretty consistently. The only thing that may change is the EQ from day to day. Sometimes Ron [Block; banjo/guitar] may change the EQ on his Fishman Aura DI, depending on what he’s hearing in his ears. That affects what I’m getting at front of house, so I just compensate for that on a daily basis. I let him get it to suit his taste and then I set it to suit mine!”

In addition to the pair of SD10s, Miller’s carrying two DiGiCo SD-Racks, with one serving as an emergency spare, and loves hearing the warm, analog preamp sound.

The outboard gear is non-existent with the exception of the Lab Gruppen Dolby Lake LM 26 processor. “The way I’m inserting the Lake processor—which is digitally inserted using the AES sends and returns for my mains, front and side fills—I’m driving it with matrix outputs to the input of the delay. But on the returns, I have three stereo aux sends set up so its coming into the insert IN, so the biamped output of my Lake for my front and side fills and my stereo subwoofers are all being sent from stereo aux sends. Having the insert features is really handy on the console for driving multiple lines and getting signals. Depending on the venue, and if we’re using an in-house sound system, I’ll send all the sends off the console to analog outputs, if that’s where their inputs are. Otherwise, I can send them from the SD Rack on the stage. It’s very versatile, easy to route outputs, and you can rename them for whatever you need. You always have enough. And I really love having those two-two spaces on the SD-Rack underneath for a total of 4 rack spaces. On one side I have a UPS just as a backup in case we lose power, and on the other side, I have the Lake processor, a spare USB pre for my Smaart rig [the Rational Acoustics’ equalization software], and a receiver for a TM400 Lectrosonics test and measurement microphone. There’s not an outboard rack, you just set up the console, plug it in, and I’m ready to go!”

The core of Union Station is a 5-piece band featuring Dobro phenom Jerry Douglas, with the addition of a drummer and a keyboardist for this tour. Miller’s utilizing approximately 34 inputs for the band, much of which is dedicated to a band-wide package of Shure microphones for drums, fiddle, guitars, banjo, lap steel amp and vocals, a Neumann TLM 193 on the bass cab, as well as Fishman Aura DI’s for guitar, banjos and Dobro [the Jerry Douglas signature model], and various inputs for playback iPod, etcetera. A nightly encore finds the group singing in old-timey fashion gathered around a Shure KSM44.

Miller’s output section is fairly minimal, comprised of Left and Right outs, with the occasional Left Right Upper and Left Right Lower. “I always have a Left/Right, side fill, front fill, delay mix, and always provide an ADA house mix for the hearing impaired. One is dedicated for my Smaart computer. It’s an industry-wide reference software package that I use for tuning the sound system into the room environment itself, and for PA time alignment. It’s invaluable and I use it every day… very affordable, very versatile and it really fills a niche for me.”

Within the console, Miller’s effects rack is minimal, consisting of about 4 reverbs and 2 delays. “I’m using the simple vocal plate for Alison’s vocal and the backup vocals, and a simple delay that I use mainly for the Dobro to get a pan effect in some of the slower songs that we do. Other various reverbs I use are for percussion, and I have a warm hall delay that I use on guitars. Obviously in an auditorium, a little reverb on the instruments is always nice. It’s a pretty basic setup because, after having worked with them for 11 years, I try to be as true to the instrument’s sound—and to the recordings—as possible. The music they play has a wide dynamic range, and I like to make the most use out of that, so there’s very little compression.”

Macros and snapshots are two of the must-have features for Miller’s daily workflow. “I like being able to record a macro of an EQ setting that I can use for one particular instrument in one particular song. Typically, I have my console set up so when I have an EQ for a guitar it stays the same through all the snapshots. But when they change instruments using the same line, using the macros I can bring up the EQ I prefer when, say, Ron plays the Banjola on ‘Sinking Stone,’ which is a radically different EQ then I use for his guitar on another song. It’s very simple for me at FoH to be able to recall what I need quickly. I also have an ADK Lyve Tracker digital workstation recording 56 channels at 96K to create a ‘virtual soundcheck’. The SD-10 outputs MADI to Lyve Tracker and at the bottom of the playlist I have a playback snapshot for recalling the output from the Lyve Tracker to the inputs of the console for playback. I’m also using Time Fade a bit between songs, where they go from one song right into another. I can use that to ease in the drums and other instruments and it works very nice. I can just hit the scene and let it transition.”

The SD10 at monitor world is set up and shared for Haley Miller and Bernie Velluti to manage their respective areas—Haley for Alison specifically, and Bernie for the rest of the band. “I set the console up and layered it so I have all my channels on one side of the board and Bernie can have the other side for his. This worked well for us, and it was great to have two sets of eyes on the band at all times. I love the versatility of the board. Being the first time on a DiGiCo, I found it seemed almost limitless in how I could customize the console to my specific needs. The rotary knobs are assignable. For example I’m able to bring my head amp, high pass filter and Pan control right above my channel fader. Within a push of a button the rotary knobs toggle between my settings and Aux sends. The best feature for me, though, is the ability to control the surface offline, although it will get you in trouble if you are not careful. We have a scene for every song and everyday there are some variances in instrumentation, such as proximity of the subs, it changes day to day and affects the level of bass that is put in the ears. As well as pedal boards, they are never the same, even when you mark every knob. Making the appropriate adjustments for these channels has been so easy. Without interrupting audio within the current scene, I’m able to take the surface offline, fire any scene make changes, save and return to audio before the song ends. If I need to make the same change in all or just select scenes, I can edit Range, make the change and confirm it within all the ones selected.

“I’ve really enjoyed working with this console and it will be difficult to jump back on something else when we get back into the shop. The clarity is there for Alison, who is using the Sensaphonics 2Max earbuds with a Shure PSM 900 belt pack. She has told me, ‘It’s so clear and full’. You can really gain it up and it has such a nice fluid transition.”

That low latency rate is one of the console features that resonated with Miller, as well. “I own probably 6-7 other digital consoles now, and these were the first two DiGiCo’s I’ve purchased,” he explained, “and I couldn’t be happier with them. Quite frankly, I really like using the digital consoles we used before, but it came down to the fact that I was looking for a company that was taking advantage of the newer technologies. Having a 96k sampling rate is very important for a low latency sound—and especially for Alison’s in-ears, which is critical. Not to mention the Optocore system. The fact that I can use a tactical fiber for my whole snake line for 96 channels is great. It saves me so much time every day and in some of the situations where I run snake that can be like 500 feet long sometimes! It’s small and easy to hide up against the base of the step where no one’s tripping on it. Frankly, I couldn’t be happier with these consoles.”

“And also, I knew these consoles were going to be versatile after this tour, when we get back to business at home,” he added. “We do a lot of concerts with symphony and a rock & roll bands playing together and having a console where I can get 96 inputs and not take up anymore than 4 seats in an auditorium, 3 rows deep is great. Promoters love that! They’d rather sell tickets.”

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Sound Devices 788T Reaches New Heights in Kathmandu for Recording of Nepalese Music Album

USBPre 2 Proves Invaluable as Stand-Alone Preamp and Portable Interface

KATHMANDU, NEPAL — When Alejandro Sánchez-Samper, assistant professor and assistant director of commercial music at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) in Boca Raton, Florida, traveled to Kathmandu, Nepal, to record an album of traditional and contemporary Nepalese music earlier this year, he brought Sound Devices 788T digital audio recorder and its USBPre 2 (Sound Devices AES Booth 139) with him to do the job. Sánchez-Samper relied on the Sound Devices 788T to capture live performances for the upcoming album, titled Nepali Ho, while using the USBPre 2 as a stand-alone preamp. more

Auralex to Unveil New ProMAX Panels During AES 2011

Stand-Mounted StudioFoam Absorbers Offer Convenient, Portable Solution

NEW YORK, OCTOBER 21, 2011 — Auralex Acoustics, Inc., the industry leader in innovative sound control solutions, will be unveiling its new ProMAX Panels — stand-mounted, portable StudioFoam absorbers — during AES 2011. more

Gepco® International Launches RunOne™ Powered Speaker Cables at AES 2011

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, OCTOBER 21, 2011 — Gepco International (AES Booth #838), an industry-leading brand in professional audio and video interconnect products, is pleased to introduce a new line of powered speaker cables at the Audio Engineering Society Show (AES) October 21-23, 2011. The new Gepco® Brand RunONE™ Powered Speaker Cables combine audio and power, along with optional data, under one durable yet flexible jacket. With multiple uses for corporations, DJs, lighting rigs and tours, RunONE allows the user to run just one cable in place of multiple cables, providing a portable and neat solution that saves time and hassle.

Each RunONE cable combines one channel of power with two, eight or 12 channels of 110 Ohm balanced audio for line level, mic level or digital AES audio signals and can be used with self-powered speakers or in DMX lighting control. Additional configurations include two channels of Category 5e cable that can be used for data drops in remote power and audio applications. Snakes with optional data can also be used for digital audio transmission while running power to Front of House (FOH) for remote locations. Shielding around the power channels eliminates power noise from interrupting the audio/data signal, ensuring high-quality performance.

Terminated with industry-standard connectors, RunONE cables offer the option of Edison, IEC and Neutrik® powerCON® connectors for the power channel; 3-pin XLR, 5-pin XLR (for DMX lighting), TRS and Neutrik® convertCON® connectors for audio channels; and RJ45 and Neutrik® etherCON® connectors for optional data channels. RunONE cables are available in pre-defined and custom configurations.

“The RunONE cables are a great solution for anyone looking to save time,” said Joe Zajac, Market Development Manager for Gepco® Brand Products. “With up to 12 channels of audio combined with power and the optional two channels of data, the RunONE cables will also provide for much cleaner set-ups.”

General Cable (NYSE:BGC), a Fortune 500 Company, is a global leader in the development, design, manufacture, marketing and distribution of copper, aluminum and fiber optic wire and cable products for the energy, industrial, and communications markets. In August 2009, Gepco International was acquired by General Cable. For more information about General Cable products, please contact your local sales representative or visit our Web site at www.gepco.com or www.generalcable.com.

Gepco International has been an industry-leading brand of studio, stage and broadcast AV cables and cable assemblies for 30 years. As a complete solutions-based supplier, Gepco also offers value-added service and distribution of connectors, cable management products, patch panels, and wire and cable accessories.

Sound Devices Introduces New Mix Assist Feature for its 788T Digital Audio Recorder at AES 2011

Distinguishes Background Noise from Speech During Recording

NEW YORK, OCTOBER 21, 2011 — Sound Devices, experts in portable hard-disk recording for audio, introduces Mix Assist, a new feature for its 788T Multi-Track Digital Audio Recorder, at AES 2011 (Booth 139). This new feature is available as a no-charge firmware update to all new and existing 788T customers. more

Gepco® International Announces Addition of Two-Channel Heavy-Duty Tactical Cat 5e Cable at AES 2011

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, OCTOBER 21, 2011 — Gepco International (AES Booth #838), an industry-leading brand in professional audio and video interconnect products, is pleased to announce the addition of CTS2504HDX to the Gepco® Brand CT504HD Series of Heavy-Duty Tactical Category 5e Cables at the Audio Engineering Society Show (AES) October 21-23, 2011. An ideal solution for applications that require multiple or redundant channels of Cat 5e cables in remote production or staging applications, the CTS2504HDX 2-channel snake consists of two elements of Gepco’s CT504HDX heavy-duty tactical Cat 5e cable under an overall rugged TPE jacket for exceptional durability and flexibility.

The CT504HD series was created to meet the increased demand of audio/video professionals who require a rugged, reliable, portable and flexible cable solution. Typically, the electrical performance and bandwidth of conventional Cat 5 cable is degraded through physical damage when used in portable applications. The unique double-jacket construction of the CT504HD series eliminates this issue. While the inner jacket maintains the proper physical spacing between pairs to achieve ISO/IEC or TIA/EIA Cat 5e specifications, the durable TPE outer jacket protects the cable from physical damage or abuse.

In addition to the new CTS2504HDX, the CT504HD series of heavy-duty Cat 5e cables includes three other types. The original CT504HD has 24 AWG stranded conductors for exceptional flexibility, while the CT504HDX features 24 AWG solid conductors for lower attenuation that allows for the full, recommended TIA distances for Cat 5e network cable. With the same basic construction as the new CTS2504HDX, the CTS4504HDX is a 4-channel snake consisting of four elements of CT504HDX under an overall rugged TPE jacket.

Heavy-duty Tactical Category 5e Assemblies provide a pre-terminated cabling solution for hostile environments. The CT504HD, CT504HDX and each element of the CTS2504HDX and CTS4504HDX can be terminated with either standard Cat 5 RJ45 connectors or ruggedized Neutrik® etherCON® connectors.

“The concern among Cat 5e cable users in the professional audio/video industry has been that it isn’t durable enough to handle the traditional wear and tear associated with the workload,” said Joe Zajac, Market Development Manager for Gepco® Brand Products. “Our CT504HD series was designed specifically to meet the needs of portable applications and provides the answer to professionals who are looking for a Cat 5e solution in remote environments.”

General Cable (NYSE:BGC), a Fortune 500 Company, is a global leader in the development, design, manufacture, marketing and distribution of copper, aluminum and fiber optic wire and cable products for the energy, industrial, and communications markets. In August 2009, Gepco International was acquired by General Cable. For more information about General Cable products, please contact your local sales representative or visit our Web site at www.gepco.com or www.generalcable.com.

Gepco International has been an industry-leading brand of studio, stage and broadcast AV cables and cable assemblies for 30 years. As a complete solutions-based supplier, Gepco also offers value-added service and distribution of connectors, cable management products, patch panels, and wire and cable accessories.

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