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SYMETRIX ROOM COMBINE 788 DELIVERS FLEXIBILITY AND FIDELITY AT THE LAKELAND CENTER

LAKELAND, FLORIDA: Known as one of Central Florida’s most venerable entertainment complexes, The Lakeland Center challenges the notion that a facility can’t be all things to all people. The sprawling complex includes venues for sports, entertainment, events, meetings and hospitality and despite the breadth of offerings The Lakeland Center consistently exceeds the expectations of its clients, attendees and guests. Creating such a professional atmosphere requires tremendous flexibility on the part of The Lakeland Center’s facilities and staff, a fact underscored by its recent upgrade to a Symetrix Room Combine 788 processor in one of its three modular meeting/event spaces. The Symetrix Room Combine 788 allows The Lakeland Center’s technical staff to merge or split any combination of rooms using an intuitive interface, with comprehensive, high-fidelity signal processing as a bonus!

Using air walls, the 25,000 square-foot facility divides into as many as eight separate spaces of varying size. The old room combiner was installed in the mid-1990s and operated on outdated mechanical relays. “It worked okay,” said Joseph Havens, the technical director at The Lakeland Center. “We installed it and used its limited flexibility to create a few common configurations. It had no DSP and no analog processing of any kind. Recently, the unit gave up the ghost.” Havens removed its carcass and committed to finding a modern replacement.

Based on its flexibility and power, he chose the purpose-built Symetrix Room Combine 788, which takes up to twelve inputs and matrix mixes them into eight outputs. “As many of the technicians on my staff do not have expertise in the arena of installed sound, I had to have a combiner that was intuitive to operate,” said Havens. “The user interface on the 788 is second to none. The new system is very friendly and not at all intimidating.” Indeed, Symetrix’ simple-to-use software allowed Havens to draw a schematic of the event space on the user interface with each of the eight smaller sections outlined. To combine or un-combine sections, his technicians simply highlight the relevant sections on the schematic.

To allow clients a measure of control, Havens positioned a Symetrix ARC-K1 rotary encoder in each of the eight sections to control volume. Because each ARC-K1 receives its power and communicates with the Room Combine 788 via a single Cat5 cable, the installation was painless. “At each position, we used the cable from the old system to pull a fresh Cat5 into place,” said Havens.” That allowed us to keep the power supply in the main rack with the 788. The ARC-K1s communicate with the processor and, ultimately, each other (their controls become redundant when sections are combined) via a star topology. It couldn’t have been easier.”

Although The Lakeland Center was, first and foremost, installing a new room combiner, it received a hi-fi bump as a bonus. “The existing loudspeakers and amps were in good shape, so we left them alone,” said Havens. “Nevertheless, just hooking up the Symetrix Room Combine 788, without turning any processing on, significantly improved the system’s fidelity. Before, it had always had that ‘ceiling speaker’ sound, with an emphasis on the midrange. Now it was fuller and richer.” Havens didn’t stop there however, he used the Room Combine 788′s collection of filters, equalizers, and dynamics processors to dial in an even finer sound.

Havens’ experience installing the Symetrix Room Combine 788 was so pleasant, and the functionality it affords The Lakeland Center is so substantial, he now plans to preempt failures in the center’s two other large, combinable event/meeting spaces by installing 788s there as well. “In those spaces, we’ll definitely take advantage of the unit’s ability to combine non-adjacent rooms,” he said.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

METRIC HALO RELOCATES TO SUN-DRENCHED FLORIDA

mhllogolarge_for-white.jpgSAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA: Without snow shovels and down jackets, Metric Halo is in the process of moving to the Tampa Bay area during the holiday break. A beautiful 10,000-square foot facility in Safety Harbor, Florida will serve as the company’s new management, manufacturing and research & development nerve center. Remarkably, every single member of the Metric Halo staff is moving with the company, which means no break in continuity creativity or sales for Metric Halo’s loyal users. Only the company’s address and phone number will change.

“After a lifetime of braving winter in New York, we’re done,” said Joe Buchalter, president of Metric Halo. “While I’m pretty sure that some of us will be back to the Northeast to visit friends and family, the operative word is ‘visit.’” Metric Halo is timing the move to minimize disruption. The office, shipping, and support departments more

WIRELESS FIRST/CLAIR GLOBAL PROVIDE LIVE AND BROADCAST AUDIO FOR CMT ARTISTS OF THE YEAR SHOW

cmt_awards_2011.JPGNASHVILLE, TENNESSEE – DECEMBER 2011: The Country Music Television (CMT) Artists of the Year celebration honors five country music artists who stand at the top of the field with an evening of live music at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena. This year, Rob Lowe hosted the proceedings, which included heartfelt performances by the five honorees: Taylor Swift, Jason Aldean, Lady Antebellum, Brad Paisley, and Kenny Chesney. As in the past, CMT hired Wireless First, a Clair Global Company to simultaneously provide live sound reinforcement and broadcast sound (the show aired in mid-December), along with RF equipment and expertise. In addition to the impactful Clair i3 line array system, which stays out of television sightlines, Clair Global brought two new products: a custom-built portable RF microphone podium and the CF 1090 Fractal Antenna. Both provided tangible benefits over existing technologies that allowed the crew to accomplish such more

BEHIND THE SCENES, MONTRÉAL’S NEW CONCERT HALL RUNS ON SYMETRIX DSP

MONTRÉAL, CANADA – DECEMBER 2011: After long enduring a substandard concert hall, the Montréal Symphony Orchestra was recently blessed with the La Maison Symphonique de Montréal. Built to exacting acoustical standards by Tateo Nakajima of Artec Consultants, La Maison will host a wide range of musical and theatrical performances. While most of the publicity surrounding the building’s opening is justifiably centered on the stunning, state-of-the-art acoustical experience that awaits its patrons, La Maison is just as sophisticated behind the scenes. Indeed, Artec Consultants designed a comprehensive, yet intuitive paging system that will ensure that the production quality of the events at La Maison will meet the highest expectations. Philippe Beaudoin of Montréal-based A/V integrator Solotech programmed and installed the Symetrix SymNet-based signal processing and interface technology that makes the powerful and elegant paging system possible.

Six zones comprise the paging system. The lobby zone conveys pages for patrons, typically before performances and during intermission and retransmits the audio captured within the hall for late arrivers. [Basically, there's a camera that captures the video and sends to displays on all 3 levels of the lobby and a microphone gets the audio and sends to the paging system] Based on their physical layout and intended usage, there are two separate dressing room zones. The stage manager’s booth, the recordist’s booth, the house audio mixer, the follow spot operators and the lighting board op, get their own zone. The venue managers’ offices get their own separate zone. The final zone patches through the main audio mixer into the house sound system. Over three-hundred McBride 820CXB paging loudspeakers powered by two QSC CX-204V and two QSC-1202 amplifiers deliver the paging system’s output.

The linchpin of La Maison’s paging system is the Symetrix ARC-SW4 and ARC-XLR, a pair of wall panel remotes with integrator-programmable push buttons and an XLR jack. Room managers and stage managers have their own Symetrix ARC-SW4 and ARC-XLR to handle outgoing pages, and each one is configured the same way. Two mobile racks can be plugged and patched from different areas of the venue for temporary needs of traveling productions and events. Of its eight buttons, six are labeled by zone. To deliver a page, the user pushes a button for each of the zones that he or she wants to include. Then a push-to-talk button, combined with a Shure 527B microphone, executes the page. Additional features include a push-button chime, which calls patrons to the hall prior to a performance or after an intermission, and a volume control override button. Although it may find other uses, the volume override button’s intended purpose is to deliver urgent messages, such as when a musician or the conductor needs to be called from the dressing room to the stage.

An open-architecture Symetrix SymNet 8×8 DSP, supplemented by a Symetrix Control I/O, sits in the middle of the system. It ably handles the complex routing required of the system, along with all of the frequency and dynamics processing nuances that make the pages not only functional, but also pleasant. “Symetrix delivered on two essential features that make the paging system at La Maison comprehensive, easy-to-use, and cost-effective,” said Beaudoin. “First, it has a wealth of flexible logic modules, which meant that I could design the system to hang together robustly. Second, the ARC remotes convey logic controls and audio on a single Cat5 cable with very liberal distance restrictions. That made the physical installation as easy as it could possibly be.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

METRIC HALO ULN-2 SURVIVES HAITIAN FIRE

CARREFOUR, HAITI – DECEMBER 2011: Bad things sometimes happen to good people. While he was working for Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) as a hospital administrator in troubled Haiti, Eyal Tapiero volunteered his spare time and expertise to record some remarkably talented hip-hop artists in the community. But just days before his return to Canada, Tapiero arrived to his Haitian residence to find it engulfed in flames. His MacBook Pro was burned, his backup drive and music collection were destroyed, and his Metric Halo ULN-2 emerged from a drawer as hot as if it had been roasted in an oven.

“During my time in Haiti, I developed a close bond with many of my Haitian coworkers and found that some of them had aspirations of being hip-hop stars,” Tapiero said. “They had talent, but they couldn’t afford to get demo tapes made.” While on holiday break in Canada, Tapiero decided to take some recording equipment back to Haiti in order to do a little production work in his free time. “I wasn’t looking to do anything too complicated,” he said. “I had my MacBook Pro, Sennheiser HD 25 headphones which were invaluable for monitoring and tracking, a Shure SM57, Audix i5, CAD GXL-3000, and an M-Audio Oxygen 25 key midi controller and my trusty ULN-2 all running through Ableton Live.”

Despite less than ideal recording conditions, the raw talent and spirit of the performers were making the tracks sparkle with life. The noise of the nearby highway, the loud generator that droned day and night, and the intolerable heat could not deter those in the mesmerizing grip of musical inspiration. The Metric Halo ULN-2 and MacBook Pro were ideal. With minimal fuss and with immunity to the city’s frequent power outages, Tapiero captured some high-quality tracks. “We had two monitor mixes, full recording, and full metering all through one box running power from a laptop,” he said.

His residence fire occurred just one week shy of Tapiero fulfilling his one-year contract with Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF). The neighbors reported that the fire raged for at least twenty-five minutes before it was subdued. “I was devastated,” Tapiero said. “I lost all my personal belongings and electronic equipment. My backup drive, which held all of our recordings and production archives, was destroyed. My music collection was destroyed. None of my friends ever got a final copy of the demo tape. It was terrible. While the ULN-2 had escaped direct contact with the flames, I thought its insides were fried for sure but I still held on to it.”

Several months later, Tapiero learned the insurance for the fire fell through. And since he was constantly traveling and without a new computer, Tapiero didn’t see the value in having the ULN-2 looked at by a professional. “But back in Canada, my brother urged me to give it another try,” he recalled. “So, I plugged the ULN-2 into to his MacBook Pro with nothing more than a FireWire cable and a dim hope. But to my surprise, it worked! We tested all the ports and functions, and everything was working as it should. I was shocked and I couldn’t believe my luck!”

Inspiration restored, Tapiero has begun saving up for a new MacBook Pro. Thanks to the intervention of Metric Halo’s Allen Rowand and the generosity of Alto Music (a Metric Halo and Apple dealer), Tapiero will get his new laptop faster than he thought.

“Tapiero wrote to thank us for making a product that could withstand the torture test of being in a burning room,” said Rowand. “After I read his letter I contacted Jon Habor at Alto to see if he could do anything to help out and he immediately agreed. It’s always terrible when someone loses their property, but it’s even worse when it happens to someone who’s doing humanitarian work. We’re happy that we can help Tapiero get back to recording.”

To find out more about the humanitarian backdrop for this story, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF), interested readers can visit:
MSF Canada: http://www.msf.ca
MSF USA: http://www.doctorswithoutborders.com

ABOUT METRIC HALO
Based in New York’s Hudson Valley, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware. www.mhlabs.com

Dual DiGiCo SD8 Systems At ZZ Top’s 1st Annual La Grange Fest Blow Away Band’s Live Sound & Satellite Radio Broadcast

ZZ Top pulled off their very first La Grange Fest in late October, pairing the timeless Tejas boogie kings with Southern rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd and country singer Jamey Johnson. Set just outside Austin in Bee Cave, the fest—and subsequent live broadcast on Sirius XM radio—was accomplished using DiGiCo‘s SD8 at the hands of the band’s engineer, Jamie “Jamo” Rephann. Both Jamo and monitor engineer Jake Mann have been rockin’ SD8s (Mann on an SD8-24) for several years on the band’s tours with production partner Clair Brothers.



The SD8 was in place when Jamo inherited the gig from engineer buddy Toby Francis. “He’d been raving about the DiGiCo’s and I just decided to go with it,” Jamo recalled. “I had been previously using a Venue Profile for AFI and The Mars Volta, but after hearing the difference between the Avid and DiGiCo, I was sold on the SD8, and don’t want to use anything else from now on.”



But it is the sonic quality of the SD8 that induces raves from the veteran engineer. “The DiGiCo sound is the best I’ve heard on a digital desk of any make or model, and I’ve used all of them from the Yamaha MC7 to the Midas XL8. Side-by-side, the SD8 smokes them both. I didn’t touch anything but a Midas XL 4 for like 10 years, and am a huge Midas fan… but they don’t hold a candle to the DiGiCo’s. The real difference came after mixing on a Venue Profile for 2 years (with a Big Ben as an external word clock). I ran some CD’s and was amazed at the sonic quality I was hearing. Everything was in the 160-500Hz area and the ‘air’ from 8-12k was back, almost like a great analog desk! I couldn’t believe my ears and was already kicking myself for not trying this desk earlier. It has the quality of a smooth analog sounding desk and I couldn’t be happier.”



The console’s I/O section and onboard features have proved versatile for handling the various house systems the 3-piece encounters from gig to gig. “I’m using a total of 38 inputs for ZZ Top, not including the 4 audience mics. I also have as many as 8 outputs a night to drive a variety of house systems—L, R, Sub, Center, Outfill, Delays, Smart, and SMPT for video that we run through my desk to lighting. I really love the delays on the output section, available on every output, and EQ and compression if you want it. But I have to tell you, I cannot live without using the multiband compressors on a few things because of the DiGiCo sound. They’re super-transparent and really do a wonderful job with everything I use them on. I use the multibands on both channels of vocals, kick and snare channel inserts, bass group, synth bass and guitar group. Also, the regular comps and gates sound great as well. They’re very smooth and warm-sounding with no “pumping” as it were. Additionally, I do some channel splitting and panning things on the guitars. I have 3 guitar channels that I make stereo and pan all the way. I’m also using my control groups to do most of my mixing as well as the normal subbing out of kick, snare, bass, vocals, guitars, and etcetera. Then I’ll use the compressors on the subgroups if needed… it kind of melds things together, if you will, a bit better in my opinion.”
 


With space often an issue in venues and on festival dates, the SD8′s compact footprint has paid off. “It’s really comes in handy so many times when space was an issue. I just use the desk and an easy tilt so I roll up with nothing other than a Smart tablet and my desk. It has really helped me get in and out at many festivals with a minimum of space and hassle.”



The band is recorded on every gig, which serves several functions, including virtual soundchecking. “Monitor engineer and resident SD8 guru Jake Mann multitracks each show using an RME MADIface card into a MacBook Pro using Logic,” explained Jamo. “And since the band does not soundcheck at all, virtual soundcheck is KEY to my show every day.”



At the LaGrange Festival, working in tandem with the Sirius and Skynyrd’s audio crews only reinforced Jamo’s love of the DiGiCo desk. “As usual, the console preformed amazing with no issues at all. I do love the uses of delay times on the outputs as I delayed the FOH mix to radio and added Sirius’ 2 audience mics. There was an additional Profile at FOH for Skynyrd and even with the external word clock the SD8 just smoked it. I hear their engineer is now going to try the DiGiCo after hearing our show, which just destroyed his profile sonic-wise and left it sounding limp and weak! There was none of the low-mids or shimmering highs with the Profile. He ran a mic through my desk and was stunned just at the vast improvement to his voice compared to the Avid… ‘Nuff said. Not to mention, the Sirius radio guys said that it was the best sounding live performance to air over Sirius.”

Compact Manhattan Pub Gets Big Sound with Renkus-Heinz

New York, NY – December 2011… The Pig ‘n’ Whistle in midtown Manhattan is typical of many of the area’s taverns. What the narrow storefront space lacks in width, it more than makes up for in depth and height, spanning two floors and extending far to the back of the building it occupies.

“It’s only about 25 feet wide, but it’s more than 75 feet deep, and there’s an open veranda and dining area upstairs, with a high open ceiling,” says Rich Trombitas of Cornwall-based Cardone Solomon & Associates Inc.

“It’s a beautiful place,” says Trombitas. “The architecture is just stunning, the finish and detail looks wonderful. But sonically it’s very challenging. The stage is located on the second level, and particularly on Friday and Saturday nights when they have Irish bands and DJs in there, the noise level can be a real challenge.”

The main floor is served by three wall-mounted TRX82 two-way cabinets per side, with low frequency coverage augmented by a PNX212 subwoofer mounted in a closet, as well as an SGX-12S sub concealed at the end of a banquet seating area. The second level veranda and dining area is covered by six SGX61 compact two-way boxes, with a second SGX12S sub. The system was installed by Rego Park, NY-based Starview Satellite.

The system design was further complicated by architectural changes during the construction phase that limited the number of viable locations for speaker mounting. “We were originally going to go with six TRX81 cabinets per side, but we replaced them with three of the TRX82s,” says Trombitas. “It’s a longer cabinet, with two 8-inch woofers. They turned out to be perfect for the application, because you’ve got 120 degree coverage that’s uniform throughout the entire listening area. You can walk all the way from the front to the back and the coverage is nice and even.”

Despite the architectural challenges, Trombitas says the end result was a great success. “The owners love the system,” he says. “They’re getting good quality background music during the day, and high-impact performance with great vocal sound at night for DJs and live shows. It sounds great on both floors, with no feedback issues.”

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Greater Beth-El Temple Renovates with Iconyx IC Live

Omaha, NE – December 2011… The restoration of Omaha’s Greater Beth-El Temple is complete after a June 2008 arson fire set by mischievous neighborhood youths that nearly destroyed the Apostolic Christian church, popular among Omaha’s African-American community. The congregation was forced to relocate while the temple underwent a complete renovation. Left virtually an empty shell after the fire, the building required new floors, a ceiling, a stage, seating, and numerous other necessities including a sound system.

Greater Beth-El services include a full musical ensemble playing contemporary Christian and gospel music. Theatrical performances and concerts are also regular events at the temple. According to John Manhart of Direct Pro Audio LLC, the contractor who designed and installed Greater Beth-El’s new audio system, low profile looks combined with large sound capability were paramount in selecting the new system.

“Greater Beth-El needs a sound system that blends well aesthetically with the temple’s décor but still provides enough output to handle their sound requirements,” explains Manhart. “They want to avoid big hanging speaker boxes that might block the view of their stage backdrop and projection screen.”

Direct Pro Audio opted to install an Iconyx IC Live Digitally Steerable Array System by Renkus-Heinz. IC Live’s slim profile and customized color make it virtually disappear into the wall, a major factor in its selection.

The installed system includes two ICL-FR-DUAL loudspeakers, each with 16 drivers per side. The loudspeakers have been custom-painted to blend almost seamlessly into the temple’s stage area and are mounted permanently on both walls flanking the stage. Two IC Live sub-woofers are tucked into a nook just below the speakers.

Other system components include a Roland M-300 digital mixing console and a variety of Audix wired and wireless mics.

The renovated temple has seating for approximately 600, but a moveable air wall located in the rear of the temple allows them to accommodate up to 800 people when necessary.

Reports Manhart, “The IC Llive system is low profile, custom painted to match the décor, and has great quality sound output. Nothing else on the market can really do that.”

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Community Expands Distributed Design Family with Pendant Loudspeaker

Chester, PA – December 2011….Community Professional Loudspeakers  has introduced the newest addition to their highly acclaimed Distributed Design Series of ceiling and surface mount loudspeakers.

Featuring identical componentry to the D6 ceiling model, the DP6 pendant loudspeaker offers the superior sound quality, exceptional intelligibility and unparalleled performance that has quickly established the Distributed Design Series as a favorite among installed sound professionals.

A true coaxial loudspeaker with an HF compression driver, the DP6 offers Community’s patented Carbon Ring Cone Technology™ and Tru-Phase™ high-frequency waveguide for consistent, wide dispersion up to 16 kHz. Uniform voicing allows the entire range of Distributed Design ceiling, surface and pendant mount loudspeakers to be combined in a single installation with no compromise of consistency from zone to zone.

The DP6 is equipped with a built-in autoformer, allowing the loudspeaker’s full output and performance to be realized with 70V or 100V distribution lines. An easily accessible selector switch on the face of the loudspeaker makes it simple to choose between 8 ohm or 70V/100V operation, while the integrated rear cover conceals wiring and hanging hardware for a clean, aesthetically pleasing installation. Two 15-foot high tensile galvanized steel wire rope suspension cables with integrated spring clips are included.

Available in standard black and white finishes, the Distributed Design DP6′s contoured, contemporary pendant form factor is ideal for restaurants, bars, hotels, ballrooms, casinos, retail and commercial establishments, meeting rooms, convention centers and any other open architecture environments.

For more information, visit www.communitypro.com

 

 

Yamaha LS9 Digital Console Breathes New Life into The Living Christmas Tree

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Living Christmas Tree at Grace Bible Church in Oxnard, California recently added a Yamaha LS9-32 digital audio console to enhance its six annual performances. The church, built in 1970, began The Living Christmas Tree program in 1973. Housed in a tree-like structure designed and built by several church members, the set can hold over 70 singers.

The sanctuary was modified to accommodate 48 1,000-watt Leko theatrical lighting fixtures, two follow spots, associated dimmers, and a 24” mirror ball. Sadly, the modifications didn’t include permanently installed audio, so for The Living Tree and other special theater events, a large portable sound system was brought in. The earlier productions were accompanied by musicians with some very elaborate stage sets that included a ski slope, toboggan run, and ice rink. In 2003, the original “Tree” structure was replaced by a new commercially built structure that was easier to assemble and more convenient for the singers to climb into.

“Changing times meant that we had to handle production differently than in the past,” states Alan Hatmaker, Chairman of the Elder Board and lead audio tech. “For instance, with an all-volunteer production team, we cut costs and production complications by moving from a live orchestra to professional backup tracks.” Since Grace Bible Church is a small 100-member church, they opened up the cast to members of other churches in the area. This year, the member cast of over 60 singers is made up of members from 14 churches.

“Instead of purchasing tickets, we ask the audience to bring cans of food for Ventura County (CA) Food Share,” says Hatmaker. “For the last nine years, the audiences have given over 20,000 pounds of food (3,000 pounds last year alone), and enough offerings to keep the program going. We also asked the local Rescue Mission to provide support for help set up and dismantling of the Tree structure and portable staging.”

Hatmaker designed a sound system back in 1981 that consisted of a large portable system built around a Yamaha MQ Series console. “We chose the MQ for its many professional features and overall quality. In 1991, the church decided to upgrade the installed sound system. The centerpiece of the system was a Yamaha PM1200-32 console. Since the PM1200 was an “entry level” pro series console, it gave us great value with its high-quality construction (weighing in at around 150 pounds) and great features. The PM1200 served us well for the past 20+ years until this year when it was replaced by the Yamaha LS9-32. We chose the LS9 since it, like the PM1200, is an “entry level”, high-quality Yamaha professional series console, that will provide us the same long-term service we had with the PM1200.”

Hatmaker said that one of the biggest features of the Yamaha LS9 for his purpose is the console’s built-in effects, ‘more than I could have ever imagined.’ “This feature alone allows us to remove five pieces of outboard gear between the console and amplifiers, resulting in higher reliability of our overall system. The LS9 is great for going from “Tree” setup to Sunday service setup. We use the Scene function to “toggle” between the two set-ups.” He also sights compressors, available for each channel, as another feature the audio team appreciates. Hatmaker noted that he received a few of hours of initial training on the Yamaha console and trains all of the volunteer audio operators.

Times and consoles have certainly evolved. “With the PM1200, I had to write down all of the channel settings for the Tree so I could return to them after the Sunday service!”

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. The company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker products. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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