A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive of the InfoComm Newslink Category

LECTROSONICS TM400 DEPLOYED AT CHURCHILL DOWNS FOR WIRELESS TEST & MEASUREMENT

**** Photo: David Marsh ****

Louisville, KY – August, 2014… Churchill Downs, the thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the annual Kentucky Derby, represents the epitome of professional horse racing. In preparation for the 140th running of the Kentucky Oaks and Kentucky Derby, facility management wanted a new sound reinforcement system installed covering all outdoor areas of the facility. To ensure the new system met the highest expectations, the design services of Dallas, TX-based Marsh/PMK International, LLC were retained. And to assist with the many considerations that go into the commissioning of a new sound system, a TM400 Wireless System for Test and Measurement from Rio Rancho, NM-based Lectrosonics was utilized. more

LA MARINA NYC’S OUTDOOR EVENTS THRIVE WITH D.A.S. AUDIO

**** Photo: Edwin Diaz at La Marina NYC ****

New York, NY – August 2014… Located at Dyckman Marina in upper Manhattan, the newly rebuilt La Marina NYC sports a restaurant, bar, lounge, and events space that covers more than 75,000 square feet of Hudson River waterfront. With world-class facilities and a breathtaking waterfront view, it is rapidly becoming the place to see and be seen. La Marina NYC’s waterfront area is where all the high profile live activity takes place and, to ensure a high level of speech intelligibility and music reproduction for all their events, the venue’s management recently took delivery of a new sound reinforcement system drawn from the WR Series catalog of Valencia, Spain-based D.A.S. Audio. more

FSR’s New LITE-IT Enclosed Box Light Named Winner In rAVe’s 2014 Annual Best of InfoComm Awards

Woodland Park, NJ – FSR is proud to announce that its LITE-IT Enclosure Box Light, introduced at this year’s InfoComm 2014 show in Las Vegas, has been named a winner by rAVe [Publications] in its 2014 Annual Best of InfoComm Awards in the category of “Best New AV Accessory.” Winners were revealed following the show, which reports a record high of 37,000-plus attendees from more than 114 countries. After scouring more than 490,000 net square feet of space and visiting with the 947 exhibitors showing new products and technologies, the rAVe team carefully chose the products that they thought were the best and most innovative.

FSR’s new LITE-IT easily provides lighting in floor, wall and ceiling boxes, or anywhere a work light is needed. This little light securely fastens to any ferrous metal surface via a “rare earth” magnetic mounting. A timed circuit automatically turns LITE-IT off after 75 seconds, and its anti-retrigger circuit prevents it from staying on even if the switch is held continuously.

“FSR is proud that our new LITE-IT Enclosure Box Light has not only received a very warm reception from show attendees at this year’s InfoComm show, but that it also gained the attention of the staff from rAVe and won its 2014 Annual Best of InfoComm Award,” said Jan Sandri, FSR president. “While looking to address the needs of our many users in markets ranging from education and houses of worship to corporate and medical, FSR wanted to design a unit that would deliver the same level of outstanding performance for which we are known.”

LITE-IT’s warm 3000K LED color for eye comfort provides over 12 Lumens of light output (20 percent more than a standard PR-2 flashlight bulb), and its super-efficient wide angle dual LED’s furnish a lighting pattern with uniform brightness to very end of battery life. High-quality alkaline batteries are included and pre-installed and provide 4+ years of typical usage from a single pair of batteries (Based on 2 operations per day, 5 days per week, 52 weeks per year).

rAVe [Publications], founded in 1998 by Gary Kayye, is a news organization that provides coverage of the commercial (ProAV) and residential (HomeAV) audiovisual trade industries via e-newsletters, blogs, video, social media, and a variety of other mediums.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of signal management and infrastructure solutions for the audio / video, datacom, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and HDBaseT & CAT-X signal delivery solutions.

The company is an Energy Star Partner and complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to demonstrate its deep commitment to preserving the planet. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information: www.fsrinc.com.

FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Public Relations & Advertising
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • mailto:harriet@desertmoon.tv

Southwestern Assembly of God U Installs Yamaha NUAGE DAW System

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Located in Waxahachie, TX, Southwestern Assemblies of God University (SAGU) began as a regional bible school and later, added a junior college program. The university has experienced phenomenal enrollment increases from 596 students in 1991 to approximately 2,200 today. In 2013, the academic divisions of the university realigned into three colleges: the College of Bible & Church Ministries, the College of Business and Education, and the College of Music and Communication Arts. All colleges maintain Bible-based curriculum to fulfill the mission of SAGU. Since 2000, SAGU has added 24 new academic programs, bringing the total to more than 60 programs.

Recently, SAGU added a 48-Fader Yamaha NUAGE Advanced Production DAW System, purchased through Audio DAWG of Irving, Texas. The system is installed in a dedicated studio for commercial production that is available for rental and an academic learning lab for Digital Media Arts students. Internships are being offered for students in the program, but they will also have to complete at least one major audio project using the studio, with staff engineer assistance.

“I started using Nuendo 2.0 in 2003 as an upgrade from Cubase SX which I was strictly using for MIDI programming, states John Cookman, Chief Engineer and Director of Media Services and Production. My DAW at the time was a PARIS system that had been discontinued, and I needed a DAW that could keep up with where I was leaving off. Wow! Nuendo really did that and more.”

Cookman purchased NUAGE primarily because he had grown tired of recording/editing/mixing with a mouse and keyboard. “I always sensed that my creativity was being stifled due to the inefficient ways of keyboard and mouse work flow, Cookman says. I had originally planned to purchase a Euphonix system because of its acclaimed integration with Nuendo, but once I demoed the NUAGE at NAB 2013, I decided it was much more practical to buy a console that was specifically made for the Nuendo platform and would also be supported by Nuendo’s parent company, Yamaha. From the first minute I sat down with the NUAGE, I have felt at home.”

The Digital Media Arts BA degree is the path for all of SAGU media students, and the department is moving toward an audio recording degree path. They do offer an audio recording class that is mandatory for all DMA students. Each student will be doing at least one project on the NUAGE. SAGU averages roughly 20 students in the audio recording class per semester.

Technically, SAGU is not a house of worship but they do have daily chapel services. “My department has started up a live and on-demand outlet to view and listen to services (www.SAGU.tv chapel channel), notes Cookman. This is a multi-camera and multi channel audio mix for broadcast TV using our DMA students as student workers. We also do sports broadcasting as well.”

Two main facilities are used for broadcasting, the largest auditorium seats approximately 2,300. During the school year the auditorium is occupied mostly by students. The other auditorium is a new performing arts theater seating 625. “Our NUAGE system is directly integrated to this room so that we can use it as a sound stage to record from,” adds Cookman.

Cookman appreciates the NUAGE state-of-the-art approach adding in the elements of the analog workflow to a digital non-linear workflow. “Now I am able to access the best of both worlds concerning work flow. Yamaha has done an outstanding job at connecting the user to efficient workflow systems. The way they have integrated NUAGE with the DAW (especially Nuendo) has empowered the engineer with hands-on tools that are unprecedented in our industry.”

Specific features that were attractive in SAGU’s decision process were the motorized faders, one-touch navigation to any parameter, and the ability to edit each parameter microscopically with professional grade encoders. “Faders and buttons impact our work environment everyday. Being able to reach over and instantly access channel data makes workflow so efficient. Now, I don’t have to spend time scrolling with my mouse and keyboard keeping me from really getting into that creative zone. The NUAGE is a “Must Have” for every DAW.”

John Cookman has been in the industry for 30 years, and 18 of those were spent in the non-linear DAW world. “Since I started working with NUAGE, I finally feel like I am tapping into the top layer of my potential as a engineer and producer. In May, we released a Christian music project for an outside artist (I was hired to produce and record/edit/mix). Within 45 days, we charted at #10 on the Billboard Hot Christian charts and the next week, we topped out at #8. The artist was the only independent artist in the top 100 at that time. I attribute a lot of that to the flexibility the NUAGE brought us to use more of our creative brain rather than engineering brain.”

Cookman says he is budgeting for a smaller NUAGE setup for broadcast remix in SAGU’s master control room currently using Nuendo.

For more information on SAGU, visit www.sagu.edu.

For more information on Audio DAWg, visit www.audiodawg.com.

For more information on NUAGE, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

PICTURED: John Cookman

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the sound reinforcement, touring, broadcast, commercial recording, and post-production markets with a complete line of digital mixers, amplifiers, speakers, processors, networking capabilities, and NUAGE Advanced Production DAW System. YCAS is also the official North American distributor for NEXO speaker products. With the new CIS Series that includes ceiling and surface mount speakers, mixer and power amplifiers, and matrix processors, the Company furthers is commitment to their commercial installation solutions customers. All market sectors receive comprehensive in-house/field product training, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

You Say You Want More Resolution – Renault’s CAVE Raises the Bar for Virtual Reality Design

Paris, France – August 2014…Virtual Reality (VR) technology first appeared on the virtual horizon several decades ago, but it’s safe to say that the past few years have seen a quantum leap in its evolution. With ever-increasing processing power and ultra-high resolution display technologies, the cartoon-ish, low bitrate virtual worlds of yesterday have given way to stunningly realistic environments shockingly close to the real thing. And VR technology has become an integral aspect of so many of our most prolific industries, from military and pilot training, architecture, and medical research, to aerospace and automobile design.

French automobile manufacturer Renault has long been ahead of the curve in embracing new technologies. Most recently, the company has implemented a new CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) facility at the Paris headquarters. While other auto manufacturers have also implemented CAVE technology, Renault’s facility boasts the highest resolution ever realized in a VR environment, with five sides of Sony-based imaging that can deliver up to 16k resolution.

Renault partnered with Mechdyne, a leader in VR and visual technologies, to design and implement the new CAVE facility. “Renault approached us to bid on the project, because we had already built a six-sided CAVE of that resolution, and we understood the challenges,” explains Mechdyne’s Richard Cashmore. “They had a very clear concept of what they wanted to do.”

“We wanted to work with a company who could provide us with a holistic, integrated system, including structure, projection, and computers,” explains Andras Kemeny, founder and head of Renault’s Virtual Reality and Immersive Simulation Technologies Group. “While many of the leading manufacturers have provided exceptionally good support and advice, we found that Mechdyne was not bound to a specific technology. They were able to look at the entire technological landscape, and consider combinations of different brands and products. Their approach was very focused on our specific goals, rather than on whatever technology they favored.”

The system includes five sides of Sony SXRD 4k projectors at 5.5k lumens, scalable to 16k — the first 16k VR environment anywhere in the world. “While there were some other options using newer DLP projection, ultimately, the Sony system delivered the fastest performance and the highest resolution, both of which were critical factors,” observes Cashmore.

Kemeny adds, “In this case, the Sony projector Mechdyne specified was originally designed for cinema-based solutions. Calibrating multiple projectors was not something Sony had addressed. Sony provided us some data, and then our engineers at Renault and Mechdyne collaborated for several months to design a calibration protocol. We’ve been quite happy with the results.”

Indeed, the collaboration between Renault and Mechdyne created a powerful synergy. “Originally, the relationship was that of client and provider, but over time it really evolved to where we were all really part of the same team,” says Kemeny.

“I think that’s one thing that’s unique about our approach,” observes Cashmore. “We really try and look at the project through the eyes of the end user. We’re not trying to sell whatever technology we’ve got in stock. We can recommend what we feel is best for them, given their goals and the technologies available.”

Though Renault’s CAVE was initially created for interior ergonomic design, Kemeny reports that the technology has become popular with other departments within the organization.

“One thing that was very exciting for us was the fact that the CAVE was being embraced by various departments within Renault,” he says. “Ultimately, this is enabling us to build a better vehicle.”

In fact, the Renault CAVE has led to discussions with Daimler (parent company of Mercedes Benz) on a new collaborative project. “There has long been a strong working relationship between Renault and Daimler,” says Kemeny.

“The collaboration with Mechdyne has given us the most state-of-the-art facility in the automotive industry,” Kemeny concludes. “It’s a system we can be very proud of.”

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About Mechdyne 
Mechdyne is one of the world’s leading providers of innovative visual information technologies.  We bend technology to our will in ways that transform complex data into insights and ideas.  To ensure our customers succeed, we provide comprehensive, customized solutions that include consulting, software, technical services, and hardware integration.
With offices around the world, Mechdyne serves a global customer base.  Our customers include: leading government laboratories, energy companies, universities, manufacturing and design firms, U.S. armed forces, and other users of visual information technologies.

HOSANNA LUTHERAN CHURCH GOES HI-FI WITH DANLEY

MANKATO, MINNESOTA – AUGUST 2014: Growing with the community since its founding in 1972, Hosanna Lutheran Church is now a cornerstone of religious life in Mankato, Minnesota. With four contemporary services a week, plus one traditional service and plenty of high-SPL youth events, its sanctuary sound and video systems were tapped to provide a huge range of content. Despite having loudspeakers made by a respected manufacturer, intelligibility and low-end extension were poor and a regular source of complaints until recently, when Audio Video Electronics (AVE) (Maple Grove, Minnesota) renovated the system. Citing their excellent fidelity and intelligibility, AVE installed a pair of Danley Sound Labs SH-60 loudspeakers. To give Hosanna Lutheran Church plenty of bass when needed, AVE also gave the church a beefy Danley DBH-218 subwoofer.

“Before AVE’s renovation, we always had complaints,” said Matt Kotthoff, technical director at Hosanna. “The system was muddy, and a lot of our disciples, especially some of the senior members, had a hard time understanding what was being said depending on where they were sitting. Also the system lacked intelligibility and power.” Stefan Svärd, president of AVE, added, “Not only that, the low-frequency extension was simply missing. This was despite its big name components and the fact that it looked like a good system on paper. It simply didn’t translate to real-world performance.”

Svärd designed an elegantly simple new sound reinforcement system for Hosanna. An exploded mono cluster of two Danley SH-60s leverages Danley’s excellent pattern control to cover all of the seating without energizing the rest of the structure. Between them, also on the ceiling, is the Danley DBH-218 subwoofer. Svärd repurposed Lab.gruppen C-series amplifiers for the mains and added a Lab.gruppen FB14000 for the subwoofer. An existing Biamp Nexia and EV-DC1 processor condition the system, albeit less now than with the previous components, as the Danley boxes are naturally flat and transparent. A new Midas Pro 3 mixer gives Kotthoff and his techs control of the system for complex services, and a Crestron control system provides simple control of audio, video, lighting, and HVAC via iPad or iPhone. Finally, a new 8000lumen Digital Projection HD projector gives the congregation crisp imagery.

“I’ve had a lot of experience with loudspeakers from all sorts of manufacturers,” said Svärd. “To me, Danley’s unique designs offer the smoothest, most ‘studio-monitor-like’ performance in the sound reinforcement market. They have accurate phase response, great pattern control, and true hi-fi sound. The Danley DBH-218 subwoofer delivers a lot of clean output, and because it’s horn-loaded, it affords a degree of pattern control. For the youth services, they have that subwoofer shaking the whole building! Together, the whole system sounds phenomenal.”

Kotthoff agrees, “The Danleys sound great! Everything sounds crisp, clear, and clean. Nothing sounds harsh or painful. The intelligibility in the whole worship space is outstanding, everything from feeling the bass guitar rhythm to the clear natural sound of both singing and speaking voices. The DBH-218 subwoofer is awesome, every chance I get I love to crank the kick drum and feel the beat go right through me! I have received so many compliments, from ‘the audio is so clear’ and ‘now that’s an HD presentation’ to things like ‘I got bass in my butt!’ and ‘can you turn it louder?’ The system is amazing! It totally enhances Hosanna Lutheran’s strong music ministry in so many ways!!”

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

JOEL HAMILTON RECORDS & MIXES “PUSS N BOOTS” DEBUT USING ATC SCM25A’s

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – AUGUST 2014: Puss n Boots is a three-piece, all-female, alt-country band led by singer-songwriter Norah Jones and backed by accomplished vocalists Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper. All three women learned new instruments for five years before recording their debut album with engineer/musician/producer Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Black Keys, Sparklehorse, Elvis Costello) at Studio G Brooklyn. Titled No Fools, No Fun, the album was recently released on Blue Note Records. As co-owner of Studio G Brooklyn with Tony Maimone, Hamilton installed ATC SCM25A three-way reference monitors and ATC SCM0.1-15 subwoofers in Studio A, a change that happily coincided with his first Grammy nomination (Pretty Lights, A Color Map of the Sun), a Latin Grammy nomination (Bomba Estereo, Elegancia Tropical), and a Latin Grammy win (Gaby Moreno, Postales). The ATCs were purchased from Audio Power Tools in New York.

“The ATCs have changed the way I work and improved the quality of my work,” said Hamilton. “I’m lucky to have a nicely tuned control room with an SSL and plenty of vintage outboard gear, and with the ATCs, I’m suddenly able to make decisions that are smaller – and yet more critical – than I have ever been able to make before. I have the ability to resolve a finer shade of the colors I’m hurling at the end-listener, and it’s been a revelation. It’s not a small thing, and that’s why I’m reaching for dramatic words like that. It’s tectonic. The entire continent has shifted.”

The glorious harmonies delivered by Jones, Dobson and Popper are a huge part of Puss n Boots’ magic. They form the emotional foreground. “The balance of those harmonies is crucial,” said Hamilton. “You’ve got these three gorgeous women with gorgeous voices, and they’re all coming at you like gangbusters because they can all project. We recorded everything live to analog tape, including the vocals. That gives a particular nuance to how the instruments sit against the vocals. You can feel the beat push and pull so beautifully. I needed to make sure that all of that nuance would come shining through for the listener. Striking the right midrange balance of those harmonies is critical, and I had to make sure all of that beauty would be immediately apparent to, say, my mom!”

While Norah Jones’ existing albums might safely be described as “polished” and most classic country albums might safely be described as “rough,” Hamilton had to walk the line between those extremes. “The balance is deliberately raw, which is perhaps unexpected by traditional Norah Jones standards, but it also has to be informed,” he said. “We were shooting for a tiny bulls eye, but we also had to make sure that everything felt unfettered and natural; just on the edge of scratchy so that it felt rough but didn’t actually hurt people. With the ATCs, I could find that line and make adjustments with confidence. I could tell where I was overcooking it on purpose. I could dial in just the right amount of ‘road house.’”

With the introduction of the ATCs, gone too is the need to translate for the client how a mix will sound outside of the studio. “After spending a lot of time in front of other monitors, I could tell when certain things would sound bad in the studio but fine outside of the studio,” Hamilton said. “The challenge beyond that, however, was convincing the client that those bad things would be fine later on, which is just one more thing to heap onto the already-skittish nature of an attended mix session. And so clients would ask, ‘why don’t you just get monitors that sound like it will sound like?’ It seems so simple, but of course it’s not.”

Hamilton used to switch between a number of monitors and loudspeakers all day long, but now he just hangs out on the ATCs. Depending on the task at hand, he can turn the ATC subwoofer on or not. “With the sub on and the volume cracked, the ATCs rock and serve as ‘mains,’” he said. “When I’m listening closely and resolving small moves, the ATCs are my nearfields. Either way, I now have complete confidence in what I’m hearing and doing. When a mix sounds good on the ATCs, I know it will sound good everywhere else. With Puss n Boots, we were able to make solid decisions that stuck. We totally avoided the hell of endless revisions!”

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.

www.transaudiogroup.com

METRIC HALO GEAR NO MYTH FOR FOH ENGINEER SUNE SNELLMAN JAKOBSEN

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK – AUGUST 2014: Sune Snellman Jakobsen is a live mix engineer stationed in Copenhagen, Denmark whose credits include world tours with The Raveonettes, Mew, Mercury Rev from NY, Kashmir from Denmark, and, most recently, Trentemøller. An avid Metric Halo user, Jakobsen owns a ULN-8 interface and a LIO-8 interface and regularly uses their SpectraFoo sound analysis software to set up shows and to help identify and solve problems while mixing. His interfaces carry Metric Halo’s optional +DSP, which allows him to run their powerful plug-ins on critical live channels (including the whole mix!).

Jakobsen’s entry into the industry was not so worldly, nor so high-tech, but it set him on the right path. “I became interested in audio as a member of the underground punk scene in Copenhagen during my teenage years,” he said. “I played guitar in punk bands and hung out in a punk club where some older guys taught me the basics of mixing consoles, multi-way speaker systems, stage monitors, and all that. Neither the bands nor the audience cared too much about fidelity or clarity, so I could mix shows night-after-night and no one complained about my dreadful mixes. It was hard on the ears but good practice for a novice.”

One of Jakobsen’s punk rock mentors recommended him for a job with one of Denmark’s leading PA companies, and he spent the next several years prepping outboard racks, packing house-boxes for rentals, driving trucks, rigging PAs, and patching microphones on tours and festival stages. “The whole time I was looking over the shoulders of all the experienced and skilled monitor and FOH engineers,” he said. “I soon moved from rigging and miking to actually operating the boards, which was exciting. I got pretty good at mixing monitors, and I was able to mix FOH for a few up-and-coming acts.”

As his skills and industry contacts grew, more bands hired Jakobsen to engineer their shows, prompting him to make the move to full-time freelance. After some years of regional touring with local bands, he signed on to a worldwide tour with The Raveonettes. “The band had just landed a major label deal and had a lot of hype going so we went back and forth from European to U.S. club tours and festivals,” he said. “We performed on the Late Show with David Letterman a few times, Conan, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, numerous radio sessions, and support-tours with Depeche Mode, Interpol, The Strokes, Supergrass and many others. Those support tours were great because they gave me new opportunities to learn from great live engineers.” When The Raveonettes finally took a break after six years of constant touring, Jakobsen signed on with Mew and, later, Trentemøller.

“As a FOH engineer, I think it’s important to embrace the sonic ideals of the artist,” Jakobsen said. “I don’t see any point in applying my own favorite flavor if it doesn’t appeal to the artist. Along those lines, it’s critical to build a relationship of trust so the artist feels I have an understanding and appreciation of what their music should sound like. It was an interesting transition to go from The Raveonettes’ minimal, noisy, and reverb-y soundscape to Mew’s big sonic universe, with big pounding drums and layers of pads, guitars, and backing vocals.” Although still working with Mew, Jakobsen began touring with Trentemøller in 2010, which took him to European arenas in support of Depeche Mode, 3,000-seat headlining gigs, and plenty of European festivals. “I’m still fascinated by the way a good mix can lift a music experience (and how a bad mix can ruin a show), and I’m still intrigued by how difficult it is to reinforce audio and to mix,” he said. “I like the combination of creativity, technical skills, and science. It’s an ongoing learning experience, and that’s cool.”

SETTING UP THE SHOW
Jakobsen seldom has more than a short window to load in, set up, check the PA, and sound check before doors open. One of the first things he addresses is the PA system performance: “The frequency response should be full range and both level and response should be as uniform as possible throughout the audience area. I use Metric Halo SpectraFoo sound analysis software on most every gig to analyze and help tune the PA system.” He typically sends pink noise to one side of the PA, feeds the same signal to SpectraFoo’s Transfer Function source channel, places his Earthworks M30 measuring mic somewhere on-axis, and feeds its output to the Transfer Function response channel. He then time aligns the two signals with SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder and takes a snapshot of the response. He repeats this process with the mic at several other locations – a little farther or closer, and on or off axis. He marks the snapshots in SpectraFoo’s overlay list and asks it to calculate an average.

“That,” he said, “is then my visual reading of the system. I immediately get an idea of the PA at hand and whether it’s reasonably linear or not. Sometimes I’ll spot an issue even before I listen to music. For example if there’s a broad dip in the 1k-6k range it could indicate the gain settings in the system crossover aren’t right and the hi-mid drivers are gained too low. Or a dip at the crossover frequency of the sub and the low-mid could indicate phase or timing issues with the subs. It’s of course important to listen to reference music and tune with the ears in addition to the SpectraFoo output, but the visual plot is a great help in locating problem frequencies.” He uses SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder along with the phase response of the Transfer Function to time-align subwoofers, fills, and delay speakers if necessary. During sound check, he uses its Correlation Meter and Phase Torch to verify phasing between sources (e.g. bass DI and bass mic). Ringing the system with Spectragraph allows him to quickly identify and notch out problem frequencies with the Metric Halo EQ plug-in.

MIXING THE SHOW
Jakobsen described his mix philosophy: “The mix itself must complement the music and should hopefully impress and overwhelm the audience. All of the instruments should be well-defined within the mix. Vocals should almost always be on top of the mix, and lyrics should be audible. I tend to favor ‘wall of sound’ mixes, with gaps in the soundscape filled by anything available from stage, perhaps by mixing guitar parts up very close to the vocal or adding lush reverb to drums or percussion. I like to be overwhelmed by sound when I’m in the audience, so I aim to do the same when I’m mixing. I think one key to an interesting mix is to feature supporting roles as much as lead roles, be it a rhythm guitar or a tambourine or whatever; I think it helps keep people’s attention when all the different roles are well defined.”

Jakobsen uses his Metric Halo ULN-8 and LIO-8 along with the free Metric Halo MIO Console control software as an audio “multi-tool.” MIO Console allows him to route signals and to operate the DSP resources he has installed on the interfaces. With Trentemøller, he reserves the Metric Halo gear for the tracks that need the most processing: vocals, kick drum and snare drum. “I’m not aware of any other interface that has the combination of such great-sounding preamps, transparent converters, sublime mix bus processing, and all of the DSP tools necessary: unlimited bands of precise EQs, compression, limiting, delay, and ‘character’ modeling. At the same time, it gives me a straightforward interface for recording and playback.”

For vocals, Jakobsen uses Metric Halo’s “Classic British Mic Pre” character, followed by a “MIOstrip” loaded with a six-band EQ for sweetening, two compressors with complementary fast and slow settings, a second six-band EQ for notching out problem frequencies, and a very fast compressor with a side chain high-passed at 5kHz to serve as a de-esser. “In addition, I use the ‘California Vocal Box’ character on the vocal’s master strip, which I find adds a nice grainy texture,” he said. “For the current tour, Trentemøller asked for a vocal distortion for a few songs. I made a virtual MIO channel and tried different combinations of the Pedal and Amp macros. I ended up with a combination of the ‘Screamer’ into the ‘MHClean’ with some delay and a lot of compression and EQ. It sounds great!”

Jakobsen uses similar processing for the kick and snare drum. ” I almost always mix drums into a group and insert a stereo ULN-8 or LIO-8 input, split that into two stereo channel strips in MIO Console – one with no processing (or perhaps just Metric Halo’s Transient Designer) and one with a hard squashing compressor, Transient Designer, and often a bit of soft clip to give the drums an edgy character,” he said. “Those channels sum to a stereo output that’s a killer parallel compression drum group insert. I even have the option to add different characters to the drum group, for example the ‘Soft-Saturation’ character for a fatter and more punchy sound, and I have an EQ on the output bus that allows me to cut boomy frequencies in the low end or add high-end brilliance on the fly.”

Finally, Jakobsen sends the entire mix into a stereo MIO Console channel that gets routed to two auxiliary groups, one with “SoftSat” Character applied and one without. “I can then mix between these two depending on the PA system of the day,” he said. “It’s like having a wet/dry control on the SoftSat Character, which can really make the PA system sound like it’s ‘in your face.’ Then I route that mix to multiple master busses with different EQs and delays for the main PA, the subs, fills, and delays.” During the performance, Jakobsen keeps SpectraFoo open with a Level Meter on the house sound, a Spectragram and a Spectragraph on the mix bus, and a Spectragraph on the solo bus for quickly diagnosing problems with individual channels. “It’s especially helpful for getting the low-end even. If I hear a boomy note in the bass, it’s easy to identify with SpectraFoo,” he concluded.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

Florida Baptist Church Converts (A/D) with Symetrix

OCALA, FLORIDA – AUGUST 2014: The sound system at Trinity Baptist Church in Ocala, Florida is quite sophisticated for a sanctuary that seats approximately 800 congregants. It delivers left-center-right imaging to nearly every seat from multiple loudspeaker positions, including six time-delayed left-center-right zones that cover the areas farthest from the pulpit. This system was installed by Pro Sound & Video in 2004 and although the loudspeakers and amplifiers have held up well, the original DSP processing system that performed the complex routing and filtering did not. Florida-based Pro Sound & Video, Inc. replaced the original processing system with two Symetrix Radius 12×8 Dante™ network audio DSPs and augmented their sixteen combined outputs with two SymNet xOut 12 audio output expansion boxes. All of the units network seamlessly via Dante and replace all of the old analog processing, with plenty of processing power to spare for improvements.

“The system at Trinity Baptist is really nice with almost every seat getting a left-center-right experience,” said Michael Frazee, project manager with Pro Sound & Video. “However, the old processing system was based on a system of five digital processors that were cross wired with analog and AES patches to share various signals between the processors. This worked well for a long time, but one of the main processors went bad, and since the original components are out of production, it became clear that a new system would be required. To say the least, the Symetrix new generation of open architecture, Dante networking processors would afford us a considerable amount of signal handling flexibility to handle the complex processing tasks required for the multi-zone LCR system.”

The required processing includes equalization, distribution, and crossovers for the various speaker zones, which are comprised of the main house system, distributed LCR systems, stage monitors, and additional recording and general distribution mixes. Two Radius 12×8 DSP and two xOut 12 audio output expansion units form one integrated processing network via Dante with 24 inputs and 40 outputs. Programming the system, despite its complexity, was straightforward using Symetrix’ Composer software. “Circumstances in this case necessitated my involvement at the programming level. The Composer software was very predictable, but when I ran into a few snags, I contacted the tech staff at Symetrix, and they were very helpful in resolving programming issues.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

WIND OVER THE EARTH ADDS AN API 1608 TO ITS DEMO ROOM STUDIO

BOULDER, COLORADO – AUGUST 2014: Situated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Wind Over the Earth (WOTE) offers recording sessions for local bands, singer/songwriters, and voice-overs, as well as post-production and training services within its demo studios. It doesn’t promote itself as a commercial studio, but rather uses its space as a base of knowledge to be shared with the community. As a longtime user of API gear, WOTE has now commissioned an in-house 1608 console to offer real world knowledge and applications to its customers.

“Jumping into the 1608 is something we wanted to do for quite some time,” stated Mark Venezia, studio manager at WOTE. “The classic sound of API is something WOTE has been advocating for years, so when we were making the decision to install a console, the 1608 was the right fit.”

Since the commissioning, the 1608’s headroom, imaging, and overall depth of sound have made an immediate impact. “The 1608 has brought us up to another level of visibility,” shared Venezia. “It has made our life that much easier. The work flow on everything we do is smoother.”

Part of what makes the 1608 a success at WOTE is the setup. “We have everything wired into four bays as of right now, and the ease of use revealed itself in our first session. We custom-build all of our cables here at WOTE, and the last two 1608 consoles we have sold have included custom wiring packages for specific client needs,” explained Venezia. “In each case, customers who have been in our demo room learned first-hand the ease of use. The versatility of moving modules around is nice as well.”

With some post-production projects, recording sessions, and a series of live shows using the 1608 already complete, WOTE is eager to pursue further trainings. “We are putting together a series of master’s mixing seminars, where we will be flying out some high-profile engineers for an evening of knowledge sharing in the mixing environment. We love hosting seminars like this, as community is our number one priority,” shared Venezia. Part of the glue that holds all the future works together is the knowledge WOTE is able to pair with the gear it offers. “The 1608 is the centerpiece of the room, and everything is based around it.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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