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Yamaha Rolling Showroom Training Sessions Set for Newton, Massachusetts


BUENA PARK, Calif.—Yamaha Commercial Audio Training (YCATS) and the Rolling Showroom will be parked in Newton, Massachusetts on November 16 and 17 from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. Scheduled sessions include Yamaha M7CL and LS9 digital audio consoles Tips and Tricks, Introduction to Digital Audio Networks, Multi-Track Recording and Virtual Sound Check with ASIO Streamer, Introduction to DME Designer, and DM1000-VCM Applications and Operation.

Classes are open to all audio professionals and free of charge. Registration deadline is November 13. For more details and to register, visit http://www.yamahacommercialaudiosystems.com/training_class_desc.php?courseID=16.

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THE SYMETRIX SOLUS 8 PROCESSOR SOARS AT THE EAGLES’ LOFT

STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT – OCTOBER 2011: St. John’s Episcopal Church, located in Stamford, was founded by Colonists in 1752. Its present structure erected in 1880, replaces the original destroyed by fire. Its current Rector the Reverend Dr. James Wheeler and Special Projects Coordinator, Bruce Kittredge approved an engineered multimedia A/V system designed by PASCOM of Hamden, Connecticut featuring the new Symetrix Solus for a recently renovated gathering space. Named the Eagles’ Loft, this former basketball court turned state-of-the-art multi-function gathering space, is a major component of this campus’ extensive four million-plus dollar restoration. This meeting facility is named to represent St. John’s parish’s symbol, the Eagle, as well as its soaring architecture. The Eagles’ Loft name also ties nicely to the church’s support of Boy Scout Troup #5 (Connecticut’s second oldest troop). This space’s flexible seating will occupy up to two-hundred persons attending a range of functions that will include: concerts, theatrical productions, lectures, presentations, and full bandwidth HD movies.
Early into the project, one of the building’s contractors was asked about a sound system for the space and gladly agreed to do some research. With a visit to the local branch of a national electronics chain he found the assistance of a salesperson eager to sell him four of their largest, three-way, home, hi-fi, speakers. His strategy was to place one loudspeaker into each of the room’s corners, aimed toward the center. Fortunately this design strategy caught the ear of Bruce Kittredge who put the brakes on this effort and proceeded to do his own investigation.

With the Episcopal Church being the close-knit community that it is, it wasn’t long before a colleague from another Episcopal church in NYC had contacted Bruce suggesting a decidedly more professional solution.

It is here that Peter Scandone, president of PASCOM, entered the story. The recommendation was for a Duran Audio steerable line array, and Duran Audio’s U.S. distributor suggested that Scandone and PASCOM should become involved. “The acoustics of the Eagles’ Loft presented a serious challenge,” he said. “Its hardwood flooring on both the stage and the gathering area, together with a plaster ceiling and walls, while excellent for music, are a detriment to the naturalness and articulation the owners sought for their lecture series.

Although the church initially considered a single source, monophonic system for speech, their aspirations blossomed at the prospect of a truly professional A/V system. Scandone designed and installed a Duran Audio DSX-180 stereo line array with its extended high-end response. Together with a Bose 502B subwoofer powered by a QSC amplifier, the loudspeaker system has more than enough sonic muscle to match the Eiki HD video projection system.

A Symetrix Solus 8 open-architecture signal processor forms the core of St. John’s new audio system. Scandone custom programmed the unit to handle all of the input conditioning, logic routing, and loudspeaker management, relying on its fixed 8-in by 8-out topography to interconnect to the rest of the gear.

Despite the sophistication of the Solus 8′s processing, Scandone was able to present St. John’s with an extremely simplified user interface. Specifically, a Symetrix ARC-K1 wall panel remote provides volume control. “The rest of processing – precisely controlled mixing, dynamics processing, equalization, routing, and signal-alignment – all happen inside this single chassis,” said Scandone. “I am impressed by the Solus 8′s ability to seamlessly manage multi-microphone speech and vocal reinforcement with true clarity and transparency. At the same time, it provides the high-fidelity reproduction of prerecorded sources that include the demanding soundtracks of HD-Blu-ray(tm) discs.

Perhaps most importantly, the Symetrix Solus 8′s stability, reliability, and tamperproof interface allow the officials at St. John’s to rest comfortably knowing that their system will sound perfect, week after week.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

SYMETRIX HIRES JEFF SONDERMEYER AS DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING AND CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – OCTOBER 2011: Symetrix, manufacturers of high-end professional audio solutions, specializing in DSP hardware and software, announces the hire of industry veteran Jeff Sondermeyer as Director of Engineering and Chief Technology Officer. Sondermeyer brings almost twenty years of experience to his new role. He split the first decade between Peavey Electronics and Mackie Designs as the Digital Design Leader for pioneering products and he spent the most recent decade with integrated circuit manufacturer Analog Devices (ADI) as Senior Field Apps Engineer. During his tenure at ADI, Sondermeyer helped Symetrix integrate ADI’s Sharc and Blackfin chips into Symetrix products.

“For a number of years, Jeff has been a major player in the pro audio industry, from his design-side engineering management experience with Peavey and Mackie to his applications engineering work for ADI,” said Symetrix founder and CEO, Dane Butcher. “As always, Symetrix maintains an aggressive product development roadmap. We feel very fortunate at this time to have Jeff on board to manage the execution of our strategic product initiatives.”

“Having supported Symetrix for the past ten years, I have an appreciation for how the company works,” said Sondermeyer. “Dane has created a tight-knit team of dedicated people with the same passion – making superior products. It runs more like a family than a business and I really like that! My short-term goal is to join the excellent engineering team, fill in holes, and increase productivity. My long-term goal is to continue fostering the culture at Symetrix that wins loyalty from contractors and other industry clients: superior sound, superior service, superior sales – just superior! No hacks, no workarounds, no excuses – just excellence!”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

CASE STUDY: MIKESOUND USES THE METRIC HALO ULN-8 PREAMP/CONVERTER AS A SONIC SWISS ARMY KNIFE

BLUEFIELDS, NICARAGUA – OCTOBER 2011: Brooklyn-based engineer and producer Michael Gassert, known to his music and film colleagues as “MikeSound,” would appear to spend little time in New York. His uncanny knack for capturing the sonic soul of a musical performance, no matter how remote the location or strained the resources, has earned him the respect of his peers and a full travel calendar. Recently, MikeSound traveled to the Nicaraguan port city of Bluefields (not an easy thing to do) to spend three months recording legendary costeña singers of the regional and endemic musical traditions, most notably Maypole, Mento and Calypso. He relied on a Metric Halo ULN-8′s compact collection of mic-pres, DIs, converters, Character modeling, routing, mixing, and DSP much as an explorer relies on a Swiss Army knife. The ULN-8 was easy to pack and prepared MikeSound to make excellent recordings in unpredictable situations.

A local label, Bluefields Sound System, and MikeSound co-sponsored the project with the help of a small grant from UNESCO. The connection between BSS and MikeSound began five years earlier when together they captured a documentary about the Bluefields musicians. Although MikeSound planned to record some of the same musicians, as well as new performers this time around, the stars of this effort would be two legends of Nicaraguan music, local rivals Mango Ghost and Sabú. Now septuagenarians, the two musicians had defined the musical landscape of Bluefields, but, despite their cultural importance, few recordings of their music have survived. Although young for their age of seventy-something (a local legend has it that Sabú, who still does the splits on stage, is actually more than two hundred years old), the label recognized that the opportunity to record their genius was finite.

Nicaragua’s only international airport is in Managua, on the western side of the country, and a mountain range stands between it and Bluefields on the eastern side of the country. Travel options between the coasts are limited to an eight-hour bus ride plus a three-hour panga boat ride through the jungle, or a mostly reliable puddle jumper instead. MikeSound’s journey with his mobile rig would take him by land, air and sea. “When we conceived the project, I knew mobility and compactness would be essential,” said MikeSound. He began with a four rack-space Calzone case and selected his equipment carefully. “The Metric Halo ULN-8 was the centerpiece,” he said. “That and my MacBook Pro would be the starting point for every recording.” In addition, he brought a Furman P-1800 AR voltage regulator/power conditioner (electricity in Bluefields is reliably unreliable), an RME Fireface 800, and an API 3124 four-channel mic pre.

Bluefields Sound System has makeshift studio, complete with egg crate diffusion and old clothing stuffed into the walls for isolation, that MikeSound planned to use for final vocals, acoustics and keys. However, the studio was too small and dead sounding to do justice to the rhythmic backbone of Mango Ghost and Sabú’s music. Therefore, he spent a month recording the entire songs live to a click in an outdoor restaurant, La Loma, at the highest point in the city. “It’s quiet and calm up there,” he said. To protect himself from the notorious Bluefields thuggery, MikeSound set up and tore down the session every day. He tracked with Digital Performer 7 using a collection of AKG, Shure, Sennheiser, and Schoeps microphones.

“I’ve been a fan of Metric Halo for a long time,” said MikeSound. “They make fantastic preamps and converters, a fact that, by itself, makes their gear stand out. But on top of that, the ULN-8 offers Character modeling, full-blooded DSP, and flexible routing. The character modeling is some of the best I’ve ever heard. It can be very subtle but very authentic and does a nice job of warming things up when needed. And the DSP is also top-notch. The ‘HaloVerb’ sounds as authentic as the UADs I use back in Soho.” MikeSound took advantage of the ULN-8′s flexible routing by creating custom DB-25 cables that allowed him to deliver in-the-box headphone mixes for all of the musicians. “Because I had to set up and tear down so frequently, it was a great time saver to have all of the monitor configurations recallable,” he said.

Currently back in New York and working with partners to launch a new indie label, No Shame, MikeSound also has kept busy for the past six years as the engineer of the Master Musicians of Jajouka, and is completing the mixes for Bluefields Sound System, which will be released in 2012.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Based in New York’s Hudson Valley, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware. www.mhlabs.com

To learn more about and hear some samples from Bluefields Sound System visit: www.bluefieldsound.com To also check out the Master Musicians of Jajouka at: www.jajouka.com/ and No Shame: www.facebook.com/wehaveNoShame

SYMETRIX INTRODUCES SOLUS 16

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – OCTOBER 2011: Symetrix announces an addition to the SymNet Solus product line – the Solus 16. “The Solus 4 and Solus 8 already provide two of the most popular form factors requested by integrators,” said Trent Wagner, senior product manager at Symetrix. “But input counts run higher in many types of installations, and we received a barrage of requests for a higher input form factor. The Solus 16 answers that request without requiring a jump to networked DSP or separate expansion I/O devices maintaining the high value for which the Solus line is known.”

Solus is powerful SymNet DSP hardware, ideal for small to mid-sized installations not requiring I/O expansion. The entire family of SymNet hardware, including Solus, is configured using open architecture SymNet Designer software. System designers have the option to use or modify Solus DSP design templates for basic projects, or, to create unique designs entirely from scratch.

The three Solus hardware offerings differ only in their audio input and output counts: Solus 16 with sixteen inputs and eight outputs, Solus 8 with eight mic/line inputs and eight outputs, and Solus 4 with four inputs and four outputs. Ethernet, ARC port, RS-232 port, two control inputs, and four logic outputs complete the control feature set. To simplify set-up, a front panel LCD displays system settings. Solus supports Symetrix ARC wall panels, third party control systems, and SymVue, a SymNet end-user control panel application.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

API ANNOUNCES KIMLENG AUDIO AS NEW JDK DEALER

JESSUP, MARYLAND – OCTOBER 2011: After representing API for the past two years, Kimleng Audio has recently been signed as a dealer for the company’s JDK Audio line. The signing is an important step in increasing both API and JDK’s presence in the Asia Pacific.

“After meeting with Thanong Saeheng recently at the Broadcast Asia show in Singapore, I’m even more convinced that Kimleng Audio is the right way for us to go in Thailand,” said Gordon Smart, managing director at API. “They’re focused, street-smart, and tuned into the market. I don’t think we could have made a better choice.”

Thanong Saeheng, owner of Kimleng Audio, said, “We are so glad that API thought of us when it came time to make JDK a prominent audio brand in Thailand. We’re looking forward to helping the brand reach the forefront of the professional audio world.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment. www.apiaudio.com

For information on Kimleng Audio, please visit: www.KimlengAudio.com

Yamaha Training Heads to Redmond, Washington

BUENA PARK, Calif.— YCATS (Yamaha Commercial Audio Training Seminars) training sessions have been set for Overland Christian Church Redmond, Washington and open to all audio professionals, free of charge. The three-day session dates are November 8-10 from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm with classes being held for advanced users of the Yamaha M7CL digital console, a workshop for the LS9 digital console, digital network and systems design clinic, and a showcase of NEXO speaker technology (GEO Series, PS Series, 45N12, RS Series Subs, GeoSUB, and NXAMP).

The M7CL advanced training is a one-day course that will reveal the depth of the M7CL and will discuss how best to utilize the console to the full extent of its capabilities. Attendees will expand their knowledge of the console and its capabilities with an opportunity to apply what is learned using multi-track audio on the new M7CL-ES digital mixing console.

The LS9 workshop is a half-day, hands-on course, learning the basics of mixing on an LS9 digital console. Attendees will become more familiar with the console layout; learn how to navigate the system, setup mix busses as an aux or group, and how to route signal to the effects units, with an opportunity to apply what is learned using multi-track audio.

The digital network and systems design clinic is a full-day course offering an array of audio networking, acoustic system design, and systems solutions workshops. The workshops will benefit anyone interested in upgrading or designing audio systems.

Registration deadline for all sessions is November 6. To register for Yamaha class sessions, visit http://www.yamahacommercialaudiosystems.com/training.php?catID=11001.
To register for NEXO showcase, email ycats@yamaha.com.

On November 10 from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm, an Audio Master Class will be held as part of the Christian Musician Summit at Overlake Christian Church with Yamaha’s Jake Cody, Mark Rush, and Peter Robinson teaching an audio boot camp for church volunteers. Cost: $99 per person. For course syllabus and registration visit: http://www.christianmusiciansummit.com/templates/cuscms/details.asp?id=32393&PID=805358.

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Minnesota Church Stays On Leading Edge of Technology With Upgrade To 96k/Optics-Capable SD10 Console

Minnesota’s Eagle Brook Church prides itself on staying at the leading edge of technology for its ever-evolving production and broadcast needs. In 2010, the thriving house of worship, which opened in late 2005 and accommodates over 2100 in stadium-style seating—retooled its overall technical infrastructure at its main Lino Lakes campus location, adding three DiGiCo SD8 consoles and DiGiRacks for FOH, monitors and video broadcast production. Flash-forward to the spring of 2011, and the audio team is at it again. Working closely with Audio Logic Systems, the latest upgrade set in motion swapped two of the SD8s at FoH and monitor world with one of DiGiCo’s newest 96k/2 gig optics-capable SD10B broadcast console loaded with the DiGiCo Waves SoundGrid plug-in bundle. They also added three SDRacks, one dedicated to the SD10 and the other two distributed within the facility. In turn, the two SD8s and DiGiRacks were migrated to the Spring Lake Park and Woodbury facilities. The changes at the main Lino Lakes campus had a ripple effect throughout, allowing all the Eagle Brook engineers at each facility to mix on similar DiGiCo platforms.

Audio mix pro Adam Bufis was brought in to work as audio director, to transition and streamline the multiple facilities, to facilitate the newest gear integrations, and to provide a mix position for the broadcast hub at the main location. With a decade of touring experience working with major Christian artists from Casting Crowns to Lincoln Brewster, and Israel Houghton for the last several years, Bufis brought a savvy technical prowess and mixing expertise to the church. The choice of the broadcast console offered many great features for live sound and for Bufis, including 5.1 surround, fader backstop solo and more.

“Originally, the radar was out to get a newer or bigger desk at our main broadcast location,” Bufis explained. “I’d mixed a ton on the SD7 and have a lot of experience on that and with DiGiCo, and really liked the added benefits available with the optical network. We started to look at what it would take to get an SD7 into our main campus as our needs were growing there. We also wanted to bump up to 96K, and I personally wanted to bring in the Waves plug-in package. So when the SD10 came out, it was almost a no-brainer just the cost-factor. With the SD8s, I was filling all 60 channels plus returning stuff with insert returns on groups, so to expand it out to a bigger channel count was almost a necessary move for us. With our ever-expanding band and orchestra, and all the loop/track/bass stuff, that starts adding up as does the input channels. Another big push for me was to get it all running on optical, using an RME MADI bridge for distribution. Before, we were running RME MADI signals to a bunch of different areas for recording and multitrack stuff. With the optical network, it just made the whole system a lot more functional and easy to use, versus flipping switches and changing routing on the MADI bridges. I can do it all basically at the desk now.

To accomplish his optical networking dream, Bufis was able to run an HMA fiber optics loop for backup redundancies and a total of 2 SD Racks, and 1 DiGiRack placed in various locations in the building—two near the stage and one in the broadcast studio—to supply the different audio feeds from each source. “The addition of the SDRacks, even at 48K took a step up! It had a much more clean and clear sound. I’ve always been a fan of the DiGiCo sound anyway, but it made a noticeable difference to us merely by just changing that. And then once we bumped up to 96K, it was even more of a noticeable difference with overall clarity and sonic performance.”

At FOH on a typical weekend, Bufis estimates Eagle Brook is running 40-45 inputs total to handle its service flow, which he says is a 50/50 mix of music and message. “We rely heavily on the production aspect for our worship experience, using LEDs, video, lighting and of course audio. We have a full band comprised of drums, bass, a few guitars, usually 4 stereo keyboard channels-worth of inputs, sometimes a small horn section of 3-5 pieces and normally we’re running anywhere from 5 to 8 background vocals and we incorporate a lot of loop-based stuff from Pro Tools. Typically, I’m running anywhere from 2-10 channels of anything from a percussive loop to a string loop to a vocal loop or whatever, and on our bigger weekends, we incorporate orchestral string sections, the biggest of which was 30-pieces, where I was running 101 analog inputs and 60 digital ones. I was able to lay the SD10 out so that I could change scenes and inputs, and to generally manage that many inputs on not a whole lot of faders for the live side of things.”

As for outputs, the SD10 is accommodating quite a few in the sanctuary for its “robust” PA. “As our room seats just under 3000 in our main campus, I have a few different hangs with group outputs going to each zone: my main L/R, main outhangs, separate controls for front, outfills and subs, and we have a 70-volt distribution system throughout the building that handles mainly overhead-type speakers that we send a feed to. I also have a full split for our broadcast suite SD8, that is outputting all 24 groups of stereo outputs to 48 digital input devices from DVRs to digital recorders to our broadcast send. We use a Mako system that utilizes microwave technology to send point-to-point signals to our other campuses, which is how they receive our simulcast message in HD video and AES audio. We have a center HD screen in each location that comes down right to the stage floor with a 6’ projected image of our pastor, and it surprises most people because it’s pretty life-like. All of that is done in HD, from the filming to the projection to the broadcast, and it’s pretty impressive. It gives the small church building a large church feel. All campuses have a live band and their own worship pastor, so outside of running our Lino Lakes simulcast sermon, it gives each of the satellite locations the opportunity to be unique.”

When asked to single out some of his favorite features on their new console, Bufis couldn’t help but rave about the SD10’s expandable GPI and GPO connections, as well as the configurable Smart Key Macros. “The GPI/GPO is huge! I love using GPI triggers out of my console to fire lobby music to start, credits to roll, and for my CD to start and stop recording—all of that is all pre-programmed in my snapshots and then controlled through GPI triggers. That, on the setup side of things, has made rolling through show time very seamless, and has taken it almost from a two-man job to a one-man position at FOH, where I’m firing everything from hardware to music. Also, I love the Smart Keys on the SD10. I love identifying them with coloring and digital labeling. Having more than just the macro buttons, I’ve started getting into more advanced shows where I have 80-100 snapshots, and it’s nice to lay those out on the Smart Keys to visually go to something quickly if I need to. I’d say those are the two biggest things I’ve found to love. However, I have to say I also really like the black color of the console. Black and gray are my two favorite colors, and the look of it is very stealthy.”

It was important for Bufis to add the Waves SoundGrid bundle in order to streamline and simplify his outboard gear. “All of our outboard gear is now completely gone; we ripped out all our BSS and Drawmer outboard stuff and now I am basically rocking the Waves SoundGrid and the console at FOH. I love all the onboard offerings from DiGiCo, but the addition of the Waves package has given the console a new character. In particular, I use the Mercury bundle quite a bit, which gives me a plethora to pick through. I use a lot of the CLA compressors on vocals and drums, and the Fairchild compressors used on bass and guitar give it an amazing character. Basically, I don’t use any onboard compression right now; most of it is done mainly through the CLA or the Fairchild’s. I do use the SSL master bus on the output of the master. I’ve started to use some of the SSL channel strips for some of the EQ and on a few vocal channels, and I use another inserted SSL or CLA EQ. Again, sonic performance is key for me and I just love the sound of some of these compressors. I’m using about 12 of the 16 racks, racked on various drums, mainly rhythm section inputs, and I’m using the compressors on vocals. I’m using one Ultramaximizer, usually on my outputs, as well as for broadcasting, so it has a more mastered sound going out to our campuses.” There are lots of things to access in my toolbox artistically.

At monitor world, he also swapped out their in-ear monitoring system. “Before we were using an Aviom system for a segment of the in-ears as we have a split of mixed ears as well as personal mixers in use. Stepping up to the new Roland M48 mixers, they have an SMADI device, which takes a MADI signal and converts it to their REAC system, allowing me to pipe a MADI signal from the console to feed to the Roland units. That too, was a pretty night-and-day upgrade for us. It has great functionality and really expanded what we do by allowing me to assign each mixer its own set of channel counts. Before, with the Aviom system, you only got a generic 16 channels to patch to. Now, with the Roland, you can patch everybody’s mixer separate from each other. It gives you a whole lot of flexibility with band members wanting specific things on those mixers.”

Bufis is running a Pro Tools rig on the FOH console, routed off a MADI connection from the SDRack and uses the GPI/GPOs to trigger the start and stop of those session files within Pro Tools. This was key in order to streamline both FOH and monitor functions into one console. The use of Smart Key Macros was key in managing monitor outputs. “The snapshots there are pretty robust and using the macros to lay those out functionally and color-code them is huge, as is the ability to rack more than two racks. We quickly grew out of just having two racks into three, and now even four and five MADI devices. So with the SD10, we can have a couple of optical racks and MADI racks needed in both those positions.”

With services on both weekend days, the audio team has built in time on Sunday morning to do a recap of previous productions. This playback is a way for everyone, including the band, to take a disconnected look and listen to the overall production experience and to share feedback on what works and what needs improvement. “We’re getting amazing feedback from them on how the whole system is performing, from the sonic quality to the mix. I would say, from musicians to pastors alike, the addition of the SD10s, SD Racks and optics, has definitely been an improvement and noticed by all, which is amazing as many of us come from a secular and Christian touring background and bring more of a show-type mentality to how things are done here. We like the term, ‘go big or go home.’ We try to stay relevant and like keep an eye out on what other houses of worship within the US are doing and I think in comparison, we fare quite high. All of us hold to a pretty high production value and standard and we’re pretty progressive on stage and set design, too. We’re constantly adding gear to stay on top of the latest technology. For us, the addition of the newest DiGiCo console was such a great thing. When I look at a console, the biggest thing for me is the sound quality. I can kind of get around hard-to-function desks or ones that may not be as intuitive if the sound quality is there. What I love about the SD10 is it has it all: a massively huge sonic quality and an easy to use, intuitive, fully functional user interface. And that for me, hands-down, is why I think it’s the best for us as a facility and for me as a mix engineer.”

Visual Acuity broadens skill base with new hire

Theatre lighting and production specialist Damian Andrews becomes a Lead Consultant, Project Development at Visual Acuity.

Theatre lighting and production specialist Damian Andrews becomes a Lead Consultant, Project Development at Visual Acuity.

Theatre lighting and production specialist Damian Andrews becomes a Lead Consultant, Project Development at Visual Acuity.

Independent technology consultancy Visual Acuity is expanding once again, this time appointing Damian Andrews to the position of Lead Consultant, Project Development. Andrews brings a fresh perspective to the consultancy with a wealth of experience working in various project roles ranging from client user, owner,operator and integrator.

This key role has both internal and customer-facing dimensions, as Blair Parkin, Managing Director, Visual Acuity, explains:

“The technological scope of our work continues to develop, as does our geographical reach – we are currently working on projects as far afield as Asia, the Middle East, the US and Europe.

“Damian will lead and champion our customers’ interests and provide advice and support to architects, building engineers, vendors and other service providers on each project.”

In addition to project-management expertise, Andrews also brings specialist skills in stage lighting and production to the party – significantly broadening Visual Acuity’s range of technological competencies as the diversity of the company’s customer base continues to grow.

Andrews’ industry experience dates back to the mid-1990s when, while studying for a Diploma in Audio Visual Design, he worked in the technical department of the UK’s Middlesbrough Theatre. He subsequently studied Electrical Engineering for Theatre, before embarking on a large-scale musical as production electrician and working as Company Stage Manager for the Carl Rosa Opera Company. Several years travelling the world as a technical manager in the cruise-ship industry culminated in the appointment as Senior Production Manager on the Queen Mary 2 overseeing the operation of multiple and varied entertainment spaces.

“The QM2 featured the world’s first Planetarium at Sea, and it was while working there that I developed a passion for planetarium design, technology and content,” Andrews explains. “After returning to dry land to work as an event technician and convention-centre operations manager in New Zealand, I was delighted to be approached by Sky-Skan, Inc., to work on a planetarium installation for them there.”

Andrews subsequently worked on other planetarium projects for Sky-Skan all over the world, including the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco – which is where he first came to the attention of Visual Acuity. He now joins Visual Acuity from Staging Connections, an event services company in Melbourne, Australia, where he was Operations Manager. Prior to that, he was Technical Director and Chief Lighting Technician at the Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

Andrews has returned to the UK where he will be based at Visual Acuity’s Brighton HQ. “This appointment gives me the perfect opportunity to use the skills I have gained from working in varied industries around the globe, to compliment what is already a well-respected and experienced team,” he concludes. “I am absolutely delighted to be joining Visual Acuity.”

www.visual-acuity.com

Prism Projection Introduces Next Generation RevEAL Studio Fresnel at LDI 2011

Prism Projection, Inc. will be offering attendees at LDI 2011 the opportunity to see the next generation of lighting technology with not only a product launch but also a head to head comparison of source technologies. With the launch of the third generation RevEAL Studio Fresnel 3 (SF3) Prism expands their multi-award winning RevEAL line of products by offering designers yet another way to use LED technology as their primary source within a familiar fixture format. Another highlight of the Prism booth (#1519) will be the head to head comparison of the popular RevEAL Profile luminaire with an ETC Source Four 750-Watt ellipsoidal. Stop in and see why so many designers consider the RevEAL Profile a true ‘go to’ option for primary illumination.

“Many lighting designers consider the 750-Watt Source Four as a benchmark when comparing lights,” notes Garrett Young, President and Founder of Prism Projection, Inc. “During the show, we will give attendees the opportunity to see the Source Four alongside our RevEAL Profile, which we consider to be the future of framing profile spotlights. It has the output of traditional sources at a fraction of the power consumption, while still providing designers with beam-shaping shutters and edge-to-edge crisp projections coupled with high color rendering and excellent output.”

Many designers have quickly embraced the RevEAL Profile, which has received multiple awards throughout the industry, including the Best Debuting Product in the Lighting Category at last year’s LDI. The RevEAL Profile is a true high-CRI, LED Profile Spot with a lumen output of 16,000 lumens, a variable Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) range of 2,800–6,500K, an adjustable focus from hard to a very soft edge, changeable lenses for beam angles from 14º–70º, and a flat field. It also has four shutters on a tri-plane; accepts M-size gobos; uses DMX, Art-Net, or local control; and features a universal power input of 90–260V AC.prism-reveal-studio-barndoors.jpg

Debuting at LDI this year, is Prism’s new Studio Fresnel 3, with an output of 7,600 lumens and a Color Rendering Index (CRI) > 92, offers the ability to get clean cuts with standard barndoors and a wider range of beam angle adjustment—from a very narrow 8° to an extra wide 70°. The SF3 uses a manual zoom focus mechanism to smoothly and easily go from spot to flood. “We’ve been able to reduce the source size to enable the SF3 to work with the barndoor as well as allow for the tighter spot without any loss in output from the previous two models, adds Young.” Both the SF1 and SF2 will still be available in the Prism RevEAL line alongside the SF3 giving people the choice of the right tool for their particular application.

The SF3 reacts to the cuts and shaping of barndoors the same as a conventional Fresnel fixture and is the same form factor as a traditional 8” Fresnel. With a total power draw of 250-Watts, the SF3 is brighter than a 1kW Fresnel with a tungsten source. The RevEAL Studio Fresnels provide high lumen output, unparalleled color rendering, tunable CCT from 2,800–8,000K, a wide color palette with repeatability, and beam quality guaranteed by TrueSource® color management technology.

“We wanted to give lighting designers the ability to use our products in a similar manner that they are used to working,” says Young. “With the design of the SF3, we built on the accomplishments of the previous Studio Fresnel models and added in the ability to work seamlessly with a standard barndoor in shaping the beam. We were also able to engineer a tighter spot focus going from the previous narrow spot of 20° now down to an 8° spot.”
Both the RevEAL Studio Fresnel 3 and the RevEAL Profile will be demonstrated alongside the multi-award winning RevEAL Color Wash luminaire. Also be sure to come in for the head to head comparison of the RevEAL Profile to the ETC Source Four taking place each day in Prism’s booth #1519 at LDI.

Prism Projection – See what you’ve been missing.®

For more information about Prism Projection, Inc., please go to: www.prismprojection.com

About Prism Projection, Inc.
In the fall of 2009 Prism introduced the first of the RevEAL line of products, the Color Wash. Almost instantly the RevEAL CW generated industry awards and attention, including Best Debuting Product for Lighting at LDI 2009. In 2010, Prism again moved LED technology forward with the debut of the RevEAL Profile. RevEAL has received numerous product awards from LDI, WFX, ABTT, and Live Design tradeshows and magazines. Prism Projection’s products create specific colored light with high rendering indexes in instruments capable of maintaining that color output. The innovative TrueSource® color management and calibration system allows products to deliver exact color without many of the operational concerns of other LED systems.

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