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Yamaha CL Premium Rack and Familiarity Key Factors For Youth Event

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Held in late January 2013 at the Pheasant Run Convention Center in St. Charles, Illinois, Willow Creek Community Church hosted Blast 13 a youth group retreat for approximately 1,400, produced by the Willow Creek Student Impact Ministry, with audio support provided by TC Furlong (Chicago).

One Yamaha CL5 digital audio console accompanied by two Rio3224-D input/output racks were used at front of house with a CL1 selected for monitor mixing along with two ProPlex Gigabit switches for network redundancy. “Network redundancy was important because of the high-profile nature of the event,” states Chris Wintz, Rental Manager, TC Furlong. “The crew at Willow Creek likes to have backup/redundant systems whenever possible.”

”Since the CL5 was already specified as the front of house console after the Willow Creek team attended a demo, and challenged with keeping the monitor mix area to a small footprint yet needing a system with ample mix buses, the CL1 was a one-stop solution,” says Wintz. “In the 13 years with have collaborated with the Willow Creek team, this was one of the most streamlined solutions we’ve put together.”

“We decided on the CL system for a number of reasons,” states Nathan Miller, Systems Designer/Engineer, Miller Audio Services (Chicago), audio contractor for the event (assisted by systems engineer Matt Satorius). “One factor was the ability to use the Premium Rack Portico plug-ins. We used the Portico 5033 EQ and 5043 Compression on the lead vocals at both front of house and monitors. We also used the U-76 plug-in at front of house across the drum bus as well as the Opt-2A plug-in to add a mastered sound to the IEM mix busses at monitors. The other major factor was the overall efficiency of the setup and strike. Switching to a digital snake really helped make the overall load in/load out easier. Not only were the FOH/MON runs much cleaner, but the split was much cleaner and easier to troubleshoot.”

Miller said the CL5s were easy to operate by event engineers Stephen Kendeigh and Ryan Pribyl due to console familiarity since the pair use Yamaha consoles for regular youth services. “Blast 2013 represented a major step forward not only in our audio system architecture, but in the overall sound quality of the event,” states Troy Bartholomew, Technical Director for the ministry who oversaw all of the production for the event. “Nathan’s choice of the CL Series streamlined our setup while giving us more features and flexibility than we have had in past events. Also, Ryan and Stephen’s ability to utilize the fantastic new features really elevated the audio experience for all of our students. Throughout the weekend, I received a lot of positive feedback from industry veterans, audio contractors, and Willow production staff who were able to come in and listen to the system.”

One of the largest churches in the U.S. with an attendance of 20,000 on any given weekend, Willow Creek regularly host retreats for youth and adults for their congregation. This particular event featured guest presenters along with a church house band of seven musicians and vocalists. For more information on Willow Creek, visit www.willowcreek.org.

For more information on TC Furlong, visit www.tcfurlong.com.

For more information on Miller Audio Services, visit www.masiaudio.com.

For more information on Yamaha CL consoles, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Ball Delivers With DiGiCo

The perennially touring Lady Gaga is at it again. The five-time Grammy winner is in the midst of the Born This Way Ball tour, a seemingly endless succession of dates that will hit virtually every corner of the globe for more than a year—or longer. The elaborately gothic-inspired production was birthed in Seoul, Korea, in April of 2012 and has received glowing reviews (“the best live show you will see this year,” per the UK Sun newspaper) and was honored as Major Tour of the Year at the Pollstar Concert Industry Awards.

Eighth Day Sound is again at the helm of the production, coordinating multiple universal stadium systems that at times are air-freighted with the stage set, leapfrogging across several continents to meet the tour.

“Each tour system is comprised of two DiGiCo SD7 Mach III systems at FOH outfitted with Waves and two Waves servers, with one running on a UPS for redundancy,” explains Eighth Day Chief Technology Officer Jason Kirschnick. “A 192kHz DiGiCo SD Rack at FOH is loaded with 32 analog ins/32 analog outs, as well as 24 AES ins/outs for local I/O. At the stage end for FOH are two more 192 SD racks loaded with 48 analog ins, eight AES ins, eight AES and eight analog outs. We are deploying an Optocore switcher so there are three fiber loops for FOH—one loop of all three racks for FOH is connected to a Route 66 Optocore fiber router device. The primary console is in a loop with the two respective engines to the Route 66 as well as the second SD7 at FOH in a loop with the Route 66. This enables us with a push of one button to move the entire rack loop between the two FOH consoles for support acts and dual redundancy. At the monitor end is another SD7 running two Waves 9 servers (with one running on a UPS). There are two more 192kHz SD Racks at monitors loaded with 48 analog, eight digital inputs, 40 analog and eight digital outputs each.”

The PA system is d&b audiotechnik, comprised of 96 d&B J Series made up of a combination of J8 and J12s (4 x hangs; 24 boxes deep), 32 d&B Flow J subs (4 x hangs of 8 deep), 48 d&B B2 subs on the ground (stacked on each side of the stage and along the front of the stage), 12 d&B Q7 front fills (spread across the front of the stage), with a stadium delay system consisting of 4 x hangs of 12 d&B V8 and V12s. [pictured: Chris Rabold FOH with Eighth Day Sound Chief Technology Officer/Project Manager, Jason Kirschnick]

“The system is all-digital at 96kHz,” adds Kirschnick, “with a complete analog backup comprised of Dolby Lakes and LM44s with wireless control of the complete system. The d&B amplifiers are all monitored and controlled remotely through the entire system as well.”

The five-piece band consists of bass, two guitars, a sizable drum kit and a lot of stereo bass and keyboard elements, plus a programmer who supplies various stems. There are 70-some inputs at FOH, including talkbacks and audience mics and Lady Gaga’s various headset and handheld mics.

“I came onboard between legs of the tour,” explains Chris Rabold, whose previous gigs include stints with Beyoncé, The Fray and Widespread Panic. “I knew I’d only have a couple days of rehearsal before the first show so I went ahead and put a plan into effect that would ensure that I’d be as close to show-ready as I could be once we hit Bulgaria, the site of the first show on the second leg of the tour. I spec’d an SD7 for me at FOH above all else for its sonic quality. It has a million and one great features but at the end of the day, it’s the sound of the desk and the sound of my mixes through the desk that matter the most. The DiGiCo consoles simply sound better than anything else out there. There are several strong platforms in the digital console realm, but this is the one. Period. [pictured: FOH Tech/Recording Engineer Wayne Bacon; FOH Engineer, Chris Rabold; Systems Engineer, Mike "Stacker" Hackman]

“I built the console offline on my computer and sent the file to the guys at Eighth Day, who prepped the desk. From there I was able to get on the console in Los Angeles for a few days, where I worked with the tour programmer on some tracks. The desk then bounced back to the Eighth Day shop in Cleveland where I worked some more on it, concentrating on some of the finer details with routing, system integration, etc. By the time we made it to load-in, I had a basic gain structure in hand, my EQs were at a decent starting point, I had a good idea of what dynamic processing I needed, snapshots written for each song, effects laid out… Basically every last detail was in place before I even saw the band—and this was on a show with a pretty sizable number of inputs. All of the work I was able to do beforehand was absolutely invaluable.”

Rabold cites the flexibility of the snapshot section as one of the main features of the desk that aids in his daily workflow. “With a big pop show like this that is scripted very carefully, the goal is consistency and more or less perfection every single night. I don’t think we’ll ever get the perfection part of that equation down, but we can sure get the consistency through the use of snapshots. The SD7 is so much more configurable than other platforms. You can tweak it snapshot by snapshot, not just globally across all snapshots because automation is and isn’t recall safe. This is tremendously helpful and keeps you from being tied to an all-or-nothing kind of mindset. For example, if I know I want to handle a bass guitar input in the traditional sense and just EQ on the fly for a few numbers, I can do that. But if I also know that by snapshot 17 I want it to have a very specific sort of treatment, I can have it where the recall safe feature comes off and suddenly that input is recalling precisely what had been written previously. It really allows you to be flexible when you need to be and by-the-book-exact when you want to go that route, all on a per-song basis.”

Asked about outboard gear, he says he’s using a combination of outboard and onboard plug-ins. “I basically use some of the same analog things I’ve used on and off for years on certain inputs just because I know they work for me. Lead vocal and drums see the outboard devices. I use the console’s onboard complements of EQ, effects and dynamics for the real nuts-and-bolts work. The overwhelming majority of the inputs see nothing but onboard processing. As far as plug-ins go, I try to use the Waves server more as an effects device. I pull a lot of delays and specialty things from there and it’s definitely a crucial part of the mix structure. I use C6s on the playback stems. A lot of times tracks can be overly bright or overly boomy for what really works live. These allow me to reshape certain frequency ranges yet keep the overall feel and intent of the tracks in place. These are my go-to problem solvers for playback stems in the live pop world. I use the Super Tap delays and H Delays as well. They sound great and can be synced to a song’s BPM. Both of these are very flexible with how you can color them and how you can manipulate individual left and right sides of a stereo delay. Very cool. I use an L2 limiter on the output of a two-track mix as well. This is very handy when I know a board mix might be taken from the night and then played back by the artist right next to fully mastered album mixes. I want my mixes to sound competitively loud with anything they might be referenced to. You never know. Little stuff like that can go a long way toward keeping everyone happy.”

Rabold says he multitracks nightly, mainly just for virtual soundchecking and to tweak his mixes during downtime. “When time permits, I can play back a show and tweak things in the mix. I do rely on this ability and have for several years now. Soundchecking in an empty room can be pointless. Listening to a mix with nearfields or headphones that have a response that you’re familiar with can be way more helpful when it comes to listening critically and judging what’s needed in a mix. We go standard MADI out of the desk and convert that to optical MADI via an RME MADI Bridge. From there the signal goes into SSL Delta-Links, where it is converted to HD so that we can record to Pro Tools. Pro Tools 9 is running on a MacPro with a ridiculous amount of memory due to the staggering track count. Because there are so many tracks and because we’re recording at 96kHz, we split the audio files across three SSD drives.”

Ramon Morales, who’s mixed monitors previously for Beyoncé as well as other A-list artists including Destiny’s Child, Mariah Carey, Mary J Blige and Pitbull, handles monitors for the band members, all of whom are on Sennheiser 2000 series IEM systems (with JH Audio JH16 custom in-ears), as well as the audio techs. He oversees a total of 12 stereo mixes, flown side fills, bass and drum subs, two mono mixes (for drum subs and thumpers on bass and drums) and several stereo FX sends. [pictured: Monitor Engineer, Ramon Morales; Audio Crew, Lee-Fox-Furnel; Audio Crew Chief/Monitor, Tech Klocker]

“Everything about the console is great,” he enthuses. “Sonically, it’s one of the best consoles out there and definitely my favorite. I can have as many ins and outs as I need or want, and having the backup console mirrored—as well as all the other features it has—what else would you want? I’ve found the Macro feature to be very useful. We’ve set many of them up to do specific things for the show and no matter where I am on the console, I can access what I need on the macro section without having to scroll through aux sends or layers and banks. Our show intercom system is also routed through the monitor console, so the techs that need show comms in their mix can have it and plenty of talkback mics using the macros.

“I’m also using many of the built-in effects including Waves to add different colors to the mix. My favorite has to be the SSL channel and the C4, which I mainly use for my vocal inputs, since the console itself sounds great. I just use them to enhance what is already there. The only outboard gear we’re using is a TC Electronics 6000 reverb system for a vocal verb. It’s a Gold Plate and one of my favorites for vocals; it’s very smooth and cuts through just enough to hear it and not overpower anything else going on in the mix. I also use it for a drum verb.”

The console’s ability to receive a video feed aids both Morales and Rabold in managing the spontaneous stage antics of the mercurial artist. “This is crucial when mixing monitors from under the stage,” says Morales, “and having limited sightlines. Having a program feed straight into the console really helps.”

“I barely even look at the stage now,” adds Rabold. “This especially comes in handy when I have to watch for the moments where she yanks off her headset mic and goes for the handheld. There’s no cue for that and being able to see it on a screen two feet in front of my face sure beats trying to see what she’s doing 150 feet away across a sea of fans!”

A great deal of time and planning was invested prior to launching the multiple systems in the field, to ensure the production ran as smoothly as possible with no margin of error. “I personally spent weeks researching and testing the fiber loops and to failsafe the redundancy on as many things as possible,” Kirschnick reflects. “I did this research and testing at our shop in Cleveland, and a great deal of time was spent making sure everything was running smoothly weeks before the tour embarked on its first show last spring. And now, with over six months of time logged with the systems in the field, the band and crew think the console and sound system sound incredible and unmatched.”

Eighth Day tour crew:
Chris Rabold: Foh Engineer
Ramon Morales: Monitor Engineer
Dan Klocker: Audio Crew Chief / Monitor Tech
Wayne Bacon: Audio Crew
Christopher Bellamy: Audio Crew
Bill Flugan: RF Tech
Lee Fox-Furnell: Audio Crew
Mike “Stacker” Hackman: Systems Engineer
James La Marca: Show Coms / Audio Tech
Matt Strakis: Audio Crew

Draper Introduces Video Conferencing Accessories

For effective video conferencing in today’s multi-use conference rooms and other venues, you need the required technology precisely where you need it, when you need it—but out of sight when you don’t. Draper has introduced several new products designed to do just that.

Draper’s Video Conferencing Camera Lift-Ceiling allows the placement of a video conferencing camera directly behind a motorized projection screen; the camera raises and lowers with the screen.

The Video Conferencing Camera Lift–Credenza hides your camera in virtually any conference room furnishing, ready to be raised at any time by simple remote operation.

Draper’s Video Conferencing Camera Adapter Bracket allows a video conferencing camera to be mounted in a Draper ceiling recessed projector lift. The bracket is available with three Draper lift models; choose the lift based on how far down out of the ceiling the camera needs to travel.

Draper also offers three unique types of backgrounds to bring your video conferencing to life, help you communicate more effectively and set your content apart. Draper’s neutral backgrounds come in six muted earth tones, and eliminate distractions, help prevent unwanted interference, control room lighting and ensure a consistent corporate image. Custom printed backgrounds can contain custom artwork, photographs, corporate logos and more. Chroma Key Backgrounds, typically referred to as “blue screen” or “green screen” technology, make it easy to change background images or show live action video footage.

For more information on Draper’s new telepresence line, visit www.draperinc.com/VideoConferencing/index.asp.

Boogie Woogie Christmas with Yamaha CL5s

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Brian Setzer Orchestra (BSO) recently completed their ninth annual Christmas Rocks! Extravaganza 26-show full of fan favorites performed by Setzer and his 18-piece orchestra off the Boogie Woogie Christmas album.

BSO boogied through the Christmas tour with two Yamaha CL5 Digital Audio Consoles and four Rio3224-D input/output boxes, provided by Sound Image of Escondido, California, who provided audio production for the tour.

James ‘Jimbo’ Neal mixed front of house using a Yamaha CL5 with two Rio3224-Ds, and Eric Scott used a second CL5 for the monitor mix along with a second pair Rio3224-Ds. “We ran the Rio boxes, which were in pairs at FOH and monitors, in redundancy through two custom-made switches from Sound Image with the assistance of Joe Lopez from Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems,” states Neal.“ The CL console sounds like nothing else from Yamaha, and I found it to be a little more forgiving with a warmer low-mid and a smoother high end. I love the Premium Rack with the Rupert Neve Designs compressor and EQ.”

Neal said he previously used Dante software and hardware with a PM5D and Cubase 6 on the Rockabilly Riot Tour, where he multi-tracked every show later used for a live CD release,” Live From The Planet ” on Surf Dog Records. “The integration between the CL, Dante software, and Nuendo Live is seamless, and has made my life much easier.”

“Using the CL5 on this run of the tour was an amazing experience,” adds Scott, sighting the custom fader banks as a favorite feature which, he said, really helped out when in flip fade mode. “The combination of the Sound Image MA112 monitor wedge and the CL5 gave us the cleanest stage I ever had for Setzer.”

For more information, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Yamaha CL5 is the Cornerstone of Detroit Metro Church

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Cornerstone Baptist Church in Roseville, Michigan recently upgraded from analog to digital when it installed a Yamaha CL5 Digital Audio Console and two Rio 3224-Ds input/output racks. The church seats 2,000 and has a congregation of 1,300 with a blended worship consisting of full band, orchestra, choir, and worship team.

Sound Planning Communications, Inc. of Redford, Michigan, recommended the new CL determining it would be an ideal fit for the church upgrade. “The church required 72 inputs but price played a key factor as well,” states Nathan J. Cole, Director of Sales, Sound Planning. The system was installed with an integrated Waves plug-in package including Vocal Rider, C6, Bass Rider, and Renaissance De-esser.

“We have used Sound Planning for the past few years on several different projects, and they have always been great,” states Josh Scott, church TD. “Nathan Cole has always done a wonderful job helping us figure out what we need and meeting our budget. We had been looking towards purchasing a new console for about two years, and in addition to 72 inputs, we needed at least 16 AUX outputs because of our orchestra, choir, band, and other musical events we hold. Initially, we were looking at one that would have cost us $20,000 more than the CL and didn’t have Virtual Sound Check or an iPad app. The day I heard the Yamaha CL5 had been introduced, I called Nathan who told me that it was priced at $20,000 less than the other console we were looking at, and I was astounded!”

Scott said what he noticed right away was how clean everything sounded. “After our first weekend with the new console, I had people coming up to me saying that it was the best it ever sounded. Having the Waves system has helped me put the finishing touches on my mix. Also, not having to consistently re-patch inputs along with the ability to save channel settings has saved us a lot of time and frustration.”

“We have been delighted with the flexibility and intuitive nature of our Yamaha CL5,” adds church Worship Pastor, Dr. Nathan Platt. “The console is easy to navigate from the broadest spread of instrumentation we employ to the simplest public speaking setup. The CentraLogic section of the board is so user-friendly for sound operators who serve less frequently on our technical team, and the ability to save extensive presets has proved exceedingly helpful, as has the constant use of the iPad for operation outside the sound booth. We have been so pleased with the “bells and whistles” afforded us by Yamaha’s VCM technology and the freedom to employ various Waves effects, be it for compression, equalization enhancement, or signal clarification. These effects have made a world of difference with respect to the refinement of all our mic’ing.”

“The combined digital workflow improvements, sound quality, noise reduction, Virtual Soundcheck, and digital effects have the church thrilled with the CL installation,” Cole says. “Now that they have become more knowledgeable about Dante, they are excited and looking forward to future upgrades of their DSP using full Dante networking as well as wireless systems directly tying into the Dante network.”

For more information on Cornerstone Baptist Church, visit www.cbcroseville.org.

For more information on Sound Planning Communications, Inc. visit www.soundplanning.net.

For more information on the Yamaha CL5, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

LECTROSONICS INTRODUCES DNT BOB 88 DANTE™ BREAKOUT BOX

**** Photo: Lectrosonics DNT BOB 88 Dante™ Breakout Box ****

Rio Rancho, NM – February 2013… Lectrosonics, recognized the world over as a leading manufacturer of wireless microphone systems and audio processing products, is pleased to announce the new DNT BOB 88 Dante Breakout Box for use with the company’s ASPEN Dante network processor or other Dante hardware. The DNT BOB 88 is a high quality, general purpose interface designed to transmit and receive line level analog audio signals via a Dante network. This new breakout box is an outstanding choice for creating a bidirectional digital snake for stage productions, sending audio to a remote recording location in a courtroom complex, or delivering audio to remote amplifiers and loudspeakers in a stadium. more

Blue Man Group Launches New Vegas Production With DiGiCo In The Mix

The creative forces of Blue Man Group (BMG) have been working for two years to bring an all-new production to the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. This international entertainment phenomenon—one of many adaptations around the globe from Berlin to Boston—comprises a trio of blue men and an electrifying combination of music and inventive technology celebrating the more

Little Theatre, Big Sound: Ridgewood H.S. Upgrades Performance Venue

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Ridgewood High School in Ridgewood, New Jersey is a unique institution in that it has a long reputation of fine service to students providing many opportunities to further their performing arts interests. Founded in 1892, the school recently upgraded the audio system in its 250-seat intimate Little Theatre. Boulevard Professional (Ridgefield Park, NJ) was hired to design and install the new system that includes two NEXO GEO S1210 line arrays, one GEO S1230 for downfill, a NEXO 4×1 NXAMP, and a Yamaha LS9-32 digital audio console.

“Boulevard was contacted by Tim Whiting, a local resident and volunteer consultant to the New Players Company (NPC) Association, to review a system upgrade specification,” states James Cioffi, co-owner, Boulevard Pro. “After our first meeting, we were given the go ahead to design a solution for their space. Our goal was to provide a turnkey system upgrade that could cover the varied events held in the theatre.”

The new system was funded primarily through the tireless efforts of the NPC Association, the non-profit support arm of the New Players Company. NPC is dedicated to offering students the highest caliber of all aspects of theatre education, providing a wide range of experiences to students during their high school years. In continuous production for eleven months out of the year, New Players exposes students to plays and musicals of all genres and styles with a repertoire comprised of contemporary and classical that include challenging, complex works by artists ranging from Shakespeare to Sondheim.

Boulevard project manager, Bob Potanka, provided the NEXO system’s custom hanging solution and cable runs, interfacing with existing audio hardware. The company added eight 8-channel Shure SLX124/58 combo wireless mic systems for a total of sixteen Shure wireless units, and recycled the original line array as stage monitors flown left/right above the stage. “We used NEXO NS-1 software to model the sound system with assistance from Joe Rimstidt at Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems. The system was installed as predicted through the NS-1 software and sounds fantastic,” says Cioffi. In addition to the NEXO system and Yamaha LS9-32, a Middle Atlantic DWR 12-17 hanging wall rack was also installed.

At the completion of the installation, Boulevard conducted system training for staff and students. “The New Players Company at Ridgewood High School has already been enjoying sold-out shows, and response to the new sound system has been overwhelmingly positive,” notes Cioffi.

“Upgrading the sound system was one of a number of major improvements funded through the generous community support of our Capital Campaign,” added Meg Schaefer, Artistic Director of The New Players Company Association. “Both Boulevard and Yamaha did a phenomenal job to dramatically improve our venue.”

For more information on Boulevard Professional, visit www.blvdpro.com.

For more information on Yamaha and NEXO products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Yamaha Commercial Audio Brings Back ‘Test Drive’ Campaign

BUENA PARK, Calif.—In an aggressive move to offer the new Yamaha CL Digital Console to live sound engineers who may have yet to experience the power of the new console, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. has introduced its ‘Test Drive’ Campaign with participating Yamaha CL Commercial Audio dealers. The successful ‘Test Drive’ marketing campaign was first implemented over ten years ago.

Now through June 30, participating Yamaha CL dealers will offer the 72-hour CL Test Drive to live sound engineers free of charge (dealer may require deposit, shipping/delivery fees). The complete system includes a racked, two-unit RIO3224-D I/O, 150′ snake, and road case for a gig of their choosing. The system provides 72 inputs and 35 outputs.

“We have been extremely successful with our Yamaha Commercial Audio Training Seminars (YCATS) for the CL console around North America, but wanted to provide sound engineers an opportunity for a real-world mix experience to hear the amazing sound quality of the new CL console,” states Marc Lopez, Marketing Manager, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. “In this way, participating dealers who have accepted the ‘Test Drive’ challenge can offer the use of a CL console to engineers for a limited time without compromising their rental inventory.

For more information on the 72-hour CL Test Drive and to locate participating Yamaha Commercial Audio dealers, visit www.yamahaca.com/cltestdrive.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

WHEELER BROTHERS OUTFIT TEXAS STUDIO WITH A 32-CHANNEL API 1608

AUSTIN, TEXAS – JANUARY 2013: A notorious musical group has chosen an API 32-channel 1608 to outfit their unique studio in Texas. The Wheeler Brothers, a five-piece band hailing from Austin, Texas, plays heartfelt, soul-bending Southern rock suffused with the welcoming twang of indie country. The band works hard, playing a show roughly two out of every three days, and it has never played a hometown gig that was not completely sold-out. Their popularity has increased with the release of their debut album, Portraits, which has been met with critical acclaim. Summoning superhuman energy, the Wheeler Brothers are busy writing and recording their sophomore album between live dates at an expansive personal studio in Tarpley, Texas. A 32-channel API 1608 analog console is at the heart of the process, providing engineer Craig Lawrence with authentic sound and the immediacy of real knobs and faders for every track.

The 32-channel API 1608 is loaded with plenty of time-tested API processing. Twenty API 550b four-band EQs, twelve API 550A three-band EQs, and four API 560 graphic EQs sweeten the band’s instruments, not the least of which are their voices. “The board has that classic API sound… it’s open and punchy,” said Lawrence. “It has a big sound that’s really appropriate for the Wheeler Brothers. The EQ is precise but not clinical, and I love the way the bandwidth narrows as I go deeper into a cut.”

The 32-channel API 1608 interfaces with a 48-channel Pro Tools HD rig and a Studer A827 two-inch tape machine. An Endless Analog CLASP system mediates their interworking by recoding to and pulling from the tape with appropriate latencies. “One of the greatest things about having thirty-two analog API channels is that everything is right there in front of me,” said Lawrence. “I can just reach over and twist an EQ knob. The guys in the band can just lean in and turn things up or down. It’s very physical and intuitive.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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