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FSR Releases Product Guide – Holds Prices Steady

Woodland Park, NJ • FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, has released its latest Price Guide featuring dozens of new products offered at extremely attractive price points. The Guide includes the Company’s new and comprehensive series of HDMI products, elegant and secure iPad holders and chargers, and the hottest line-up of poke-though floor boxes available!

“Our economy and our industry are recovering,” said Jan Sandri, president, FSR,” and we want to do our part to help the recovery by holding our prices. The price of everything else seems to be going up and we want to help out by not doing the same.”

FSR’s comprehensive array of AV products has been significantly augmented. Expanded offerings take aim at professional installations requiring HDMI support with the recently launched Digital Video series comprised of high bandwidth HDMI extenders, switchers, scalars and distribution amplifiers. The Company is also supporting the proliferation of tablet use for digital signage applications with an easy-to-install enclosure that provides a graceful housing for iPads, and a PoE to USB charger that offers a power option for the enclosure. A new line of poke-through floor boxes offers solutions for both concrete and fire-rated floors.

The new Price Guide is available in paper, PDF, Excel and eZip formats. To request a copy, contact FSR at (800) 332-3771, or send an email to mailto:sales@fsrinc.com for more information.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

FSR complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and is a woman owned business. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information visit www.fsrinc.com.

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FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com
Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

Classic Church Gets Modern Update

Brigantine, NJ, September 2012….  Like most of New Jersey’s seaside communities, life on this resort island near Atlantic City is affected by the seasons. In the summer months, the sun seekers and beach lovers help to swell the congregation at St. Thomas the Apostle from 1,000 to more than 3,000 – well beyond what their existing sanctuary can handle. As Bobby Harper, VP of Sales at Egg Harbor-based ACIR Professional explains, the church came up with a creative solution.

“It’s an older structure, and it has some history, and they didn’t want to just tear it down and build something bigger,” says Harper. “So they opted to renovate the original building and also build an event center, which could handle the overflow, as well as other functions.”

The idea of connecting the events center to the sanctuary via audio and video was suggested early on, but a complex digital matrix with touch panels was simply not feasible. “We wanted to create a solution for them that would meet their needs without getting into complex and expensive networking,” Harper explains. In the end, a bit of creativity was all it took.

Using the seasonal population shifts to their advantage, the project was carried out in two phases. “The first summer, they used the (just-completed) events center as just that – a multi-purpose events center,” explains Harper. When fall approached, the event center was pressed into service as temporary sanctuary while the original 1920s-era building was then renovated, expanded, and tied in with the events center via audio and video feeds. “This summer they are finally enjoying it as an expansion space.”

The new sanctuary presented some challenging acoustics. “The sanctuary is pretty reflective inside,” says Harper. “They replaced the carpet with granite and marble, which increased the reverberance.” The addition of naves to the left and right of the altar also impacted the room’s acoustics.

“We decided to go with a distributed system,” Harper continues. “We didn’t want to energize the space with a large system, and we wanted clarity and consistency in coverage.”

The room’s audio includes a pair of Community VERIS 28 dual 8-inch systems at left and right of the altar, with another three VERIS 8 single 8-inch loudspeakers along each side. Yamaha 3500 and 5000 amplifiers power the system. “The church has a full praise band, with drummer, bass , keyboard, organ, a couple of violins and flute, and musicality was an important consideration,” says Harper. “We had been looking into the VERIS systems, and it seemed like a perfect fit.”

System drive and processing is covered by Community’s dSPEC™ networked loudspeaker processor. “The dSPEC is a great piece of gear,” says Harper. “We’re hardly pushing the amps – that’s the beauty of it. We use the dSPEC  to calibrate the limiters on the amps for maximum efficiency with the loudspeakers. And it’s very user friendly. I plugged it in, had no training on it, and had it sorted out in less than an hour.”

A Yamaha MG16 console is installed at the sanctuary’s mix position, with a Yamaha MG24 for the choir monitors. Sennheiser mics and wireless systems cover the choir loft, altar and musicians. A Sony PTZ70 camera captures the service and sends the signal via Ethernet to the event center. Space to the left and right of the altar have been converted into naves, each of which are served by a pair of MX10 compact monitors as wedges. “We custom-painted them to match the wall, and mounted them where the wall meets ceiling,” says Harper. “They look fantastic and they sound great.”

Over in the event center, another Yamaha MG16 console covers mix position. Connected pairs between each of the three consoles enables each to receive aux send audio feeds from the others. As Harper observes, “the system is not quite foolproof, but fortunately the church’s technical personnel are savvy enough not to route things into a feedback loop.”  A smaller 5.1 consumer system covers most of the room’s audio needs, and an Eiki LCWB42NA projector gets the Sony PTZ’s video feed to a ceiling-mounted DaLite screen.

As Harper points out, the event center was conceived from the outset as a multi-use venue, with flexibility a key requirement. “We installed audio I/O panels throughout the room, and they can easily configure the system for whatever event they’re holding. They can take the audio and video feed from the sanctuary, or they can host a power point demonstration, or watch a movie, or Monday night football,” he says. “It also made it easy to configure a portable church while the main sanctuary was under construction.”

While A/V interconnectivity is more often the province of contemporary churches, Harper says the implementation of it in this older, more traditional setting was worth it. “There were certainly some challenges in terms of running cable and working out logistics, but the end result is exactly what we wanted.”

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Community Professional Loudspeakers is a manufacturer and supplier of professional audio equipment.  Since 1968, Community has led the pro-audio industry with technological innovations which have become industry standards. Today, Community offers over 150 professional loudspeaker products, including installed loudspeaker systems, weather-resistant outdoor loudspeaker systems, ceiling loudspeakers, high level voice paging systems, and portable entertainment systems.  Visit www.communitypro.com for more information. 

 

ASHLY AMPLIFIERS PREFERRED IN THE MASKING SYSTEMS OF DYNASTY SOUND

HOUSTON, TEXAS – SEPTEMBER 2012: Leon Cortese is the owner of Dynasty Sound, a Houston, Texas-based company that specializes in providing sound masking solutions for buildings and offices both large and small. Cortese himself has been in the business for over forty years. Now his children and grandchildren work for Dynasty Sound, giving the company’s name a very literal spin. In recent years, Cortese has designed his masking systems using Ashly multi-channel amplification, often with integrated processing, citing its cost-effective pricing, bulletproof reliability, and flexible functionality, not to mention the affable Ashly staff.

“There are a few exceptions, but basically all we do is masking,” said Cortese. “Some people say that’s boring, but not to me. Every time someone says they need a masking system – which is common and becoming more common – my cash register rings!” Cortese has installed literally thousands of masking systems, and today, Dynasty Sound installs between 10,000 and 15,000 loudspeakers a year.

“In the old days, everybody had an office, which made masking much less critical than it is today,” explained Cortese. “Today, companies put people in cubicles, and all of their conversations float throughout that space. Masking serves two purposes. First, it alleviates the potential distractions caused by so many conversations, and second, it brings companies in line with privacy laws. It used to be that companies piped in music to create an ‘environment,’ but music is much more personal today than it was then. If you pipe music into an office of workers these days, you’re pretty much guaranteed to have a large fraction of them hating what you’re playing.” In contrast, employees won’t argue over whether you should play pink or brown noise.

When he started out in the business, the amps that Cortese worked with were all tube-based. He has thus witnessed the tremendous technological advances that led to the modern amplifier. “There are several reasons why we only install Ashly amplifiers,” said Cortese. “First and foremost, they make one of the few eight-channel, two-rack space amplifiers that deliver greater than 125 watts per channel. Using the Ashly ne8250.70pe allows me to install twice as many loudspeakers, and I can avoid buying and installing a separate DSP by using the ne8250.70pe’s optional onboard DSP. It is a tremendously cost-effective solution.” Cortese reports that his company has installed between 400 and 500 Ashly amplifiers and that only one of them didn’t work perfectly right out of the box. “The people at Ashly are wonderful,” he said. “They are very easy to work with and are always ready to lend assistance.”

Every job is different and comes with its own idiosyncrasies and nuances, but they also share many commonalities. For example, a well-distributed masking system requires a loudspeaker for approximately every 144 feet, and except for where architectural concerns prevent it, Cortese places the loudspeakers above the hung ceiling. “Instead of pointing downward like a normal speaker, they point up,” he said. “That way the noise fires up, hits structure, and rains down like a sprinkler.”

Dynasty Sound most recently completed masking systems in the new 28-story building of Hess Oil Company in Houston. Delivering masking to every office space required 28 eight-channel Ashly ne8250.70pe amps and 10 four-channel Ashly ne4250.70pe amplifiers. “For that job, we mostly used loudspeakers that were placed in the sheetrock,” Cortese said. “With Ashly’s optional DSP tools built right into the amps, it’s very quick to install them, give them a quick EQ curve, and rock and roll.”

Now well into his 60s, Cortese shows no signs of slowing his active lifestyle, and his enthusiasm for creating functional masking systems has never been greater.

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

SYMETRIX SOLUS 16 AUTOMIXES ST. ANTHONY CLARET CATHOLIC CHURCH

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: The modest sanctuary of St. Anthony Claret Catholic Church in Anaheim, California is of an airy and lovely modernist design. It was at the height of architectural fashion when it was built in the late 1950s and has again come into vogue in the new century. However, its unintelligible sound reinforcement system was hardly state-of-the-art when installed decades ago, and unlike a fine wine, time did not make it sound any better. As the church’s musical ambitions and spoken word requirements grew through the years, Reverend Rudolph Preciado contacted Newport Beach-based 7K Solutions to remedy the antiquated audio. Paul Dexter, owner of 7K Solutions, used an open-architecture Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 processor to create a system with twelve open inputs that could automix itself.

“Reverend Preciado will be retiring soon, and he wanted to do something great for the church before he left,” said Dexter. “The old sound reinforcement system was not performing well. An early-1980s rack of analog processing and amplification that had become ever-more ‘Frankensteined’ through the years drove a ceiling full of eight-inch, full-range loudspeakers.”

When it was constructed, the church used a charming pipe organ as the sole musical source and had only modest spoken word requirements. Today, the pipe organ is joined by a choir and, for some services, by a band that mixes itself on stage. Three microphones cover the choir, and Dexter replaced the band’s old mixer with an Allen & Heath MixWizard. Instead of a boundary mic at the altar, St. Anthony Claret now uses three wireless headset microphones for the priests, one wireless handheld microphone, and four optional podium microphones.

The Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 is an open-architecture, stand-alone unit that provides sixteen mic/line inputs and eight outputs. The routing, logic, and signal processing that Dexter programmed was quite involved and reflected the specific uses and contexts of each input. For instance, the band’s input will not duck for any other input. In contrast, all of the microphones will duck in response to the headset microphones. Dexter used Symetrix’ time-tested auto-gain algorithm on all of the microphones to ensure that individuals with both quiet and loud speaking voices receive ideal reinforcement.

“I started using Symetrix processing several years ago,” said Dexter. “I’m not the sort of person who’s into taking classes and certifications, so I appreciate how really intuitive SymNet Designer is. But things always come up, and I can call the Symetrix support staff any time and speak with someone who is knowledgeable and interested. My question gets answered and I move on. The SymNet Solus 16 was the perfect solution at St. Anthony Claret because I knew sixteen inputs would be ample and eight outputs was all that were needed. The open-architecture programming would allow me to customize the system for the very particular needs of this church.”

In addition to some clever processing inside the SymNet Solus 16, Dexter corrected the intelligibility problem with a generous helping of acoustical treatment and a single, nearly-point source loudspeaker cluster. “The walls, ceiling, floor, and pews are all quite reflective,” he said. “It was originally meant to amplify the pipe organ.” Dexter placed absorptive panels on the ceiling, sidewalls, and back wall, taking care to match colors so that the aesthetic of the church wouldn’t be compromised. He placed several panels on the ceiling near the central loudspeaker cluster so as to minimize intelligibility-degrading early reflections. The loudspeakers are Fulcrum Acoustic DX1265s, powered by Powersoft amplifiers.

Just a single Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote provides all of the user control for the system. Dexter fixed the sanctuary’s output volume and then provided ten steps of volume control for wireless microphones (as a group), the podium microphones (as a group), the choir microphones (as a group), and the band’s on-stage mixer. Additional menu pages provide output volume for the choir monitor (which contains all content except the choir mics) and the cry room. Behind the scenes, the SymNet Solus 16 provides additional zone control for the foyer and each main loudspeaker. Zoning out the loudspeaker cluster allowed Dexter to shade and tune each element to deliver even coverage from the front seat to the back wall.

“Taken together, the system is very effective,” said Dexter. “It sounds great, and they don’t need an audio tech on hand. Reverend Preciado tested the system with us, and he walked all around the room, overjoyed by how clear everything sounded. And it’s so easy to use that we never had to provide a formal training session. The Reverend just pushed some buttons on the ARC-2e, and he understood exactly how it works.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

IC Live Turns The Tables For Oslo’s Modern Church

Oslo, Norway, September 2012… The Sofiemyr church in Oslo is a striking modern building, with bare brick walls, a tiled floor and wooden ceiling. Light pours in from a huge stained glass window and other windows in the corners.

The audio solution, supplied by Benum A/S, is equally striking, with a pair of inverted IC Live arrays, flown from the ceiling alongside the matching subwoofers, above a small performance stage. The technique has been used before – England’s Stage Audio Services was possibly first to experiment with it, flying a pair of IC Live arrays upside down at trim height for a standup comedy tour of UK theatres, which allowed the beams to be angled at the ground floor audience as well as the balconies. But this is almost certainly the world’s first permanent installation to use the configuration, which has many benefits in a tall space.

Geir Kristoffersen, manager of the consulting department of COWI for Acoustics and Electro Acoustics, Sound and Vision, who designed the system for the church and frequently mixes it, explains: “This room is a cube, essentially, 16 by 16 metres with a height of about 12 metres, so it’s very interesting acoustically. But it’s turned 90 degrees so that you get some angles towards the speakers.” Slots in the ceiling provide low frequency absorption.

Although on the face of it a highly reverberant space, the actual reverb time is just 1.7 seconds with a very well controlled low end. “But still, 1.7 seconds is significant,” he points out. However, the bare brick walls are an inevitable challenge in view of their capability to deliver slapback echo to the stage.

The church is also equipped with a pipe organ, which is quite frequently played together with a band and a grand piano, as well as a movable pulpit, which is taken out during modern-style worship services.

“The loudspeaker system is flown in the form of a pair of Renkus-Heinz IC Lives,” says Kristoffersen. “We’re very happy with the sound of it. In fact, I’ve never worked with a system that’s so easy and quick to get good sound out of,” he says.

“It works exceptionally well for this kind and size of room and with such a wide variety of music. Together with the choir, we often have a worship team of eight people singing with their vocal microphones. Last Sunday, for example, the choir was seated directly in front of the loudspeakers and I had my measurement system at the desk and I was pumping 90db A weighted but flat out it was giving 101dB. Yet there was no issue with feedback,” he continues.”With these digitally steerable arrays we get tightly controlled beams, which allow us to deflect the sound away from these noisy brick walls,” he explains, adding, “While there is some reverberation, of course, if you shoot straight into these walls then you’d have a big problem with slapback.”

The system is configured with two beams from each IC Live, one pair aimed at the front part of the congregation, the others at the rear. The result, says Kristoffersen, “is that the sound is completely uniform wherever you are standing or sitting.”

“What I like the most about this system – and I’ve worked with good systems all my life – is that because it’s a true line array and not a banana hang it creates a cylindrical wave, which means that it doesn’t excite the room as much as a traditional three-box system, which would have been our obvious alternative,” he says, and adds, “Another thing is that, with a choir, the choir bench is high, which means the microphones are right in front of the loudspeakers, yet we have never had any feedback problems. Because it’s so even sounding across the frequency spectrum you don’t get response spikes which then become the problem, especially with the choir-mic scenario.”

Tuning is performed using both RHAON and in an Allen & Heath IDR8 DSP processor with an Allen & Heath T112 control surface, allowing it to be controlled from two different places.

A small delay system provides extra coverage into a small annexe at the rear and in the side halls, using CFX-61R cabinets, again controlled over RHAON and CobraNet. These are matched with six CF-121M cabinets for monitors, which can also be deployed as a portable PA in the larger side room of the church, or outside during the summer.

He continues, “It’s also very good for the monitoring because despite it being so loud up there it doesn’t feedback even when it’s rock’n'roll loud. Also,” he adds, “we work a lot with the grand piano and, for me, a grand piano has to sound good. If the grand piano doesn’t sound good then it’s nearly worse than having the drum kit not sounding right, but even when we’re pushing rock’n'roll levels and there’s a monitor there next to it, if you do push it to feedback it’s not high-end feedback but a just rumble, which tells you that the total room is just playing too loud. It’s very impressive and we’re extremely happy.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

Community’s Distributed Design Series Now in Basic Black

Chester, PA, September 2012…  Community’s Distributed Design Series of in-ceiling loudspeakers has been expanded to include a standard black version of its flagship D6 model.

The new D6-B provides the same exceptionally high quality sound with very wide, uniform coverage as all Distributed Design Series ceiling systems, making it ideal for nightclubs, bars, restaurants, or any other application requiring a black ceiling loudspeaker. The face-only assembly and optional accessories, including Face Adapter Ring and Can Adapter/Trim Ring are also available in matching black finishes.

The D6-B is a true coaxial loudspeaker, with a compression driver concentrically located so that high frequencies emerge through the center of the low-frequency driver via a precisely contoured Tru-Phase™ HF waveguide. This provides consistent, wide dispersion up to 16kHz.

Features of the D6-B include Community’s innovative Drop-Stop™ and Twist-Assist™ tabs, to make installation easier and faster. The Drop-Stop™ feature provides spring-loaded legs to support the back-can while the installer tightens the clamps. If the loudspeaker back-cans are pre-installed, the product’s Twist-Assist™ locking allows the baffle assembly to be self-supporting while fastening the screws to the back-can.

The D6-B can be used in 8 Ohm or 70V/100V configurations and optimum system configuration can be achieved quickly and easily using Community’s free FORECASTER HD Ceiling Distributed System Design Software.

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Community Professional Loudspeakers is a manufacturer and supplier of professional audio equipment.  Since 1968, Community has led the pro-audio industry with technological innovations which have become industry standards. Today, Community offers over 150 professional loudspeaker products, including installed loudspeaker systems, weather-resistant outdoor loudspeaker systems, ceiling loudspeakers, high level voice paging systems, and portable entertainment systems.  Visit www.communitypro.com for more information. 

 

 

Iconyx Breathes New Life into Eden Resort Courtyard

Lancaster, PA – September 2012…  Champagne Sunday Brunch in the Eden Courtyard at the Best Western Eden Resort & Suites has become a local area tradition, attracting patrons with an ever-changing menu that draws from the region’s finest seasonal ingredients. But while the Courtyard is known for its dining and social events, the room’s acoustics have long made it a challenge to attract speaking engagements. With its 40-foot-high glass ceiling, hard stone floor and hard walls, the room’s reverberation made intelligibility nearly non-existent.

“This is a gorgeous space and great for social events – cocktail receptions and so forth,” says Stephen Sikking, managing partner, Eden Resort & Suites. “But when a speaker wanted to present something to the entire room, it was very problematic to articulate so that people could hear intelligibly.”

Bob Bickelman, senior audio designer with Manheim, PA-based Clair Brothers Audio Systems, Inc., agrees. ”The reverb time is pretty long,” says Bickelman. In addition to a massive water fountain at one end of the room, he says, ”There is a rather large vaulted skylight running across the middle of the room that creates some very strange reflections.”

To address the room’s acoustical challenges, Clair Brothers selected the Renkus-Heinz Iconyx IC24-R-II digitally controlled column loudspeaker system, installing the arrays in the two front corners of the courtyard. The ability to precisely steer the Iconyx array’s multiple sonic beams had an immediate impact on the intelligibility factor. “Being able to direct the sound downward and away from the walls was huge,” says Bickelman.

Bickelman selected the Iconyx system based on both on price and performance. “We had previous experience with the Iconyx,” he explains. “Not long ago I did a synagogue down in Cherry Hill, NJ, and liked the way they performed and their ease of use. And they certainly cost less than some alternatives.”

Using Renkus-Heinz’s RHAON CobraNet-based DSP software, individual Iconyx elements can be shaped and aimed with programmable precision, lowering or raising the acoustic center as desired.

The newly installed system at Eden Resort & Suites also includes several Shure wireless microphones and is managed by a Symetrix DSP automixing and processing system with ARC (Adaptive Remote Control) programmable wall panels.

“Iconyx has been a wonderful addition to our courtyard,” comments Sikking. “Now we can take a 400- to 500-person room and actually use it for an event that includes speaking engagements. Because of the Iconyx system we are now able to be on individual company lists, social lists, and so forth for speaking events. These speakers have made a dramatic difference.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

Bar Sport Gets a Winning Community Solution

Maidenhead, UK, September 2012… Oxfordshire-based RealSound and Vision has completed the installation of a Community sound system for Cedar Sports Management Ltd. at Bar Sport in Maidenhead, Berkshire.

The new Bar Sport venue is located at Grenfell Island, a popular area in the town for cafés, bars, restaurants and the cinema. “Being a sports venue, the timeline for their scheduled opening was pretty much dictated by Euro 2012,” commented RealSound’s Managing Director, David Nibbs. “This defined a tight schedule for the sound and dance floor lighting to be designed and installed, but with a decisive client and good service from our suppliers we were able to complete the installation on time.”

RealSound designed the system using Community ceiling loudspeakers to maintain clear sightlines to the bar’s 42 video screens in the low-ceiling venue. “With high ambient noise levels we chose Community for their high efficiency, intelligibility and well defined coverage” said Nibbs. “Bar Sport has four zones over two levels and required 15 Community D6 ceiling loudspeakers to provide optimum coverage. Their high efficiency meant we only needed to tap each loudspeaker at 15W and could comfortably drive the system with a t&mSystems Project120.4P four zone power amplifier and still have ample headroom.”

“The more challenging area from a design perspective was the central dance floor,” Nibbs continues. “With the ceiling height and sightline issue, traditional large box loudspeakers were unacceptable. I discussed this with Stuart Cunningham of CUK Audio, the Community distributor. He came up with an unusual but ideal proposal, suggesting four Community MX10 monitor loudspeakers, ceiling mounted at each corner of the dance floor. This provided a perfect solution: With their mounting brackets, the MX10s were easy to ceiling mount and presented minimal intrusion into the room. The loudspeakers could be accurately directed to the dance floor, minimizing reflected sound both within the venue, and to the surrounding residential areas. And the MX10 uses the same family of drivers as the D6, giving consistent sound quality throughout the venue.”

The dance floor system is completed by two Community VLF212 subs for high power low frequency energy. A Powersoft M28Q four channel amplifier drives the dance floor system. System control is via a DBX ZonePro 1261 central processor, with four DBX ZC-8 remote control wall plates providing user flexibility.

The venue is additionally used for both live music events and DJ entertainment. In the DJ booth,RealSound provided a Denon DN-X1100 DJ mixer and two Denon DN-SC3900 media players. For continuous music playback throughout the day, they also installed a Tascam CD200i CD player with integral iPod dock plus a Numark iDec as a second iPod docking and control facility.

A very compact and discreet lighting system was also installed around the dance floor, consisting of six Chauvet ColorBand Pix RGB LED battens and two Chauvet DMF10 LED moonflowers, operated via a Martin Professional 2510 lighting controller.

“The Community loudspeakers allowed us to achieve a powerful foreground system very discreetly, and the client is suitably impressed with the result,”concluded Nibbs. “Bar Sport has chosen a bumper sporting year to open this new venue and I’m pleased we’ve delivered a system which will enable their customers to enjoy the many upcoming events to the fullest.”

Kareem Naaman, Managing Director of Cedar Sports Management Ltd., added, “I had a very tight deadline to meet and David and his team were able to react and meet the deadline and the budget I had given them without compromising on quality. I knew what I wanted to achieve for the venue and RealSound was able to suggest some very creative ideas which have given me a great sound and lighting system for my sports bar.”

ALTINEX ANNOUNCES TNP151 / TNP151C TABLETOP INTERCONNECT BOXES

**** Photo: Altinex TNP151 Interconnect box ****

Brea, CA – September 2012… Altinex, a leading manufacturer of Signal Management Solutions®, is pleased to announce the availability of the TNP151 and TNP151C (custom) Interconnect Boxes to the ever-expanding line of Tilt ‘N Plug interconnect offerings. Available in both standard and custom configurations, the TNP151 and TNP151C interconnect boxes offer convenient, one touch access to network and AC power connections—making the tabletop connection point attractive for any boardroom or conference room table. more

Allstage Pro Adds Yamaha Networking System to Extron’s THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon

BUENA PARK, CA–THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon is Anaheim’s premier dining and country music venue. A restaurant and upscale saloon with separate entrances, it comprises 20,000 square feet of restaurant, wine cellar, live country music, and dancing.

THE RANCH is the longtime dream and vision of Andrew Edwards, president and owner of Extron Electronics, a leading manufacturer of professional AV system integration products for over 29 years. A passion for food, wine, country music and dancing prompted Edwards to create THE RANCH Restaurant & Saloon. In developing a live music venue like THE RANCH Saloon, all sound quality and design was handpicked by Edwards. Allstage Pro (Santa Ana) owner, Ian Ingram worked closely with Edwards and Extron Electronic’s Application Engineer Consultant, John Fish, in selecting an elaborate EtherSound networking system in the saloon.

The system includes two Yamaha M7CL digital audio consoles, using the M7CL control surface at front of house connected to a Yamaha NAI network interface, AD8HR mic pre amp, and EtherSound cards, all running off a Yamaha DME64 digital mixing engine.

“Andrew wanted us to design and install a system that would be both analog and digital, user friendly, acceptable for most riders, and one that he could be proud of,” said Ingram. “The idea of using the M7CL control surface to NAI and AD8HR gives us the best of both worlds.”

Allstage Pro also designed and integrated a comprehensive lighting system to provide a wide variety of lighting scenes and visual effects for featured concert acts. A total of 83 lighting fixtures, the majority of which are LED based, were installed in conjunction with the elaborate electrical infrastructure.

Ingram said using Yamaha’s EtherSound networking system was essential in creating a great system with an amazing light show that would make everyone say “Wow!”

For more information on THE RANCH, please visit www.theranch.com.

For more information on Allstage Pro, visit www.allstagepro.com.

For more information on Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

Photo ID: L to R: House engineer Mark Bjork and Allstage Pro’s Ian Ingram

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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