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QSC AcousticDesign Loudspeakers Reinforce the Ambience at Atlantic City’s New $2.4 Billion Revel Casino-Resort

Revel CasinoNearly 570 QSC Loudspeakers Deliver Consistent Coverage and High-Quality Audio to Gaming Floor

Atlantic City, NJ (Oct 18, 2012) — Montreal-based Scéno Plus, renowned for its theatre design work in Las Vegas, Canada, and around the world, recently completed a major, multi-venue project at Revel, the new $2.4 billion casino-resort at the north end of Atlantic City’s famed boardwalk. Scéno Plus was the lead designer for all of the entertainment spaces at the Revel, including the Revelry casino floor, where the company designed, specified and optimized nearly 570 QSC Audio Products AcousticDesign Series ceiling- and surface-mount loudspeakers.

Scéno Plus was responsible for the design of two large, multipurpose, transformable venues, several bars and various interconnecting spaces at Revel. The resort, which fronts onto the beach, covers 20 acres and, at 47 stories, is the tallest building in Atlantic City.
In a break with traditional casino design, Revelry’s 130,000-sq.-ft. gaming floor includes windows offering panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean. As daylight fades, audiovisual, lighting and interior design elements dynamically change the ambiance of what are referred to as “neighborhoods” on the floor as the night’s entertainment begins. “The client wanted to have a high-end theatrical experience on the gaming floor,” explains Simon Léonard, AV Designer, Scéno Plus.
The constant-voltage distributed audio system on the Revelry casino floor includes 274 QSC AcousticDesign AD-CI52ST ceiling speakers, which employ 5.25-inch LF transducer, a 1-inch titanium dome tweeter and a ported enclosure for greater low frequency extension; 170 QSC AcousticDesign AD-S52T two-way surface mount speakers, also incorporating a 5.25-inch woofer and 1-inch neodymium tweeter; and 125 QSC AcousticDesign AD-C81Tw ceiling-mount 8-inch subwoofers, providing additional low-frequency extension.
“The AcousticDesign line was a great choice, because the client really wanted to have fullness and richness of both the high-end and the low-end,” says Léonard. “So we needed a product that could suit that large, broad spectrum, and would also be really comfortable to listen to.”
Despite the significant differences in ceiling height and of finish materials between one neighborhood and the next, the QSC AcousticDesign products were remarkably easy to dial in, according to Léonard. “The voicing of the whole line is very nice. You go from a low ceiling area to an open part of the casino, where AVI/SPL & CALVI worked hard to maintain a certain level of consistency in the trim heights, but the voicing is really similar. You could also get more of the same response between the ceiling and the surface mount versions, which is very nice. We were really astonished at how we could easily, without eq’ing for hours, get the same response everywhere.” He continues, “We were surprised to hear how the AD speakers sounded right out of the box, off-, as well as, on-axis. You can really get something that is consistent throughout the whole coverage area.”
The speaker system on the casino floor also needed to be of high quality, capable of acting as an extension of the sound systems in several of the featured spaces. These include The Social, a two-story, high-energy show-bar in the center of the gaming floor that hosts a variety of events, including musical guests; the Digipit, an area with a raised runway, two raised stages and space for acrobatic and aerial performances; and the Immersive Dome, an overhead, 360-degree digital video projection installation. “There are a couple of features like that on the Revelry floor that the system can take its source from,” says Léonard. “So we put a lot of attention into how we were going to zone the system, just to make sure that we would be able to maintain something that makes sense with the architecture.”
The changing environments and various show elements are preprogrammed and played out through show control automation. “So the floor manager at any time can override the timeline and select something at the catwalk, or later if there’s something happening in the bar and they want to extend the experience onto the floor, they are always able to do so. That’s why we had to provide a sound reinforcement system that would reflect or extend the quality of a live event. It’s more or less an extension of a concert system,” he elaborates.
Scéno Plus collaborated on the Revel project with Claude Ricard and Marc St-Jacques of SF Marketing, the QSC distributor for Canada. “We had the opportunity to do a mock up in their facility, so we could really compare what EASE Address was saying to compare it with the real life installation, or as close as we could get it. Those guys were really a big help,” says Léonard. We were really happy about how it turned out.” More importantly, he comments, “The client is really pleased with the results.”

About QSC Audio
QSC Audio Products, LLC is a leading manufacturer of power amplifiers, loudspeakers, digital signal processors, digital sound transport, and network audio for professional audio systems worldwide. qsc.com

Dual Yamaha DM2000s Used at Hofstra Presidential Debate

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Hofstra University on Long Island (NY) was the site chosen for the second of three Presidential debates between President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Held on Tuesday, October 16, Hofstra previously hosted the 2008 debate between President-elect Obama and John McCain. Audio production was provided by On Stage Audio (OSA) Las Vegas.

Michael Abbott, owner of All Ears, Inc. (Los Angeles) chose a pair of Yamaha DM2000 digital consoles for audio control. “The dual DM2000s were chosen for the Presidential debate specifically to provide two separate audio streams,” states Abbott. “Size and audio I/O capabilities also played a key role in the set up. We routed six Yamaha AD8HR 8-channel preamps to eight groups: four for the house mix and four for the broadcast pool truck.”

In addition, Abbott said Dugan-MY16 cards were inserted for the 24 Town Hall participant mics along with moderator and candidate microphones.

For more information on All Ears, Inc., e-mail michaelsound@earthlink.net.

For more information on Yamaha Commercial Audio products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

DiGiCo Captures Electrifying Tedeschi Trucks Band Live On 2-CD Set

Brilliant musicianship and roof-raising performances characterize the Tedeschi Trucks Band’s live concerts. The perennially touring, 11-piece ensemble covers myriad genres from Delta blues and Rock to Funk and Jazz and is led by husband and wife team singer-guitarist Susan Tedeschi and slide guitar virtuoso Derek Trucks. So it made perfect sense for the group to follow-up their Grammy awarded debut release with a live testament to their incendiary shows. The two-disc Everybody’s Talkin’ marks the TTB’s first anniversary and features highlights recorded last fall while the band toured behind Revelator. Described as “a warm-sounding, ‘organic’ concert document, DiGiCo’s SD8 console played a major role in the recording of that CD under the discerning ear of monitor engineer Bobby Tis. The group’s touring audio kit (supplied by SK Systems) also features an SD10 (replacing a DiGiCo D5) at Front of House with Brian Speiser.

“For that 2011 tour,” Tis recalls, “I brought out a rack of Neve and API outboard preamps and a few sweet vintage compressors. We used them for some of our most important channels and fed the pre amps line-in to the DiGiCo stage rack. I recorded to two systems simultaneously throughout the whole tour. I had Cubase running on my MacBook Pro through a MADIface as my backup recorder, which I also used for playback for the band and virtual soundcheck. The main recorder (the one we mixed the album from) was a Joeco BBR-64 MADI. The Joeco recorder integrated seamlessly with the DiGiCo and gave us 64 recordable tracks via MADI. It was easy to use, stable, and amazingly. Neither recorder crashed the whole tour and the tracks sounded great. Having the DiGiCo for these recordings made the project very easy… I was even able to assign a stereo aux to a pair of tracks and print a rough mix along with the multitracks as the show was going on. I would do it again the same way.”

Speiser uses his SD10 in tandem with an RME MADIFace into a MacBook Pro running Logic to track the occasional show for virtual soundcheck purposes. Most shows, however, he’s recording a board mix through that same setup as a reference for the band to listen to.

Both Tis and Speiser are no strangers to DiGiCo and the decision to carry the consoles on the newly minted tour in 2011 was an easy decision to make. Both had been introduced to the DiGiCo platform on D1s and D5s while working with SK Systems during the early 2000s, and Speiser used one or the other on tours with They Might Be Giants, 311 and with the Indigo Girls—where he moved from a D1 to an SD8 and finally an SD8/24 to get the most “bang for my buck while keeping a small footprint,” Speiser says. “Having been on DiGiCo consoles for a long time, I’ve really enjoyed the sonic differences as the processing technology and power have gotten more intense. Once I moved over from the D series consoles to the SD consoles, going backwards just wasn’t an option. I definitely find the DiGiCo SD consoles to be the best sounding digital desks available. If you use the A>D converters to their full potential and convert the right amount of signal, you can really achieve great rich sounds. As an analogue connoisseur, it’s very important to me that you can’t hear anything ‘digital’-sounding in my mix and the quality of converters in DiGiCo gear, along with its floating point 40-Bit Super FPGA, achieve that more so than any other digital desks I’ve mixed on.”

Speiser says the flexibility and dynamic EQ/multiband comp capabilities are the most rewarding features of the SD10. “It helps to be able to put any sort of fader or output in any slot I want. I can keep everything I need in front of me and move channels I don’t need as often. Having an 11-piece band, you really need to make the most out of the space you have, and I can personalize the console exactly as I see fit. The dynamic EQ is a great way to maintain the life of a vocal or instrument and still pull certain trouble frequencies out only when they start to get out of control. One other feature that has come in quite handy on the SD10 is the multiple User Defined Keys (macros). With so much going on on our stage, and musicians moving around to different mics, I’m able to use the macros to change what mics show up on what channels, allowing me to keep everybody’s settings the same for their voice or instrument no matter where on stage they decide to play.”

As for outboard gear, he keeps it to a bare minimum for consistency’s sake. “It was important to me when I started working with TTB to try and keep everything in the box so that I can advance to have an SD8 or SD10 on fly dates and still be able to keep my session sounding the same. On our tour, the only piece of gear I have with me is a Dolby Lake Processor on my mix outputs so that I can walk around and EQ each venue on a tablet computer. I plan to try adding a Waves SoundGrid in the future, but we haven’t had the chance to implement it just yet.”

Over in monitor world, Tis says his favorite features on the SD8 are the console’s routing flexibility and functionality, as well as the snapshots, which help him to achieve consistency. “I’m mixing the band through post-fade groups for the most part. Everyone gets themselves pre-fade off their channels and everything else in the mix is coming in post-fade through groups. This allows me to mix the show off the main faders and have the fader movement translate proportionally in everyone’s mix simultaneously. I’ve been using this technique for a while, but it’s definitely the best it has ever been with the SD8.

“Being able to have multiple versions (MultiPatch) of the same input to be used in different mixes on the stage, on the fader bank layers, and the flexibility of the mixing surface all help me keep those additional faders organized and streamlined,” he adds. “I also really like having the macros even though I’m using them for not so exciting stuff. I have them set up as buttons that I’d like to have that are not built-in on the surface, for instance, ‘Gain tracking On/Off’ for all channels, ‘Fader Flip On/Off,’ ‘Save Session,’ and I have a couple assigned to specific channel mutes and mute groups. I don’t use a lot of snapshots, but I do have a few for certain tunes where our vocalists or keyboard/flute player moves to different positions on the stage.

“I’m also a huge fan of DiGiCo’s snapshot scope, which is second to none in my opinion. The few that I’m using, which are scoped to see aux-send level and mute, have helped me to solve some issues of consistency I’ve had in the past when our vocalist or keys/flute player change positions on stage. Also, on some legs of the tour the band will do some stripped-down blues tunes, which is pretty much an ‘audio scene change.’ The snapshots have helped me keep that portion of the show very consistent without having to flip though every mix and make adjustments. I’m also a big fan of the Multiband Compressors and Dynamic EQ’s, they really help me to keep the most musical parts of my lead instruments in focus on a stage with 11 musicians, 10 wedge mixes and 2 drum fills!”

And the band has certainly noticed the forward progression of their audio production since bringing the DiGiCo SD’s out on this tour. “We’ve had several positive comments about the consistency of the sound of our show from the band,” relays Tis. “In monitors, I’ve heard certain band members feel great because they can musically communicate with each other, which, I believe, is because of how the SD8 allows me to mix the show. With Brian at FOH with his SD10, too, there’s been a plethora of rave reviews from fans and critics, but the band has especially noticed that they are getting their musical statements across to the audience in a very focused, conducive, and high-fidelity manner night after night, and overall the audiences have become more energetic because of this. The consoles have helped us raise the bar for this organization. In my opinion the DiGiCo SD series consoles are, hands down, the best sounding and most flexible digital consoles on the market. I’ve used almost all of the digital consoles that are out there over the years and not one of them is capable of out performing my SD8 for its application with this band. This console makes my job fun everyday because I know I can do anything I need to. We are grateful, loyal and proud DiGiCo users.”

Indianapolis Traders Point Christian Church Upgrades Audio System & Gets A Windfall of Additional Features & Benefits

Traders Point Christian Church in Indianapolis, Indiana has a rich history dating back to humble beginnings with a handful of worshipers in 1834. The congregation now totals close to 4,000 members. With an eye (and ear) to updating its audio footprint and wireless technology, Technical Systems Engineer Brent Whetstine—with the help of Daryl Cripe and Nate Krause of Church Solutions Group—set out on a mission to upgrade TPCC’s main mix and monitor/IE consoles in its newest Worship Center, where the church relocated to in 2007. With the addition of a pair of DiGiCo SD10s and SD racks set up for 96 inputs and 48 outputs, not only did TPCC get a world-class and expandable system that will allow them to grow in the coming years, but also a pristine-sounding clarity to its services. Additionally, it offered its volunteer staff of engineers an educational learning tool.

“We had outgrown our previous consoles both in channel count as well as output, so we had started looking specifically for consoles that doubled our existing capabilities,” Whetstine explains. “Our philosophy was that if we’re going to pay a premium for the next level of digital console, there was no sense in only gaining 12 more inputs, or only eight more outputs, especially knowing that our worship team and its needs would be growing over the next few years. We had looked at the SD8 and really liked the package, but felt like we still needed to double our channel and output capability. When we saw the advertisement in Live Sound magazine for the ‘New SD10 at 96/48,’ we said, ‘That’s our console!’

“We knew we were getting a better console, and we knew of DiGiCo’s reputation for creating stellar-sounding products. What we didn’t bank on was that the volunteers would take to it so quickly. Our volunteer team felt it was easier to get around on than our previous boards and have felt right at home from day one. More than that, we’re constantly in awe at the sound quality. The comment ‘Wow, that sounds great,’ or ‘Wow, I didn’t know it would do that,’ is heard pretty often these days around here.”

The main SD10 console interfaces with a Yamaha DME64 processor by way of AES/EBU, to drive a large LCR array of HPV MAD A-9s, SB412s, MTM-1s and VLFs, all powered by Yamaha PCN series amps. The monitor desk feeds 16 stereo mixes (10 of which are PSM900, with more to be added), two wired mixes for bass and drums offering better low end, and four wireless IEM systems TPCC owned prior to the upgrade.

Some of the system’s feature set proved helpful for their needs—for example, smart keys that allow the operator to easily make quick mix changes like effects and sub boosts without having to hunt down channels. The programmability of scenes with specific recallable functions is way more in-depth than their previous board, allowing for very detailed scene recall per song, and even within songs for dramatic shifts of effects and mix details. And the volunteer engineers cite Snapshot Notes and Virtual Sound Check as veritable blessings.

“I found the EQ to be both subtle and musical,” says Whetstine. “We’re able to do very narrow boosts in upper regions that previously would have been piercing, but on this board, it just makes things stand out of the mix while still sounding natural even when the boost might look wildly dramatic. Minor tweaks of a dB or less are immediately heard, but not sonically noticeable. Even when cuts of 9db or more are applied, it still sounds proper with no odd ‘carved’ or unnatural sounds. Everything just sounds right.

“Also, the effects presets are just perfect,” he adds. “Our mixes, even in our auditorium, sound more live and energetic with stock programs, versus sounding like a concert hall—or very distant-sounding. The stock reverbs just sound like natural ambience without drawing attention to the effect itself. We’ve also upgraded our native plug-ins to TDM. We’re using the Waves’ Blackface CLA-1176 plug-ins on nearly everything, including vocals, drums, bass, acoustics, etc. Having it in-line and not compressed brings a really familiar quality to the vocals. We’re also using a PuigTec EQ on the bass and a PuigChild compressor on guitars. We’ve only purchased these few, as they were what I was familiar with from my time learning audio in Nashville. My next focus will be to step into some mastering plug-ins to help bulletproof audio feeds to recording, video and building systems. I’m also really turning over the idea of some of the different channel strips that are available for plug-ins. We’ve worked for several years with an end goal of developing a sonic signature for the music we produce, and I’m curious if some of those might be a step in that direction. It’s kind of nebulous and evolving, but when you have really cool tools like this available, it makes it really energizing to always be deconstructing what we do to try and make it better.”

Team FOH Main - (L-R) Jeff Johnston (volunteer), Jonathan Ficklin (Vol) Levy Stout (Vol), Mike Blackburn (Vol), Wes Fahlsing (Vol), Brent Whetstine (Technical Systems/Staff)

Another unexpected bonus the console brought to TPCC: it’s been a tool for educational growth for its volunteers, who now have the ability to record rehearsals and tweak the mixes after the fact. TPCC is currently set up to record 48 channels through an RME MADI card on a Logic Audio system, and Whetstine says they hope to purchase a second card to be able to record a full 96 channels without having to juggle inputs between racks. These recordings are currently used for training and virtual soundcheck purposes.

“The training portion is an unbelievable windfall for a church,” he says. “Being able to track our rehearsals and then work on our mixes without the pressure of other people in the room has not only made our mix engineers incredibly good, it has turned out to be an incredible teaching tool. We can bring all of our audio team members in and talk through ideas of channel setup and EQ without the need for a band to do this with. As a church worker and leader of volunteers, I can’t highlight this feature enough for its ability to aid training both new and existing volunteers in a safe manner that had previously been impossible. Also, the ability for a volunteer to work on his mix in a calm environment—some of whom spend up to four to five hours post-rehearsal—away from the stress of a fast-paced rehearsal has done wonders for our engineers, increasing the confidence of their work and the quality of their mixes. In short, the engineers are doing better work and enjoying the final execution more. It also makes Sunday morning that much more enjoyable in that they’re fully prepared, and completely relaxed.”

The SD10s, in addition, solved another sonic challenge. “Being so clean and comfortable to listen to, this console has bought us a lot of grace with our congregation, which has a broad range of ages,” Whetstine confesses. “What I mean by this is that we can be powerful and punchy-sounding without feeling like it’s loud. This was really evident with our previous console in that it was not as smooth as this console, so it sometimes sounded loud even at low volumes. The clarity within the mix is incredible. On some consoles, you can really only put a few things at the forefront of the mix, and the rest of the band is kind of part of the ‘bed.’ On the SD10s, we can hear way back into the mix, which not only makes it easier to pick out individual instruments, but has really kept us on our toes to be better at what we do because the average person can now clearly hear whether the mix is on or not. This board sounds so clean and nice! It’s exposed what we refer to as our ‘club engineer disease’—all of the bad habits developed mixing around sonic inadequacies of other gear we’ve been exposed to, or unrefined work that is the result of a narrow window for the mix to be heard through. There is so much space and subtlety to everything about this console, it’s like you can hear in HD and 3D at the same time. We’re able to mix with more power and volume, allowing the music to really connect with and engage the congregation, whilst not being perceived as being louder. In fact, we’ve even had comments like, ‘I’m glad you finally turned it down,’ when in reality we’re easily 4-6 dB louder!”

One trick he’s happy to impart regards working with the choir: “I’ve found that by assigning the four choir mics to both individual channels and as stereo pairs, I can dial the spread on the stereo pair to Wide and then mix it back in with the original four mics. This makes the choir sound as big as a house with literally no hard work of EQing stuff out. Also, using auxes on faders for monitors while having the knobs follow the selected mix makes it very easy for the monitor engineer to dial up an instrument with a hand on the pan knob and never having to take his eyes off the stage. The pan knob for that instrument is always the pan knob no matter what mix you’ve selected.”

All in all, the SD10 acquisition has offered TPCC incredible benefits for both staff and congregation alike. “The DiGiCo consoles have made us better at what we do in general,” Whetstine says, “and offer our worshipers a message that is sonically clear—and ultimately that is our greatest goal.”

WORXAUDIO TECHNOLOGIES LOUDSPEAKERS DEPLOYED AT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF LENOIR

**** Photo: Buck Roberts ****

Lenoir NC – October 2012 … Recognizing that audio and video capabilities are well-entrenched in contemporary worship services, First Baptist Church of Lenoir decided the time had come to upgrade their sanctuary’s A/V facilities. While services are presently traditional in nature, church management wanted the new A/V system to have the versatility to handle a wide range of services and, for that matter, the occasional music program. Their previous sound reinforcement system suffered from poor speech intelligibility, phasing issues, and inconsistent dispersion. Determined to correct the situation, the church ultimately deployed a new sound system drawn from the catalog of Greensboro, NC-based WorxAudio Technologies. more

Community Expands Distributed Design Family with DA6

Chester, PA – October 2012...  Community Professional Loudspeakers has introduced the newest member of their highly acclaimed Distributed Design Series. The new DA6 is a high-output, full-range architectural surface-mount loudspeaker with an elegant, sconce-like form factor and contemporary styling designed to complement the most upscale environments including restaurants, resorts, hotel lobbies and ballrooms, and retail establishments.

The DA6 offers a unique, 115-degree cone-shaped coverage pattern that emanates from the face of the loudspeaker downwards at a 26-degree angle from the wall. The two-way, 6.5-inch surface mount DA6 integrates Community’s patented Carbon Ring Cone Technology™, delivering uniform voicing and consistent coverage from zone to zone when combined with other Distributed Design Series ceiling, surface mount and pendant loudspeakers, including the D10SUB ceiling mount and DS8SUB surface mount subwoofers.

The DA6′s true coaxial design achieves higher sensitivity and dramatically lower distortion thanks to the implementation of separate, discrete magnets for its LF and HF drivers. A built in autoformer offers selectable 70V or 100V operation in a distributed system, as well as standard 8 ohm use.

The DA6 is available in standard black or white finishes, and can be painted to match any décor. Enclosures are constructed of high-impact ABS plastic to reduce unwanted resonance, and the included flush-mount wall plate makes installation fast and efficient.

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Community Professional Loudspeakers is a manufacturer and supplier of professional audio equipment.  Since 1968, Community has led the pro-audio industry with technological innovations which have become industry standards. Today, Community offers over 150 professional loudspeaker products, including installed loudspeaker systems, weather-resistant outdoor loudspeaker systems, ceiling loudspeakers, high level voice paging systems, and portable entertainment systems.  Visit www.communitypro.com for more information. 

 

FSR’s New DV Wall Plate Interface Allows Analog & Digital Video to Play in the Same Sandbox

INCORPORATING LEGACY ANALOG AND DIGITAL VIDEO INTO AV SYSTEMS DESIGN JUST GOT EASIER

Woodland Park, NJ – FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, has introduced the Digital / Analog Wall Plate Interface -part of the new Digital Video (DV) family – to aid in the design of AV systems that incorporate legacy analog and digital video. The DV Family, aimed at professional installations requiring HDMI support, reduces the integration challenges inherent in the deployment of digital video systems.

The Digital / Analog Interface fits in a standard 2 gang electrical box and has a dual Decora faceplate available in white, black and ivory to match the décor of the installation. It accepts HDMI or DVI input, computer video and analog stereo audio. The wall plate will auto switch between the analog and digital inputs, or it can be manually switched from the front of the interface. The output is HDMI via a CAT 5e or 6 cable and can transmit 1080p up to 165 feet.

FSR offers a variety of HDMI CAT x receivers, switchers and scalars to complete the design.

For further details contact FSR at (800) 332-3771 or via e-mail at sales@fsrinc.com.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

FSR complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and is a woman owned business. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information visit www.fsrinc.com.

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FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

GV Audio Inc. Uses Yamaha CL5 to Mix Talent at Regina Folk Festival

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Held annually at Victoria Park in Regina, Saskatchewan on a weekend in August, the Regina Folk Festival is a much-anticipated celebration of folk music. With over 5,000 concertgoers in attendance each of the three days, the concert’s main stage this year featured Timber Timbre, Cold Specks, Shad, Mavis Staples, The Jim Cuddy Band, Great Lake Swimmers, Serena Ryder & The Heartbroken, Élage Diouf, Austra, Stars, The Barr Brothers, Pokey LaFarge & The South Country Three, Alejandra Robles, Arlo Guthrie Tribute to Woody Guthrie, and Emmylou Harris.

Regina Folk Festival used the production talents of local sound company, GV Audio, Inc. who chose a new Yamaha CL5 Digital Audio Console and two RIO-3224D remote I/Os for main stage front of house mixing. “Most of the visiting engineers were very familiar with Yamaha consoles, but since the CL5 is new, I first showed them the similarities to other Yamaha consoles and then ran them through features in the CL that they were interested in trying,” states Don Hricz, audio engineer, GV Audio. “They were able to quickly pull a mix together; some had brought their files with them that we easily converted to the CL5. One of the engineers downloaded the CL5 Editor the night before his show so he became quite familiar with the console.”

Hricz said that he and the other nine+ guest engineers were very impressed with the sound and feel of the console. “The Yamaha CL5 is my new favorite!”

For more information on GV Audio, Inc. visit www.gvaudio.ca.

For more information on the Yamaha CL5, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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PHOTO ID: GV Audio’s Don Hricz mixing Serena Ryder

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

GRUND AUDIO DESIGN DEBUTS VIP™ SERIES LOUDSPEAKERS

**** Photo: Grund Audio Design VIP series loudspeakers ****

Council Bluffs, IA – October 2012… Grund Audio Design, a pioneering manufacturer of loudspeaker and signal processing products for the audio professional, is pleased to announce the debut of the new VIP Series loudspeakers. Featuring 4 models—three of which are 3-way loudspeaker designs—the new Grund Audio Design VIP series feature the highest SPL sensitivity in their class, offer a sleek, modern design and appearance, and are an ideal solution for the AV installed sound market and AV presentation playback. more

Reno Church Sets FOH Free with StudioLive

Reno, NV – September 2012….  The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd has been a fixture in downtown Reno, Nevada, since the 1950s. Over the years, the church’s congregation has grown steadily, and last year plans were drawn for a new 500-seat worship center to be constructed adjacent to the original sanctuary.

Like many of today’s churches, Good Shepherd has been expanding outside the traditional Lutheran model, offering a range of services to cater to a broader congregation. “They offer a traditional Lutheran service early in the morning, followed by a more contemporary service with full band, and then one more traditional service,” says Scott Schmidt of Reno-based JC Productions.

Not surprisingly, that diversity calls for a flexible audio system that can handle everything from a straightforward organ and choir to a full-on rock band. With that in mind, Schmidt opted to install a PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2 digital console at the front-of-house mix position. The desk is used to mix the sound in the sanctuary, as well as sending multiple monitor mixes to the musicians, and making live recordings.

“The StudioLive is a great console for them,” explains Schmidt. “It gives them all the power and features of an expensive digital console, and it fits their budget. We didn’t have to purchase any outboard effects, which saves them money and space; they’re just using the processing that’s built into the console.”

The church’s audio crew took to the console immediately. “They recently hired a part-time technical director, just before the grand opening,” says Schmidt “He’s a young guy, very technically savvy, and of course he took to the StudioLive quickly. But even for an old analog guy like me, the console was easy to figure out.”

The StudioLive’s remote-mixing capability was one of the first priorities, followed closely by live recording. “We ordered them an iPad and a couple of Mac Minis,” says Schmidt.” They’ve set it up to record directly into Capture, and of course, the iPad allows the technical director to walk around the room and make adjustments and to walk up to the stage if need be.”

Schmidt also included some video, with a Christie digital projector feeding a DayLight 16:9 video screen behind the band. For the musicians, the back wall is equipped with four 55-inch NEC flat-panel displays, combining to create a single video wall.

“The system has performed flawlessly for them,” says Schmidt. “Everyone’s been very pleased with the results.”

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Founded in 1995, PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc., is a leading designer and manufacturer of audio-recording software, hardware, and related accessories. PreSonus software, microphone preamps, signal processors, digital audio interfaces, mixers, control surfaces and other products are used worldwide for recording, sound reinforcement, broadcast, sound design, and Internet audio.

 

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