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RECORD API 1608 SALES ALLOW FOR SUPERIOR COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CURRICULUMS ACROSS THREE CONTINENTS

Hochschule_Musik_NurnbergJESSUP, MARYLAND – SEPTEMBER 2014: Since introduced at the 123rd AES Convention in New York City in October 2007, the API 1608 console continues to make its way into colleges and universities across the globe. In the past year alone, more 1608s have been placed in educational institutions compared to any other year since 2007. These full-featured consoles, each with various channels of recording and mixing capabilities, now grant students, ranging from high school to graduate school, the opportunity to learn on the analog technology used in professional studios all over the world.

“We’re very pleased to have placed so many of these highly-versatile consoles in the past year,” said Larry Droppa, president of API Audio. “Each of these 1608s will now join the ranks of top audio schools including the New England School of Communications, American University, and California State University.”

Since the summer of 2013, nearly a dozen consoles have been placed in schools including Nashville’s Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School, and Blackbird Academy. Colleges and universities in the United States include Emerson College in Massachusetts, Mesa Community College in Arizona, Broward College in Florida, Glendale Community College in California, and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Locations outside the United States include the University of Western Ontario, Canada, Technologico de Monterrey in Mexico, the University of Örebro in Sweden, and Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg in Germany.

SUNY_PurchaseThe 1608 offers sixteen input channels, each with a mic pre and equalizer. It also has the option of adding sixteen-channel expanders, allowing for a 16, 32, or 48 channel console in total. API also offers its optional motorized fader automation system called P-Mix. Derived from the technology used extensively in API’s large format consoles, P-Mix offers a host of features found only in the most sophisticated console automation systems, often costing many times more.

“Since the 1608 is built to the same standards as our Vision and Legacy large-format consoles, it’s a powerful tool for students to learn with,” said Droppa. “It’s the same equipment used in some of the best recording facilities around the world, where many of the students will want to work after graduation.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

(PHOTO CAPTIONS) IMAGE 1: Hochschule für Musik Nürnberg in Germany; IMAGE 2: State University of New York (SUNY) Purchase.

STOP BY AND SEE US AT AES 2014 BOOTH #1219

COUNTRY MIX ENGINEER BILLY DECKER DISCOVERS REAL TALENT IN METRIC HALO PLUG-INS

BillyDeckerNASHVILLE, TENNESSEE – SEPTEMBER 2014: Mix engineer Billy Decker scored his first #1 single in 2006 with Rodney Atkins’ “If You’re Going Through Hell,” which is among the first (if not the first) #1 country song to be mixed entirely in Pro Tools and bounced to disc. He recently celebrated his eighth #1 single with Parmalee’s “Carolina.” An in-demand engineer stationed in Nashville, Decker gracefully negotiates the happy demands of a 22-year marriage and two children by maintaining a rigorous work schedule. “I come in at 8:30 in the morning and leave by 5:30 or 6:00,” he said. “I mix entirely in Pro Tools, where instant recall of everything allows me to juggle multiple projects at the same time.”

His knack for delivering radio-friendly mixes that play to the artists’ strengths has earned him work with a who’s who of country music talent: Darius Rucker, Kenny Chesney, Jason Aldean, Colt Ford, Montgomery Gentry, Frankie Ballard, Brett Michaels, Bubba Sparxxx, Josh Thompson, Josh Kelly, Kenny Loggins, Trace Adkins, John Michael Montgomery, and Billy Dean, in addition to the already-mentioned Rodney Atkins and Parmalee. As far back as he can remember, Decker has been using Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip plug-in, including all of his #1 songs, and he recently added Metric Halo’s Production Bundle plug-in collection to his streamlined workflow.

“I once found myself in a situation without ChannelStrip, and I tried to mix anyway,” Decker laughed. “It didn’t work. The mix sounded terrible, and I won’t ever try it again. ChannelStrip is absolutely indispensible to everything I do.” Basically, everything he’s ever mixed has ChannelStrip all over it. Apart from handling all of his routine and unusual equalization tasks, Decker relies on ChannelStrip for the all-important vocal compression. “I typically run three or four instances of ChannelStrip to get multiple compressors going at the same time,” he said. “Each compressor does a little bit, and in a different way, so that in the end I get a vocal that’s locked right in your face and that requires almost no gain riding. Recently, I’ve started adding ChannelStrip’s limiter at the end, which gives me a little bit more control and smooths out the top end.”

To keep his workflow speedy, Decker doesn’t fool around trying to listen for the right frequency to de-ess. He uses Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo sound analysis software, which is always running in the background to quickly diagnose issues. “That gives me the right starting point, and from there, yes, I use my ears to dial it in,” he said. “I use Metric Halo’s Precision DeEsser plug-in to do the de-essing; actually, I use two instances. One for traditional de-essing and the second for what I call ‘de-honking.’ Using so much compression brings a lot of junk to the surface, including the nasty nasal sound that pretty much every voice has between 1.5kHz and 2kHz. By setting the second Precision DeEsser to that frequency, everything smooths out and sounds much nicer. I’ve used a lot of de-esser plug-ins, but I find that Metric Halo’s version is noticeably smoother and more transparent. Where other plug-ins can sound grainy and degrade the signal, Precision DeEsser is colorless and pleasant.”

Decker has also been enjoying Metric Halo’s TransientControl plug-in for snares and toms. “Sam Hunt’s ‘Leave The Night On’ is climbing the charts, and it’s got TransientControl all over the drums,” Decker said. “It set a record for the most-added debut for a male country artist. I love the sound I get from TransientControl. I used to use its main competitor, but Metric Halo’s version sounds smoother. It tops a little tighter, has a better release, and a cleaner decay. I’d say that TransientControl rolls over each peak rather than falling over it. I’ve been very pleased.” Hunt’s single also contains Metric Halo’s HaloVerb on the snare. “I usually like plates on my snare drum with no pre-delay,” Decker continued. “For Sam’s single, I used a medium plate preset with a 700-800ms decay. It’s the perfect snare reverb – very thick and three-dimensional. After every snare hit, I can hear the little bits of dust crumbling in the background, little fairies floating around in the background. It’s very deep!”

Although collaborators frequently ask Decker to mix on a console at such-and-such famous studio, he staunchly refuses. “Technology has come a long way,” he said. “Digital has caught up, and it’s a much faster way to work. If you can turn on the radio and tell me which songs were mixed in the box and which were mixed on a console, well, I’ll buy you dinner. Hell, I’ll buy ya the whole restaurant!”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

INTRODUCING THE ATC SCM20ASL PRO MKII: ATC IMPROVES ITS MOST POPULAR SMALL-FORMAT, 2-WAY ACTIVE REFERENCE MONITOR

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – SEPTEMBER 2014:ATC_SCM20ASLPro_MkII TransAudio Group, U.S. rep for ATC and other boutique professional audio companies, introduces the ATC SCM20ASL Pro MkII near-field reference monitor. The ATC SCM20ASL Pro MkII improves upon the ATC SCM20ASL Pro. Like its predecessor, the MkII is a high-performance two-way active loudspeaker that is ideally suited for critical near-field applications or as surround channels in larger systems. Its exceptionally neutral output extends across the audible spectrum and is now improved by a new amplifier design, a new ATC-made dual suspension tweeter, and a new cabinet design.

“ATC is well-known for designing and building studio monitors that are unflinchingly truthful and that help engineers deliver mixes that translate everywhere,” said Brad Lunde, president of TransAudio Group. “ATC founder Billy Woodman and his team of R&D engineers never tire in the pursuit of perfection, and improvements to the passive SCM20PSL Pro MkII led to parallel improvements in the active the SCM20ASL Pro MkII.”

The new SCM20ASL Pro MkII is based around the ATC 6.5-inch “Super Linear” LF driver with integrated midrange, utilizing the same SL technology developed for the larger nine-, twelve- and fifteen-inch based monitors. Constructed with a 75mm/three-inch voice coil and a short-coil, long-gap topology, it combines the high-power handling and low-power compression usually only found in large, high-efficiency systems with the fine resolution and balance of modern high fidelity systems.

Five years in development, the new ATC dual-suspension 25mm tweeter offers lower distortion, higher output, and greater reliability. The electronics in the active design have also had considerable development time invested in them, resulting in reduced noise and distortion (a further -10dB @ 10kHz) and a reduced operating temperature for improved reliability. The amplifier design is a revised version of ATC’s discrete MOSFET Class A/B design with 200W and 50W continuous power available for the bass and high-frequency sections, respectively. The user controls have also been improved over the previous generation with more flexible input sensitivity controls and a revised low-frequency shelf control to help achieve good balance in difficult acoustic conditions. The amplifier includes protection circuits for both DC offset and thermal overload.

The new cabinet design maximizes linearity and minimizes size and weight. The cabinet has been restyled to more closely follow the larger monitors in ATC’s professional range and is constructed from heavily-braced MDF. Highly damped, elastomeric panels are bonded and stapled to the cabinet’s inner walls to suppress cabinet panel resonances, while the enclosure’s front panel is heavily radiused to reduce cabinet diffraction, improving the frequency response and imaging.

“Even given the excellence of the previous design, these new features lead to a substantive improvement,” Lunde concluded.

MSRP $6,695/pair

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.

www.transaudiogroup.com

BE SURE TO STOP BY AND SEE US AT AES 2014 BOOTH #1110

THE API BOX BREAKS INTO AUSTRALIAN MUSIC SCENE THROUGH FAMED SONGWRITER/PRODUCER STUART CRICHTON

Crichton_Sloss_1VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA: As the API BOX makes its way to recording studios around the world, it has now found its first home in Australia through world-renowned songwriter/ producer, Stuart Crichton. Crichton has been a contributing factor in numerous top ten hits internationally, primarily in the U.K. He consulted Deb Sloss at Studio Connections Australia, API’s Australian distributor, when looking to make the addition to his home studio.

In just a short period of time, the BOX has already made a difference for Stuart. “The API BOX has totally changed the quality of my mixes, adding the warmth and width of a large room console,” Stuart shares. “The ease of set up and use is amazing – so straight-forward.”

Quality of sound is the most important feature for Stuart, who works with major artists including Kylie Minogue, Guy Sebastian, and Pet Shop Boys. “The mic pres and EQs are that beautiful API sound that many crave. The bus compressor is also now a major part of my mixes. Once I’m done mixing, I put it over the whole mix and BANG! There it is – a real vintage sound for what are usually digital-sounding mixes.”

Stuart relocated from the U.K. to Australia in late 2009, where he continues to make his footprint in the Australian recording scene, as well as work with top artists from around the world. He’s finding that his new console is the perfect tool to achieve a big studio sound in a relatively small space. “The BOX is an affordable way for a home studio to get that big room sound, which usually costs a lot of money per day.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com
(PHOTO CAPTION) Stuart Crichton with Deb Sloss of Studio Connections Australia. (PHOTO CREDIT: © 2014 SCA)

DPA Helps Ivan Rutherford Bring Broadway to Hong Kong

Internationally acclaimed artist Ivan Rutherford turned to DPA’s d:facto™ Vocal Microphone to help him give a truly emotional performance during a recent one-off show in Hong Kong.

The actor and singer, who has performed the role of Jean Valjean in Les Miserables over 2,000 times on Broadway, was looking for a microphone that could deliver exceptional sound quality and clarity through a large venue sound system. He also wanted a hand held microphone so that he could move freely on stage while he sang a series of Broadway hits dating from the 1930s to the present day. DPA’s d:facto Vocal Microphone fitted the bill perfectly. Rutherford used the microphone in a wireless configuration with a Sennheiser Wireless System, which made movement possible and allowed him to deliver a vocal performance that was memorable for the audience.

“I had never used a DPA microphone before and I was very pleased with the experience,” Rutherford says. “I was impressed with the intensity of the sound and the mobility it allowed onstage, which gave me great freedom to make unobstructed connections with my audience. I also enjoyed the feel and weight of the microphone in my hand, and found that it helped give me the necessary confidence for a one man performance. I would very much enjoy working with a DPA mic again.”

Rutherford’s show, entitled A Taste of Broadway, took place at the Academic Community Hall in Hong Kong. Mr. Clarence Chang, from Jazz World Live Series that organized the concert, says: “The only instrument on stage was a grand piano, which was also miked with DPA – a matched pair of d:dicate™ 4011A Cardiod Microphones in A-B configuration to capture the main piano signal and d:vote™ 4099 Instrument Microphones in a stereo piano kit configuration to provide additional percussive effect from the hammers. This proved to be a very successful formula because the piano sounded fantastic – really crisp and lively, yet with all the body and warmth one would expect from a top of the range instrument.”

Ken Kimura, DPA’s General Manager for the APAC region, and Ricky Wan, from DPA’s Hong Kong distributor Digital Media Technology, were on hand to ensure the optimal microphone set up.

“The d:facto Vocal Microphone in a wireless configuration was a perfect match for Ivan Rutherford as it enabled him to move freely, while capturing every nuance of his voice,” Kimura says. “When you have a two hour show that only consists of a singer and grand piano, you really need that artist to be super talented and to have a great voice. Ivan Rutherford had both of these attributes in abundance and gave a fantastic performance.”

-ends-

About DPA
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to provide you – whether you’re in live sound, recording, theater or broadcast – with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for your tasks. DPA takes no shortcuts in the design processes nor makes any compromises in manufacturing, which is all done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability, and above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound.
For more information, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

JOEL HAMILTON RECORDS AND MIXES “PUSS N BOOTS” DEBUT USING ATC SCM25A’s

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – AUGUST 2014: Puss n Boots is a three-piece, all-female, alt-country band led by singer-songwriter Norah Jones and backed by accomplished vocalists Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper. All three women learned new instruments for five years before recording their debut album with engineer/musician/producer Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Black Keys, Sparklehorse, Elvis Costello) at Studio G Brooklyn. Titled No Fools, No Fun, the album was recently released on Blue Note Records. As co-owner of Studio G Brooklyn with Tony Maimone, Hamilton installed ATC SCM25A three-way reference monitors and ATC SCM0.1-15 subwoofers in Studio A, a change that happily coincided with his first Grammy nomination (Pretty Lights, A Color Map of the Sun), a Latin Grammy nomination (Bomba Estereo, Elegancia Tropical), and a Latin Grammy win (Gaby Moreno, Postales). The ATCs were purchased from Audio Power Tools in New York.

“The ATCs have changed the way I work and improved the quality of my work,” said Hamilton. “I’m lucky to have a nicely tuned control room with an SSL and plenty of vintage outboard gear, and with the ATCs, I’m suddenly able to make decisions that are smaller – and yet more critical – than I have ever been able to make before. I have the ability to resolve a finer shade of the colors I’m hurling at the end-listener, and it’s been a revelation. It’s not a small thing, and that’s why I’m reaching for dramatic words like that. It’s tectonic. The entire continent has shifted.”

The glorious harmonies delivered by Jones, Dobson and Popper are a huge part of Puss n Boots’ magic. They form the emotional foreground. “The balance of those harmonies is crucial,” said Hamilton. “You’ve got these three gorgeous women with gorgeous voices, and they’re all coming at you like gangbusters because they can all project. We recorded everything live to analog tape, including the vocals. That gives a particular nuance to how the instruments sit against the vocals. You can feel the beat push and pull so beautifully. I needed to make sure that all of that nuance would come shining through for the listener. Striking the right midrange balance of those harmonies is critical, and I had to make sure all of that beauty would be immediately apparent to, say, my mom!”

While Norah Jones’ existing albums might safely be described as “polished” and most classic country albums might safely be described as “rough,” Hamilton had to walk the line between those extremes. “The balance is deliberately raw, which is perhaps unexpected by traditional Norah Jones standards, but it also has to be informed,” he said. “We were shooting for a tiny bulls eye, but we also had to make sure that everything felt unfettered and natural; just on the edge of scratchy so that it felt rough but didn’t actually hurt people. With the ATCs, I could find that line and make adjustments with confidence. I could tell where I was overcooking it on purpose. I could dial in just the right amount of ‘road house.’”

With the introduction of the ATCs, gone too is the need to translate for the client how a mix will sound outside of the studio. “After spending a lot of time in front of other monitors, I could tell when certain things would sound bad in the studio but fine outside of the studio,” Hamilton said. “The challenge beyond that, however, was convincing the client that those bad things would be fine later on, which is just one more thing to heap onto the already-skittish nature of an attended mix session. And so clients would ask, ‘why don’t you just get monitors that sound like it will sound like?’ It seems so simple, but of course it’s not.”

Hamilton used to switch between a number of monitors and loudspeakers all day long, but now he just hangs out on the ATCs. Depending on the task at hand, he can turn the ATC subwoofer on or not. “With the sub on and the volume cracked, the ATCs rock and serve as ‘mains,’” he said. “When I’m listening closely and resolving small moves, the ATCs are my nearfields. Either way, I now have complete confidence in what I’m hearing and doing. When a mix sounds good on the ATCs, I know it will sound good everywhere else. With Puss n Boots, we were able to make solid decisions that stuck. We totally avoided the hell of endless revisions!”

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.

www.transaudiogroup.com

METRIC HALO GEAR NO MYTH FOR FOH ENGINEER SUNE SNELLMAN JAKOBSEN

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK – AUGUST 2014: Sune Snellman Jakobsen is a live mix engineer stationed in Copenhagen, Denmark whose credits include world tours with The Raveonettes, Mew, Mercury Rev from NY, Kashmir from Denmark, and, most recently, Trentemøller. An avid Metric Halo user, Jakobsen owns a ULN-8 interface and a LIO-8 interface and regularly uses their SpectraFoo sound analysis software to set up shows and to help identify and solve problems while mixing. His interfaces carry Metric Halo’s optional +DSP, which allows him to run their powerful plug-ins on critical live channels (including the whole mix!).

Jakobsen’s entry into the industry was not so worldly, nor so high-tech, but it set him on the right path. “I became interested in audio as a member of the underground punk scene in Copenhagen during my teenage years,” he said. “I played guitar in punk bands and hung out in a punk club where some older guys taught me the basics of mixing consoles, multi-way speaker systems, stage monitors, and all that. Neither the bands nor the audience cared too much about fidelity or clarity, so I could mix shows night-after-night and no one complained about my dreadful mixes. It was hard on the ears but good practice for a novice.”

One of Jakobsen’s punk rock mentors recommended him for a job with one of Denmark’s leading PA companies, and he spent the next several years prepping outboard racks, packing house-boxes for rentals, driving trucks, rigging PAs, and patching microphones on tours and festival stages. “The whole time I was looking over the shoulders of all the experienced and skilled monitor and FOH engineers,” he said. “I soon moved from rigging and miking to actually operating the boards, which was exciting. I got pretty good at mixing monitors, and I was able to mix FOH for a few up-and-coming acts.”

As his skills and industry contacts grew, more bands hired Jakobsen to engineer their shows, prompting him to make the move to full-time freelance. After some years of regional touring with local bands, he signed on to a worldwide tour with The Raveonettes. “The band had just landed a major label deal and had a lot of hype going so we went back and forth from European to U.S. club tours and festivals,” he said. “We performed on the Late Show with David Letterman a few times, Conan, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, numerous radio sessions, and support-tours with Depeche Mode, Interpol, The Strokes, Supergrass and many others. Those support tours were great because they gave me new opportunities to learn from great live engineers.” When The Raveonettes finally took a break after six years of constant touring, Jakobsen signed on with Mew and, later, Trentemøller.

“As a FOH engineer, I think it’s important to embrace the sonic ideals of the artist,” Jakobsen said. “I don’t see any point in applying my own favorite flavor if it doesn’t appeal to the artist. Along those lines, it’s critical to build a relationship of trust so the artist feels I have an understanding and appreciation of what their music should sound like. It was an interesting transition to go from The Raveonettes’ minimal, noisy, and reverb-y soundscape to Mew’s big sonic universe, with big pounding drums and layers of pads, guitars, and backing vocals.” Although still working with Mew, Jakobsen began touring with Trentemøller in 2010, which took him to European arenas in support of Depeche Mode, 3,000-seat headlining gigs, and plenty of European festivals. “I’m still fascinated by the way a good mix can lift a music experience (and how a bad mix can ruin a show), and I’m still intrigued by how difficult it is to reinforce audio and to mix,” he said. “I like the combination of creativity, technical skills, and science. It’s an ongoing learning experience, and that’s cool.”

SETTING UP THE SHOW
Jakobsen seldom has more than a short window to load in, set up, check the PA, and sound check before doors open. One of the first things he addresses is the PA system performance: “The frequency response should be full range and both level and response should be as uniform as possible throughout the audience area. I use Metric Halo SpectraFoo sound analysis software on most every gig to analyze and help tune the PA system.” He typically sends pink noise to one side of the PA, feeds the same signal to SpectraFoo’s Transfer Function source channel, places his Earthworks M30 measuring mic somewhere on-axis, and feeds its output to the Transfer Function response channel. He then time aligns the two signals with SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder and takes a snapshot of the response. He repeats this process with the mic at several other locations – a little farther or closer, and on or off axis. He marks the snapshots in SpectraFoo’s overlay list and asks it to calculate an average.

“That,” he said, “is then my visual reading of the system. I immediately get an idea of the PA at hand and whether it’s reasonably linear or not. Sometimes I’ll spot an issue even before I listen to music. For example if there’s a broad dip in the 1k-6k range it could indicate the gain settings in the system crossover aren’t right and the hi-mid drivers are gained too low. Or a dip at the crossover frequency of the sub and the low-mid could indicate phase or timing issues with the subs. It’s of course important to listen to reference music and tune with the ears in addition to the SpectraFoo output, but the visual plot is a great help in locating problem frequencies.” He uses SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder along with the phase response of the Transfer Function to time-align subwoofers, fills, and delay speakers if necessary. During sound check, he uses its Correlation Meter and Phase Torch to verify phasing between sources (e.g. bass DI and bass mic). Ringing the system with Spectragraph allows him to quickly identify and notch out problem frequencies with the Metric Halo EQ plug-in.

MIXING THE SHOW
Jakobsen described his mix philosophy: “The mix itself must complement the music and should hopefully impress and overwhelm the audience. All of the instruments should be well-defined within the mix. Vocals should almost always be on top of the mix, and lyrics should be audible. I tend to favor ‘wall of sound’ mixes, with gaps in the soundscape filled by anything available from stage, perhaps by mixing guitar parts up very close to the vocal or adding lush reverb to drums or percussion. I like to be overwhelmed by sound when I’m in the audience, so I aim to do the same when I’m mixing. I think one key to an interesting mix is to feature supporting roles as much as lead roles, be it a rhythm guitar or a tambourine or whatever; I think it helps keep people’s attention when all the different roles are well defined.”

Jakobsen uses his Metric Halo ULN-8 and LIO-8 along with the free Metric Halo MIO Console control software as an audio “multi-tool.” MIO Console allows him to route signals and to operate the DSP resources he has installed on the interfaces. With Trentemøller, he reserves the Metric Halo gear for the tracks that need the most processing: vocals, kick drum and snare drum. “I’m not aware of any other interface that has the combination of such great-sounding preamps, transparent converters, sublime mix bus processing, and all of the DSP tools necessary: unlimited bands of precise EQs, compression, limiting, delay, and ‘character’ modeling. At the same time, it gives me a straightforward interface for recording and playback.”

For vocals, Jakobsen uses Metric Halo’s “Classic British Mic Pre” character, followed by a “MIOstrip” loaded with a six-band EQ for sweetening, two compressors with complementary fast and slow settings, a second six-band EQ for notching out problem frequencies, and a very fast compressor with a side chain high-passed at 5kHz to serve as a de-esser. “In addition, I use the ‘California Vocal Box’ character on the vocal’s master strip, which I find adds a nice grainy texture,” he said. “For the current tour, Trentemøller asked for a vocal distortion for a few songs. I made a virtual MIO channel and tried different combinations of the Pedal and Amp macros. I ended up with a combination of the ‘Screamer’ into the ‘MHClean’ with some delay and a lot of compression and EQ. It sounds great!”

Jakobsen uses similar processing for the kick and snare drum. ” I almost always mix drums into a group and insert a stereo ULN-8 or LIO-8 input, split that into two stereo channel strips in MIO Console – one with no processing (or perhaps just Metric Halo’s Transient Designer) and one with a hard squashing compressor, Transient Designer, and often a bit of soft clip to give the drums an edgy character,” he said. “Those channels sum to a stereo output that’s a killer parallel compression drum group insert. I even have the option to add different characters to the drum group, for example the ‘Soft-Saturation’ character for a fatter and more punchy sound, and I have an EQ on the output bus that allows me to cut boomy frequencies in the low end or add high-end brilliance on the fly.”

Finally, Jakobsen sends the entire mix into a stereo MIO Console channel that gets routed to two auxiliary groups, one with “SoftSat” Character applied and one without. “I can then mix between these two depending on the PA system of the day,” he said. “It’s like having a wet/dry control on the SoftSat Character, which can really make the PA system sound like it’s ‘in your face.’ Then I route that mix to multiple master busses with different EQs and delays for the main PA, the subs, fills, and delays.” During the performance, Jakobsen keeps SpectraFoo open with a Level Meter on the house sound, a Spectragram and a Spectragraph on the mix bus, and a Spectragraph on the solo bus for quickly diagnosing problems with individual channels. “It’s especially helpful for getting the low-end even. If I hear a boomy note in the bass, it’s easy to identify with SpectraFoo,” he concluded.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

WIND OVER THE EARTH ADDS AN API 1608 TO ITS DEMO ROOM STUDIO

BOULDER, COLORADO – AUGUST 2014: Situated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Wind Over the Earth (WOTE) offers recording sessions for local bands, singer/songwriters, and voice-overs, as well as post-production and training services within its demo studios. It doesn’t promote itself as a commercial studio, but rather uses its space as a base of knowledge to be shared with the community. As a longtime user of API gear, WOTE has now commissioned an in-house 1608 console to offer real world knowledge and applications to its customers.

“Jumping into the 1608 is something we wanted to do for quite some time,” stated Mark Venezia, studio manager at WOTE. “The classic sound of API is something WOTE has been advocating for years, so when we were making the decision to install a console, the 1608 was the right fit.”

Since the commissioning, the 1608’s headroom, imaging, and overall depth of sound have made an immediate impact. “The 1608 has brought us up to another level of visibility,” shared Venezia. “It has made our life that much easier. The work flow on everything we do is smoother.”

Part of what makes the 1608 a success at WOTE is the setup. “We have everything wired into four bays as of right now, and the ease of use revealed itself in our first session. We custom-build all of our cables here at WOTE, and the last two 1608 consoles we have sold have included custom wiring packages for specific client needs,” explained Venezia. “In each case, customers who have been in our demo room learned first-hand the ease of use. The versatility of moving modules around is nice as well.”

With some post-production projects, recording sessions, and a series of live shows using the 1608 already complete, WOTE is eager to pursue further trainings. “We are putting together a series of master’s mixing seminars, where we will be flying out some high-profile engineers for an evening of knowledge sharing in the mixing environment. We love hosting seminars like this, as community is our number one priority,” shared Venezia. Part of the glue that holds all the future works together is the knowledge WOTE is able to pair with the gear it offers. “The 1608 is the centerpiece of the room, and everything is based around it.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

L.A.’s CHALICE RECORDING GETS DOWN WITH DANLEY

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 2014: The client list at Chalice Recording Studio in Hollywood, California is so extensive that it is challenging to think of a celebrity who is not on it. For example, the “B” section includes the Backstreet Boys, Barbara Streisand, Beastie Boys, Justin Bieber, Beyoncé, the Black Eyed Peas, Blink 182, and Britney Spears and the “P” section includes Paris Hilton, Perry Farrell, Prince, and Puff Daddy. Those clients use Chalice Recording Studio as the medium through which they turn ideas into platinum albums and Grammy Awards. So Chalice is always humming – almost literally – with the next big thing. Because top-volume monitoring (think 120dB+) and deep, authentic bass at those extreme SPLs have become so critical to so many hip-hop and top-40 artists, engineers, and producers, Chalice Recording Studio has installed Danley Sound Labs TH-115 subwoofers in studios A and B.

“Before we installed the Danley subs, we were blowing our subwoofer drivers once or twice a week,” said Lowell Pickett, head studio tech at Chalice. “It’s because the monitoring volume is often really extreme; more and more, our clients are using the main system to gauge the music’s impact at club volumes. It’s a visceral thing – they want to feel it as much as hear it. Anyway, I did some research, and more than one person suggested that I check out Danley.”

Compared with conventional designs, Danley Sound Labs’ patented Tapped Horn (TH) subwoofer technology delivers deeper low-end extension, a more even frequency response, and much lower distortion. Indeed, few people understand how distorted conventional subwoofers are until they hear a Danley Tapped Horn subwoofer. To help make their decision, the Chalice staff A/B’d the Danley TH-115s against their existing big-name subwoofers in Studio A.

“The Danley subs were way, way better,” Pickett said flatly. “Previously, there was no place in the room where the bass seemed focused. With these subs, I could really hear what was going on in most places in the room. Everything tightened up and became clearer, and our low end got even lower.” “There’s a magic that happens when the Danley subwoofers at Chalice pair up with the full-range system,” added Kenny Andrews, the area Danley rep. “It’s a very musical sound.”

As part of the Danley installation, Chalice did something very few studios are willing to do (yet). They put the entire monitoring signal through a Danley DSLP48 digital processor, which provided clean crossovers, as well as flexible equalization and filtering for tuning the room. “We were nervous,” Pickett admitted. “We had previously used high-end analog crossovers and equalizers. This was a jump, but everyone agrees it has been all up side and no down side. The sound is as transparent as ever, and the uniform channel processing has tightened up the stereo imaging. The DSLP48′s equalizers are great and have helped the acousticians who tune the room.” As a bonus, Chalice uses the DSLP48 to provide different presets to different clients.

Output from the Danley DSLP48 feeds a Danley DSLA3.3K dual-channel amplifier, which in turn powers the two Danley TH-115 subwoofers. The processor output also feeds the existing full-range system, an Augspurger GA215H with 15-inch TAD 1601 B woofers and TAD 4002 beryllium compression drivers. All the loudspeaker components, as well as the Danley TH-115 subwoofers, are soffit mounted.

“Our clients noticed the improvement right away, and we stopped replacing subwoofer drivers on a weekly basis,” said Pickett. “With the Danleys, the volume can be so great that the light fixtures fall from the ceiling! That really tickles the clients!” With Studio A booked out completely, Chalice made the same change in Studio B. Now Studio B has a pair of Danley TH-115s, backed by additional Danley processing and amplification.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

BOCK AUDIO ACCURATELY CAPTURES THE CLASSIC SOUND OF A TUBE 47 IN THE MODERN BOCK 407

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – AUGUST 2014: Just as he has captured the sound of the vintage Telefunken 251 in the Bock 251 and the sound of the vintage Neumann U47 FET in the Bock iFet, studio microphone genius David Bock has now captured the sound of the vintage Neumann U47 tube microphone in the new Bock 407. As with Bock’s other products, TransAudio Group will distribute the Bock 407 in the United States. Studios and individuals who want the timeless 47 sound will find it in the Bock 407 at half the price of a vintage unit and without the reliability and serviceability issues for which vintage microphones are so horribly notorious. Indeed, David Bock gained most of his critical insights into the 47′s sound by servicing a seemingly endless parade of vintage units that marched into his shop.

“The Bock 407 has that smooth, creamy midrange you associate with a 47, along with the signature proximity effect that vocalists like Robert Plant and Frank Sinatra used so famously,” said Brad Lunde, president of TransAudio Group. “It sounds stunning. Importantly, David designed the 407 to use new ‘old stock’ materials: materials that are in current production and that replicate the properties of vintage materials that are no longer being made. The Bock 407 is affordable, consistent, reliable, and, when the time eventually comes, easily serviceable.”

The Bock 407 borrows its power supply and amplifier from the flagship Bock 507 and adds a custom k47-type capsule that David Bock tirelessly prototyped and adjusted to bring to its current perfection. The microphone has a cardioid pickup-pattern and ships with a remote power supply, a professional spider-type shock mount, and a custom twenty-foot cable that connects the microphone to the power supply. In addition to its signature “big vocal” sound (both male and female), the Bock 407 will shine a beautiful light on brass, strings, and percussion. It can also serve as the whole solution for small ensembles or simple guitar and vocal performances.

TransAudio Group is currently taking orders from dealers and suggests that interested users contact their dealers for a demonstration.

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.www.transaudiogroup.com

The BOCK 407 is now shipping. MSRP: $7,175.00

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