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Archive of the NAMM Newslink Category

SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS REVITALIZES THE AUDIO AT THE HISTORIC SUFFOLK THEATER

RIVERHEAD, NEW YORK – NOVEMBER 2013: The Suffolk Theater in historic downtown Riverhead, New York opened its doors for the first time in 1933, and the public faithfully filled its resplendent art-deco interior night after night. Movies put the theater in the black for decades, but proliferating strip malls, the rise of the multiplex, and America’s seedy love affair with the living room couch decimated the Suffolk’s crowds and led to its final performance in 1987. The story is hardly unique to The Suffolk, and twenty years passed before area residents realized what they lost in the bargain. In the past decade, the tides turned, and, under new ownership, The Suffolk Theater responded with the sound of renovation. It recently reopened to tremendous fanfare, and beneath its carefully-restored Depression-era art-deco façade breathes a 21st Century audio/video/lighting system that includes a 36-input/20-output Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 Dante networked DSP system.

Award-winning theatre and A/V designer Stuart Allyn of A.D.R. Studios (Irvington, New York) designed and commissioned the new theatrical/audio/video systems at The Suffolk Theater, and Theatrical Services and Supplies (Hauppauge, New York) installed it. “Of course, a lot of thought goes into every aspect of a system like this,” said Allyn. “I went with the SymNet Radius 12×8 because it’s a cost-effective processor that is totally flexible, both in terms of its processing power and its input/output count.” The Suffolk Theater needed a large number of inputs and outputs because the entire system throughout the building is fed from the central FOH position. A wide number of areas (bars, offices, restrooms, backstage, etc.) are all capable of receiving the main show audio (and video in some cases) plus each area, at the touch of a button, can optionally receive a local source such as cable TV or a Blu-ray player. Each area when viewing the stage feed must be time aligned to the stage, and when viewing local sources that timing needs to be synced to the video. Each “zone” required speaker processing for each mode of operation. By having all the system processing centralized and separate, sound mixers using the digital mixing system are free to use whatever systems, EQs etc. they desire to use in the console, while the main speaker and system processing remains in place. The Symetrix system handled all that very easily. To the twelve inputs and eight outputs of the system’s single Radius 12×8, Allyn added two Symetrix SymNet xIn 12 expansion boxes and one Symetrix SymNet xOut 12. Like all products in the Symetrix SymNet Radius and Edge family, the expansion boxes connect to the processor via the robust, low-latency Dante network protocol.

“We’ve used a lot of Symetrix products in the past, and we’ve never had issues,” said Allyn. “Symetrix equipment sounds good and works well at commissioning and over the long haul. In addition, I like using SymNet Composer to build customized processing. I can see the entire system on one screen, and that overview is important to me. Then I can drill down as needed.” The system includes comprehensive Crestron control, but that didn’t stop Allyn from making cost-effective use of Symetrix’ inexpensive ARC-2e wall panel remotes. Eight ARC-2e’s placed at strategic locations in ancillary rooms and spaces allow users to select from presets and to change input sources and volumes. Indeed, several of the Symetrix ARC-2e’s send command strings to the SymNet Radius 12×8 system and to the system’s Crestron video switcher!

Although the super low latency Dante network plays no larger role in the system, the scalability of the Symetrix SymNet system via Dante was a critical factor in its selection. “We designed the system with foresight of possible future expansion in mind,” said Allyn. “There’s a lot of extra wiring in place that will allow them to expand the stage and the dressing room areas. If needed, we can simply add another Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 to the system via Dante to accommodate even more inputs, outputs, and processing. It is a beautiful venue that should provide great entertainment to Long Island for many years to come.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

METRIC HALO GEAR SCORES HIGH IN PROFESSOR WHALEY’S RAP-MATICS STEM-EDUCATION PROGRAM

WASHINGTON D.C./ATLANTA, GEORGIA – NOVEMBER 2013: As a founding member of the pioneering San Francisco hip-hop group Bored Stiff, Pablo Sierra Whaley (aka “Professor Whaley”) has been writing raps and producing music since 1988. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from U.C. Berkeley and a master’s degree in biomedical engineering from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Between the two degrees, Whaley spent several years as a middle school math teacher and department chair in the Bay Area, where he first developed his innovative “Rap-Matics” program for boosting STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) competency using elements of hip-hop, poetry, and technology. Today, Whaley continues to curate the Rap-Matics curriculum and operate his production studio, Sonic Legacy Music with the help of Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip 3.

“Music is in my DNA,” asserted Whaley. “I was born into a musical family. My mom, grandma, and great-grandma all played piano. I played the trumpet in middle school, and then started a hip-hop group with my friend ‘Equipto,’ a now-legendary Frisco MC. As a teacher, one of the problems I noticed early on was that students were not connecting with the subject matter in the math books we were using. So I decided to take a new approach. I knew that my students loved the hip-hop culture. As an MC, I knew that rapping was a tool that could be used to connect people with concepts and information. I had ‘math-raps’ and ‘chemistry-raps’ to prove it. So I decided to create a literacy program that fused rap with mathematics. This was in the spring of 2000. To my knowledge, I am the first educator in the United States to have created a hip-hop-based math literacy program.”

Whaley founded Sonic Legacy Music in 2005. “I’ve used hundreds of different plug-ins from the freeware to the top-of-the-line stuff,” he said. “But nowadays, whenever I make music, I use Metric Halo ChannelStrip 3. It’s an extremely versatile plug-in. I’m using it for mixing and mastering several of my own projects right now, including unreleased Rap-Matics tracks and client projects. I have also used its de-noising, equalization, and compression to clean up audio from Rap-Matics video footage. The EQ is amazing, especially on drums and vocals. The scalable GUI is awesome. The presets are truly useful and the EQ curves are easy to grab and manipulate. The compressor is clean, but I can tweak it to get a more grimy sound when I need it. Overall, the ChannelStrip 3 is my go-to plug-in for all things requiring gating, compression, or equalization… which is pretty much everything!”

ABOUT METRIC HALO
Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

METRIC HALO JUMPS ON ECLECTIC FUMUJ RELEASE

PARIS, FRANCE: The French band Fumuj blends elements of hip-hop, dub, electronica, and – in the words of co-founder, sound designer, engineer, and drummer Romain Pasquier – “loud music” on their fourth studio effort FUMUJ – Eponym Album. The five-song EP surveys the eclectic content of Fumuj’s prior work and reframes it with an urgency and intensity that suggests a band that has matured into form. Beyond its genre-bending take on composition and style, Fumuj is also known for its unique and vibrant sound, which is carefully curated by Pasquier. Metric Halo hardware and software figures prominently in that sound: Fumuj and its members own one or more Metric Halo ULN-8s, ULN-2s, and 2882s, and most of Pasquier’s processing and mixing relies on Metric Halo MIO Console (the free routing and recording software that runs the interfaces) and Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip plug-in.

“The new EP is somewhere between Mogwai, Helmet, and Bill Laswell, I guess,” said Pasquier. “We had a lot of fun creating these songs because we felt free to do anything. There were no limits. We all love to deconstruct and reconstruct elements, playing on contrasts, and building something new and inspiring through that process.” Having equipment with the flexibility and reliability to let that process unfurl naturally and without interruption is essential, and after first discovering Metric Halo a few years back, Fumuj has enjoyed the inspiration that comes with a transparent workflow.

“In anticipation of our recording sessions, a friend lent us some high-end, customized preamps and some crazy mics,” said Pasquier. “They were fun to use, but at some point in the first day I decided to use the ULN-8 preamps because I wasn’t feeling very happy or confident about the sound we were getting. It was like I turned to the ULN-8 because I wanted to know what was actually going on in the new room we were using. I realized I just wanted that Metric Halo transparency! I can trust what I hear from the ULN-8, ULN-2, or 2882. There’s no compromise. The preamps are great, the converters are great, the DSP – including the 80-bit summing mixer – is great, and it all fits in one rack unit! We can recall the MIO Console for each song, which makes the workflow easy.”

Pasquier used the Metric Halo ChannelStrip 3 plug-in extensively on FUMUJ IV. “I love ChannelStrip because the equalization and compression can be so subtle,” he said. “It’s very painless to use, and the newly-integrated spectrum analyzer makes it easy to see where adjustments will be most effective. I know it’s a small thing, but I’m also grateful for the ability to resize ChannelStrip 3.” In addition to his work with Fumuj, Pasquier also uses ChannelStrip and his Metric Halo hardware to do freelance work in Paris, which gives him an authentic sound that sets his work apart from engineers that use run of the mill equipment.

Fumuj’s FOH engineer, Alain Lesparat, recently purchased two Metric Halo 2882 interfaces and is now using them with Apple MainStage as a virtual effects rack and as an archive recorder for all shows. Although Pasquier has used his ULN-8 together with Ableton Live and the band’s hardware synthesizers, he looks forward to acquiring another 2882 or LIO-8 to dedicate to the live rig. “I can’t live with the ULN-8 in the rack on the days off,” he laughed. When asked what makes Metric Halo interfaces so useful for Fumuj’s live applications, Pasquier cited “a fat, open sound” and the tremendous flexibility of MIO Console. In addition, he said, “They’re also completely reliable. They just work, period. All the other members of Fumuj now have a ULN-2, and they aren’t engineers! They would have no patience for bugs or latency. With Metric Halo, they can simply make music.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

GRUNDORF CORPORATION ANNOUNCES NEW WEBSITES

Council Bluffs, IA – November 2013… Grundorf Corporation, a leading manufacturer of equipment for musicians and audio professionals, is pleased to announce the debut of two new websites—one for the division that sells cases and accessories (Grundorf) and the other for the division that sells loudspeakers, audio processors, and related equipment (Grund Audio Design). The two website URL’s are www.grundorf.com (cases / accessories) and www.GrundAudio.com (loudspeakers / processors). more

NOW YOU CAN MIX IN THE BOX

JESSUP, MARYLAND – OCTOBER 2013: Automated Processes Inc. (API) takes great pleasure in announcing the latest addition to its line of highly acclaimed analog consoles: THE BOX® project console. THE BOX is specifically designed for audio professionals with project or home studios who require a smaller format console with that “big console sound.” True to its heritage, THE BOX features the same circuitry, performance and legendary API sound as the company’s highly successful Vision, Legacy Plus and 1608 consoles. The new console debuted to a highly enthusiastic AES show in New York, and is now shipping from the company’s factory in Jessup, Maryland.

“THE BOX offers an easy, turnkey solution for recording and mixing,” said API President Larry Droppa. “It’s a great option for people who record a few channels at a time, but demand the warmth and punch that a large API console delivers. In addition to four inputs, full center section control, and 16 channels of API’s famous summing, the icing on the cake is a classic API stereo compressor on the program bus. Now you can truly record and mix… in THE BOX.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

WESTLAKE PRO SPEAKS OUT ABOUT ITS NEW 1608

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – OCTOBER 2013: API announces the placement of another 1608 console in Southern California, this time into the newly0complete and fully-furnished demo room at Westlake Pro.

The choice to add the 1608 to Studio A came with ease. “The API 1608 is a fantastic tracking console with an impressive legacy. It appeals to anyone looking to keep analog production techniques in today’s digital workstation environments,” said Westlake’s CEO George Adjieff. “The high-quality circuitry, the classic analog look, feel, and sound of an API console are unmatched.”

“It is customizable so that you can add any API 500 Series® modules that you need, enabling you the flexibility to craft your perfect console,” said Westlake President Joe Taupier. “The layout is intuitive and easy to understand, allowing a wide range of producers, mixers, and engineers to focus all their attention on what they do best – making the music sound just right.”

As longtime API supporters, Westlake Pro knows the value of quality products with a longstanding reputation. “API has a legendary lineage, great brand recognition, and everything about this mixer is well-conceived,” said Taupier. “The layout is smart, the board is made from quality components, and any studio will instantly receive esteem and credibility if an API console is in the room.”

The 1608 has become a popular addition to Westlake Pro and a regular spot to find pro audio lovers and gear enthusiasts. “Clients are wildly impressed with the API 1608 in our space,” said Adjieff. “Our clients enjoy spending hours trying it out, listening to mixes, and demoing and evaluating other pieces of equipment. It really is the central piece of gear in the room, and really enhances the studio that we’ve designed around it.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

FOH ENGINEER BOB COKE USES METRIC HALO’S SPECTRAFOO TO MIX THE BLACK CROWES

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – OCTOBER 2013: When we caught up with him, Bob Coke was drawing on his decades of FOH experience to mix The Black Crowes with the help of Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo sound analysis software as the band toured the U.S. in the fall of 2013. The path that took Coke from a “penniless” musician with proficiency on Indian Tablas, sarod, and acoustic guitar to the trusted ears of one of the biggest rock acts of the modern era is a case study in serendipity well-played. Shortly after love relocated Coke – still a struggling musician – from his American home to France in 1980, a friend who had relocated to Los Angeles called him up. That friend, J.P. Plunier (who now owns Everloving Records), had started managing a singer/songwriter Ben Harper and needed someone with a European license to drive the band around on their first European tour. Coke obliged and, trustworthy and capable soul that he is, was promoted to tour manager within the first week. With the new role came responsibility to help with the backline, to help with the monitor mix, and to mix the band at FOH.

“All of this was a very ‘seat-of-the-pants’ learning experience,” Coke laughed. “There was lots of trial and error… oh yeah, lots of error! [laughs] My ears and previous music experiences helped me a lot, as did several sound engineers that I met along the way. After two years, I made the decision to stop the road manager duties and concentrate on sound engineering, which I was (and still am) truly passionate about.” Coke observed that the musical and cultural palette in Europe at the time was much more diverse than it was in the U.S. Mixing, both live and studio, was a wide open field with only a few key players. So in an indirect way, Europe was an exciting and encouraging place to live and work for someone with a good head on his shoulders, a musician’s ears, and a passion (though no formal training) for mixing.

Between then and now, Coke has worked with a broad array of musicians. He said, “My proudest moments are those I’ve spent together with incredibly talented musicians while they created or expressed music: waking up at 4 a.m. to sing with Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar; all the recordings and concerts playing Tablas with New York’s finest soprano saxophonist, Eric Person; co-producing Ben Harper’s second album, Fight For Your Mind and the subsequent tour; recording pianist Pete Drungle; recording, mixing and touring with French rock band, Noir Désir as well as the French singer, Alain Bashung; touring with Grammy-winning French band, Phoenix; and, of course, touring with The Black Crowes. And there are so many others. That’s just a start.”

Coke stumbled upon Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo after complaining to Marco de Fouquières of Dispatch/Dushow (the largest sound company in France) that there seemed to be no Mac-based sound analysis software. Fouquières alerted Coke to SpectraFoo, which is proudly and only Mac-based. “At the time, there was a huge shift in our approach to system installations with the arrival of the L-Acoustic line array, concurrent development of sound analysis software, and the way that sound analysis software was being applied in the field,” recalled Coke. “Every system tech here in France was using the same software, but I opted for SpectraFoo. I quickly recognized SpectraFoo to be a more precise measuring tool that proved equally useful in the studio environment. The Dolby Lake EQ corrections I make are the exact same frequencies Spectra Foo indicates, whereas the PC software frequencies at the time were generally off by several Hertz. This was a cause of consternation with several of my system techs. They went so far as to upgrade their ADDA audio interfaces… but still without achieving a more accurate reading!”

These days, Coke runs SpectraFoo on all of his tours. He uses it to align the mains, the subs, front fills, side hangs, and delays, and he uses it to analyze room acoustics and the room’s response to amplified sound. For both live and recording applications, Coke uses SpectraFoo to verify phase rotation and to visualize tonal balance. “SpectraFoo gives me a visual reference for what I’m hearing and can help me identify in real time what’s occurring acoustically,” he said. “It is an invaluable aid in live sound reinforcement because the working environment is extremely fluid and composed of constantly changing variables. As well, any changes in the sound are immediately perceived by the audience though perhaps not always consciously. I refer to a broad palette of tools in SpectraFoo from the moment I’m powered up and running in an empty venue until the end of the show and I’m measuring audience applause after the artist has departed the stage.”

Although The Black Crowes represent a return to straight-up rock ‘n’ roll and although Coke mixes them in that vein, he asserts that modern sound reinforcement equipment would not respond well to a retro approach to system tuning. “Live sound has evolved dramatically in the past twenty years. As the precision of FOH sound systems has increased, the room for error has decreased. Nowadays, speaker technology and system tuning can be very unforgiving to a bad sounding mix – or even a mediocre sounding one. In our modern day-to-day lives of digitized mp3 sound and small speakers, going to a rock concert can and should be a felt experience. SpectraFoo helps me dial in that experience quickly by providing an accurate visualization of what my ears are hearing, thereby complementing my aural understanding with a purely scientific visual reference.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

FOH ENGINEER BOB COKE USES METRIC HALO’S SPECTRAFOO TO MIX THE BLACK CROWES

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – OCTOBER 2013: When we caught up with him, Bob Coke was drawing on his decades of FOH experience to mix The Black Crowes with the help of Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo sound analysis software as the band toured the U.S. in the fall of 2013. The path that took Coke from a “penniless” musician with proficiency on Indian Tablas, sarod, and acoustic guitar to the trusted ears of one of the biggest rock acts of the modern era is a case study in serendipity well-played. Shortly after love relocated Coke – still a struggling musician – from his American home to France in 1980, a friend who had relocated to Los Angeles called him up. That friend, J.P. Plunier (who now owns Everloving Records), had started managing a singer/songwriter Ben Harper and needed someone with a European license to drive the band around on their first European tour. Coke obliged and, trustworthy and capable soul that he is, was promoted to tour manager within the first week. With the new role came responsibility to help with the backline, to help with the monitor mix, and to mix the band at FOH.

“All of this was a very ‘seat-of-the-pants’ learning experience,” Coke laughed. “There was lots of trial and error… oh yeah, lots of error! [laughs] My ears and previous music experiences helped me a lot, as did several sound engineers that I met along the way. After two years, I made the decision to stop the road manager duties and concentrate on sound engineering, which I was (and still am) truly passionate about.” Coke observed that the musical and cultural palette in Europe at the time was much more diverse than it was in the U.S. Mixing, both live and studio, was a wide open field with only a few key players. So in an indirect way, Europe was an exciting and encouraging place to live and work for someone with a good head on his shoulders, a musician’s ears, and a passion (though no formal training) for mixing.

Between then and now, Coke has worked with a broad array of musicians. He said, “My proudest moments are those I’ve spent together with incredibly talented musicians while they created or expressed music: waking up at 4 a.m. to sing with Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar; all the recordings and concerts playing Tablas with New York’s finest soprano saxophonist, Eric Person; co-producing Ben Harper’s second album, Fight For Your Mind and the subsequent tour; recording pianist Pete Drungle; recording, mixing and touring with French rock band, Noir Désir as well as the French singer, Alain Bashung; touring with Grammy-winning French band, Phoenix; and, of course, touring with The Black Crowes. And there are so many others. That’s just a start.”

Coke stumbled upon Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo after complaining to Marco de Fouquières of Dispatch/Dushow (the largest sound company in France) that there seemed to be no Mac-based sound analysis software. Fouquières alerted Coke to SpectraFoo, which is proudly and only Mac-based. “At the time, there was a huge shift in our approach to system installations with the arrival of the L-Acoustic line array, concurrent development of sound analysis software, and the way that sound analysis software was being applied in the field,” recalled Coke. “Every system tech here in France was using the same software, but I opted for SpectraFoo. I quickly recognized SpectraFoo to be a more precise measuring tool that proved equally useful in the studio environment. The Dolby Lake EQ corrections I make are the exact same frequencies Spectra Foo indicates, whereas the PC software frequencies at the time were generally off by several Hertz. This was a cause of consternation with several of my system techs. They went so far as to upgrade their ADDA audio interfaces… but still without achieving a more accurate reading!”

These days, Coke runs SpectraFoo on all of his tours. He uses it to align the mains, the subs, front fills, side hangs, and delays, and he uses it to analyze room acoustics and the room’s response to amplified sound. For both live and recording applications, Coke uses SpectraFoo to verify phase rotation and to visualize tonal balance. “SpectraFoo gives me a visual reference for what I’m hearing and can help me identify in real time what’s occurring acoustically,” he said. “It is an invaluable aid in live sound reinforcement because the working environment is extremely fluid and composed of constantly changing variables. As well, any changes in the sound are immediately perceived by the audience though perhaps not always consciously. I refer to a broad palette of tools in SpectraFoo from the moment I’m powered up and running in an empty venue until the end of the show and I’m measuring audience applause after the artist has departed the stage.”

Although The Black Crowes represent a return to straight-up rock ‘n’ roll and although Coke mixes them in that vein, he asserts that modern sound reinforcement equipment would not respond well to a retro approach to system tuning. “Live sound has evolved dramatically in the past twenty years. As the precision of FOH sound systems has increased, the room for error has decreased. Nowadays, speaker technology and system tuning can be very unforgiving to a bad sounding mix – or even a mediocre sounding one. In our modern day-to-day lives of digitized mp3 sound and small speakers, going to a rock concert can and should be a felt experience. SpectraFoo helps me dial in that experience quickly by providing an accurate visualization of what my ears are hearing, thereby complementing my aural understanding with a purely scientific visual reference.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

DPA Microphones Are Chosen For New Jazz Venue The Standard

Danish Jazz legend, producer and internationally acclaimed pianist Niels Lan Doky has teamed up with Claus Meyer, co-owner of the Michelin-starred noma restaurant, to launch The Standard, a new Jazz club in Copenhagen that includes two bars and three world-class restaurants.

Officially opened on October 3rd, 2013, The Standard’s audio equipment list highlights another famous Danish name – DPA Microphones.

“We have between 10 and 15 DPA microphones permanently in the venue and we will be hiring in more when larger ensembles are playing,” says Niels Lan Doky, who is musical director of the new venue. “When our stage was completed in September we conducted a series of rehearsals and tests on site with the DPA team to determine exactly which microphones we needed. The list, which is exclusively DPA, includes various d:vote™ 4099 Instrument Microphones and a selection of d:dicate™ 4011 and 4006 Recording Microphones.”

As The Standard features vocalists as well as instrumentalists, Doky and his team have also invested in a new DPA d:facto™ Vocal Microphone that will be made available to every singer performing at the club.

“We are very excited about this microphone, which is the perfect microphone for us,” Doky says. “Our highly experienced house sound engineer, Jonas Nakel, tried it and was very impressed because it has the trademark qualities of DPA, coupled with the specific needs of a vocal mic.”

The choice of DPA Microphones reflects Doky’s philosophy that, at The Standard, it is the quality of the performance, the music that emanates from the stage, the sound of the room and the overall experience shared by the musicians and audience that matters, not the reputation or image of the artist performing.

“We are aiming to capture the timeless values that define jazz and that the greatest artists in jazz have in common,” Doky explains. “What counts is the quality of the music performed, so we will be working with incoming artists to help them prepare and enhance their shows in order to go beyond themselves and reach new levels of artistry. We also have a great sounding room with top level equipment and this is a very important part of the equation because although we are creating a classic jazz atmosphere, we are also ensuring that the room’s equipment and acoustics reflect professional recording studio standards so that we can give our audiences an exceptional sonic experience.”

Doky adds that choosing DPA was an easy decision for him to make as he already owns a selection of DPA 4011 and 4021 microphones that he uses for all his concerts and recordings.

“I have never done a recording without a large selection of DPAs,” he says. “They are the most transparent and precise microphones I know because what you put in is exactly what you get out at the other end of the chain. In the old days people didn’t always appreciate this as they were used to hearing the transformed and sometimes aesthetically altered sound that many other microphones produced. However, in our increasingly technically sophisticated world, especially in the world of A/V production, it is very important to get as close as possible to a natural sound. I believe that was DPA’s vision from the start and I am glad that they have stubbornly stuck to it.”

Doky has an elegant touch when it comes to studio work and his recordings are renowned for their superior technical quality. His latest album, Scandinavian Standards, will be released on Parlophone to tie in with the opening of the new club, which will host an album launch party.

“Like all my albums, Scandinavian Standards was recorded using DPA microphones,” Doky says. “I play piano and, given how hard it is to record and amplify that instrument, I don’t think the quality of my recordings would have been possible without the clarity and precision of my loyal travel companions, my DPA microphones.”

The opening of The Standard brings the worlds of gastronomy and music into close orbit and focuses attention on Copenhagen’s unique jazz history, which dates back to the 1950’s when many American ex-patriot jazz legends settled there.

“We take deep pride in Copenhagen’s jazz legacy and we want to reflect it in The Standard’s creative choices and decisions whenever possible,” Niels Lan Doky says. “We will be looking to bring in dynamic, vibrant and engaged jazz artists who know how to be daring and courageous without compromising integrity and quality.”

-ends-

About DPA
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to provide you – whether you’re in live sound, recording, theater or broadcast – with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for your tasks. DPA takes no shortcuts in the design processes nor makes any compromises in manufacturing, which is all done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability, and above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound.
For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

IDEAL ACOUSTICAL ENVIRONMENT MEETS 48-CHANNEL API 1608 AT STRANGE WEATHER STUDIOS

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK: With an API 1608 console, a jaw-dropping collection of analog equipment, and a straight-up rock ‘n roll recording vibe, Brooklyn’s Strange Weather studio is growing at an incredible rate. A move to a larger space with custom acoustical design by Wes Lachot of Wes Lachot Design is destined to help Strange Weather thrive in the years and decades to come.

In addition to Lachot’s accurate acoustic design and owner Marc Alan Goodman’s ever-growing collection of gear and his valued partner Daniel Schlett, the new space benefits from an expanded API 1608 analog console with 48 fully-automated channels and 24 expansion slots for API 500 Series modules. But beyond the particulars, the studio’s greatest strength derives from the cohesion of its acoustical, electrical, and creative environments.

Lachot takes a broad and balanced perspective to studio design and recognizes that a lot of what makes Strange Weather successful is out of his hands. “The most important component of a successful recording studio is the talent, and Marc is at the hub of a vibrant creative community,” he said. “They have the songs, the instruments, and the performances that have the potential to become enduring recordings. After the talent, the acoustics are most important. That’s coming from an acoustic designer of course, but if the acoustics aren’t there, then the musicians don’t feel right and the performance suffers. The accuracy of the acoustics on both sides of the glass also impact how well a performance is captured and how well it translates. After the acoustics, the console is the next critical component because everything will travel through it multiple times.”

Goodman acquired Strange Weather’s original API 1608 in 2008. “The idea of having something new and reliable with an honest vintage sound was very appealing,” he said. “I love the simplicity of the API 1608. It has eight aux’s, eight busses, and no crazy routing. Unlike everything else that’s being made today, it’s not overbuilt. And of course the sound is very attractive, especially to our mostly rock-based clientele.”

Lachot regularly recommends API consoles to his clients. “Our rooms are very quiet and very accurate,” he said. “When we’re finally done and we fire up the tunes, the quality of the console is obvious. And if the quality of the console isn’t there, it can be a brutal realization. API’s all-discrete analog consoles have a hugeness, clarity, and depth that’s unbeatable. And the people at API are great to work with. They stand behind their products.”

Because the API 1608 is expandable, Goodman was able to grow his console to its current 48 channel form, and even included an additional bucket to accommodate 16 additional 500-Series slots. “If anyone can fill those slots up fast, it’s Marc,” Lachot joked.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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