A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive of the NAMM Newslink Category

RASCAL FLATTS FOH ENGINEER JONATHAN LOESER RELIES ON METRIC HALO SPECTRAFOO SOUND ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA: In only a dozen years, Jonathan Loeser has risen from newly-minted SAE Institute graduate to FOH engineer for multi-platinum country act Rascal Flatts. Along the way, he has worked as FOH engineer & production manager for Olivia Newton-John, FOH & monitor engineer for Prince’s “Welcome 2 America” tour, and FOH Engineer for Colbie Caillat’s 2011 Tour. The amiable engineer secured those gigs by delivering consistently excellent results, largely free of hiccups or hassles, through careful planning. One of his go-to tricks is careful metering and sound analysis. On the recommendation of colleagues, he recently upgraded to Metric Halo’s sound analysis software, SpectraFoo, which is paired with his Metric Halo LIO-8 interface, itself recently upgraded to include preamps.

“I originally purchased the LIO-8 to give myself a serious, professional interface that would be flexible enough to do anything I needed it to do,” said Loeser. “Prior to that, my converter was cheap. It felt like it was going to break in my hand. The LIO-8, together with its companion MIO Console software, gives me all of the routing and flexibility I need.” Although he had previously used a wireless DBX measurement microphone with line-level output, for the new Rascal Flatts tour, Loeser wanted to expand his monitoring options. “I added the mic preamp option for the LIO-8, which now gives me even more flexibility and portability.”

Previously, Loeser had used sound analysis software primarily for its transfer function. “With SpectraFoo, I’m still able to do that, of course, but I’m also able to do so much more,” he said. “SpectraFoo is very flexible. For example, when I do a time capture, I can move the point that I want to correlate with, which makes it a much more useful tool. Once I learned how to compose and save snapshot window sets, I configured SpectraFoo to show me everything I want to see for tuning and, separately, for the actual show.” Part of that functionality includes making up for his Studer Vista 5’s seeming only weakness: metering.

Tuning the system requires dealing with Rascal Flatts’ somewhat unconventional stage setup. “We have an extensive thrust, and there’s an apron in front of the stage that makes it hard to fill the gaps that it creates,” Loeser explained. “I have some under-hangs that do the trick, but they are touchy. For this tour, I’ve added two Audix measurement mics. During system tuning, I’m able to place them in the questionable zone of seating. Then, using SpectraFoo, I can actually see what the down-fills are doing. That’s critical because squeezing good vocal volume out when the main vocal mic is in front of the PA is my biggest potential headache.”

During tuning, Loeser’s custom SpectraFoo screen includes full-frequency transfer functions on the wireless RTA mic, as well as on the thrust mics. He also includes high-resolution, low-frequency transfer functions to properly align the subwoofers. For the show itself, Loeser flips to another custom SpectraFoo screen. He moves the Audix microphones to a near-audience position on stage that is also used by the monitor engineer for crowd capture. In addition to watching the transfer functions for those microphones, Loeser also takes a feed from the Vista 5 that parallels his send to the PA and gives it a big, fat meter in SpectraFoo.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

DIVERSITY FIN ANTENNA ON TOUR WITH BRYAN ADAMS

VANCOUVER, CANADA – JULY 2013: Veteran monitor mixer and founder of Vancouver-based audio company Gearforce, Robert Nevalainen ensures the many channels of wireless audio systems used on Bryan Adams’ international tours function flawlessly. After reading an article on polarization diversity for wireless microphone antennas, Nevalainen decided to evaluate the Diversity Fin cross-polarized antenna, from RF Venue, against other directional antennas while on a six-city tour through Australia. “We did an A to B type test comparing the Diversity Fin against our stock Shure and Sennheiser systems, and were quite impressed,” Nevalainen remembers.

“Gearforce supplies Bryan Adams with our universal tour kit which now includes RF Venue’s Diversity Fin,” says Nevalainen. “The kit also includes seven wireless channels using Shure UHRF receivers and UA845 amplifiers. Both Adams and lead guitarist Keith Scott use UR-1 body-pack transmitters with U845 combiners. For personal wireless monitoring they use Shure PSM1000s with a PA821A combiner.”

“I carry this exact same equipment around the world with me. So, when we change out a piece, its quite easy to see how well it works, because everything is known,” Nevalainen states. “In addition to its reliability and predictability, the Diversity Fin worked well because of its compact footprint in our congested left stage area. We were also quite pleased with the reduction in switching noise. The antenna basically forces the diversity receiver to choose between signals less frequently, and as a result you get more silent switching.”

Nevalainen has just returned from a series of June stadium shows in Denmark. “We have now been using the Diversity Fin exclusively with Bryan’s guitar setup,” he reports. “It has really simplified our setup and given us very reliable and predictable directional antenna coverage.”

ABOUT RF VENUE RF Venue manufactures wireless audio equipment including remote antennas, RF distribution equipment, and cable assemblies. The company’s primary antenna products include the interference mitigating RF Spotlight, the lightweight foldable helical antenna CP Beam, and the polarization diversity antenna dubbed Diversity Fin. For more information visit: www.RFvenue.com

METRIC HALO ANNOUNCES 2013 SUMMER SALE: BEST PRICES EVER

WHAT: Metric Halo announces their 2013 Summer Sale Extravaganza, running now until September 15, 2013. Featuring the best deals ever offered on Metric Halo’s award-winning products, the 2013 Summer Sale provides you with an excellent opportunity to experience Metric Halo’s legendary quality first-hand.

A 30-day, money-back guarantee backs Metric Halo’s hardware products so you can try them out in your studio with no risk. Metric Halo also provides a free 30-day demo for its software products, so you can try before you buy.

WHY: If you’ve been lusting after a Metric Halo interface, but it was just beyond your reach, Metric Halo’s announcement of the 2013 Summer Sale is great news for you!

WHO: Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and hardware.

WHEN: Now until September 15, 2013

WHERE: Metric Halo products are available during the Summer Sale from authorized dealers worldwide (http://mhsecure.com/metric_halo/buy/dealers.html) and direct from Metric Halo (https://www.mhsecure.com/mhdirect/home.php)

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

IMT Joins AT&T Partner Exchange as Platinum Solution Provider

Integrated Media Technologies to Provide Customized AT&T Solutions

 

 

 

Integrated Media Technologies, Inc. (IMT) has joined the AT&T* Partner Exchange (sm) reseller program as a Platinum Solution Provider and is now authorized to resell services from one of the leading worldwide providers of IP-based communications to businesses. Bundling AT&T solutions with IMT’s solutions will provide innovative, customized choices for customers.

“We can help our clients further now by providing the network piece between facilities and data centers,” commented IMT’s Chandos Mahon, VP Sales of the company’s new Interactive Video Learning division.  “We can resell AT&T cloud services in particular, which will further help IMT provide optimum backup and archiving for our customers, which is ideal for the media and entertainment industry.”

 

 

 

 

 

“We welcome IMT to the AT&T Partner Exchange. Our collaboration will enable IMT experts to bundle our innovative services with their in-depth knowledge to deliver tailor-made solutions to businesses,” said Randall Porter, Vice President, Sales and Business Development, Emerging Business Markets, AT&T Business Solutions.

IMT will initially resell the following solutions with additional solutions to be added this year:

AT&T Synaptic Compute as a Service (sm) – offers on-demand virtual machines and associated networking resources in a self-service, pay-as-you-go model.

AT&T Synaptic Storage as a Service (sm)- provides highly-secure, virtualized storage that adaptively scales to any size your customers need, and is accessible from virtually any device, nearly anywhere.

AT&T Synaptic Platform as a Service (sm) – a complete development environment that allows users to build custom applications and bring them online quickly and efficiently.

AT&T Virtual Private Network Service – provides the foundation that connects the main office, data centers, branch offices, and remote and mobile workers to each other, and to the applications they need to be productive.

AT&T Managed Internet Service
– high-speed dedicated Internet access, with the features businesses need to connect with customers, partners, and employees.

AT&T Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Private Network Transport – - businesses can couple their AT&T Managed Internet Service with a point-to-point, network-based connection for increased security and availability.

AT&T IP Flexible Reach – a managed Voice over IP communication solution that supports inbound and outbound calling on your data network, providing local, long distance, and international calling for U.S. sites.

*AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc.

ABOUT INTEGRATED MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES
Integrated Media Technologies Inc. (IMT) is a digital media and technology company with offices in Los Angeles, San Jose, Dallas, and NYC.  In 2011, Inc. Magazine ranked IMT as the 25th fastest growing private company in the Technology Services industry.  IMT serves the broadcast, telecommunications, media & entertainment, IT, institutional, commercial real estate and hospitality sectors with a broad range of solutions designed to drive new value and efficiencies from technology.

Learn more at: http://www.imtglobalinc.com tel: 877.761.9770

DiGiCo SD10 Tames Mega Monitor Mixes On Frampton’s ‘Guitar Circus’

Peter Frampton reclaims his guitar throne on the blockbuster ‘Frampton’s Guitar Circus’ tour, which kicked off at the end of May in Nashville, TN at the Ryman Auditorium. The guitarist-turned-frontman/singer is sharing the stage and going toe-to-toe with a dizzying array of axemen on the summer outing including Steve Cropper, Dean DeLeo (Stone Temple Pilots), Don Felder (formerly of The Eagles), Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), Vince Gill, David Hidalgo (Los Lobos), Davy Knowles, Roger McGuinn (founder/lead guitarist of the BYRDS), Richard Thompson, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Vinnie Moore (UFO) and Rick Nielsen (Cheap Trick), with B.B. King, Steve Lukather, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Sonny Landreth trading off opening the shows.

With Clair Global providing the consoles and a full stage package, Frampton engineer Matt Fitzgerald—who has worked with Frampton for the past four years, and with Ringo Starr and Blue Man Group prior—kicked off the tour with a new audio footprint at monitor world to handle all of the ramped-up monitoring requirements. Fitzgerald chose a DiGiCo SD10 for Frampton’s 5-piece band and the guest guitarists.

Heading into rehearsals with the new system, Fitzgerald was a bit hesitant at first, but his fears were allayed once he powered up on day one. “This was my first experience using one of the new SD consoles in-depth,” he explains. “I’d had lots of mixing experience on a D5 working with opening acts. But for this summer tour, I opted in favor of a smaller footprint and more flexible solution by trading up two linked digital desks that I was using prior for an SD10. Not only was it difficult mixing inputs between the two desks, but it was sluggish also as I had to treat each one as an individual mixing surface.

“Obviously making a big switch was a bit nerve-wracking. Peter’s the kind of guy that wants to be able to walk into rehearsal and just go. I did a lot of research and spent time with DiGiCo’s Ryan Shelton in Nashville and worked with the offline software to build my big session files. We had a decent amount of rehearsal time, about two weeks, because the band was learning the other guitar players’ material, so that was of huge benefit to me. I was able to get really comfortable on the desk, storing snapshots, making scene-to-scene files, etc. Literally after the first day, I was shocked and awed at how easy it was to get around on the desk and how small the learning curve was. I felt like a burden was lifted off my shoulders and I was able to just concentrate on mixing, not on the new gear. I was really blown away by the desk and really liked that everything was laid out so naturally. The buttons were right where I needed them, not to mention that the features are fantastic and you can have the channel strip wherever you want and create the desk to make it the way you want it to be. It’s really comfortable and I really enjoy it.”

With all of our band on Westone ES2 in-ears, Fitzgerald was looking at a lot of variables with the guest guitarists—some would be on ears, some on wedges; some had big stereo rigs and others had simple combo amps, acoustic guitars, etc. “I wanted to have a lot more flexibility and room to grow. With the SD10, I’m able to build a bigger show file as well as have extra wedge and ear mixes built-in. And it’s been awesome as far as changing the layout of the desk from show to show. For instance, we just played with Steve Cropper, who uses wedges, and I was able to move my wedge mixes to my top layer and restructure my file, and it was so cool and easy.”

Fitzgerald makes use of all of the onboard effects from the desk: reverbs for drums, acoustic guitars and keys, slap delays for vocals, plus a bit of multiband compression for vocals and DiGiTuBes on the bass for a little bit of drive. The only external effects he’s employing is an Eventide H3000 harmonizer for the acoustic guitars.

One of the challenges is creating a controlled environment on a day-to-day basis, blending the audience mics and stage sounds in everyone’s in-ears. “The tonality, spaciousness and imaging are really great and big-sounding on this desk. There’s a real clarity to the sound. Any inputs like Peter’s LCR Marshall and stereo Leslies for is his guitar rig, the Hammond organs and keyboards that are hard-panned left and right, sound so clear and natural. The imaging is excellent and sounds like you don’t have ears in at all. I’m able to fine tune the EQ of the audience mics to each room, so the audience sounds the same even though you’re in an arena, theater, or event hall… When someone in the audience yells in between songs I want Peter to be able to look into the audience and know where and who is yelling and make eye contact with them. With the SD10s imaging and clarity I can pan audience mics exactly where I want. It’s as if I’m mixing the audience just as much as I mix the band. Peter’s mix is a very full range, dynamic mix of the entire band with his inputs just top,” he adds. “He wants to hear everybody and what they’re playing. If someone solos I ride my programed control groups to give them a nudge in his ears so he hears all important parts of the songs…”

With the tour well underway, the feedback on the new console among band and front man has been unanimously positive. “This band is so great to work with because they respect my input and ideas as we move forward with this new console. I try to open up the spectrum in their ears and create a ceiling for them instead of monaural mixes. I want it to sound as natural as possible and at the same time have full control of what’s going on onstage so I’ve created a big open stereo spectrum with Peter in middle and the guitar players panned on each side to create that image of what’s really going on onstage. If you take your ears out, that’s what it’ll sound like. And the fact that I’m able to recreate all of this in the in-ear monitors and have it sound so natural is really cool.

“And Peter, being an audio guy himself is great to work with, he is very particular about his sound,” Fitzgerald continues. “He’s involved in a lot of choices in the audio spectrum and loves this desk, too. He’s blown away with it and loving the sound of the desk in his ears. Peter and his band are all on in-ears monitors and we have a couple of subs onstage for feel. I’m able to have a nice, controlled environment and a lot of good mixing. So far, it’s been a seamless transition and awesome!”

“This DiGiCo desk is amazingly ‘analog’ sounding,” raves Frampton. “It’s very warm and, with its full band width, has incredible smooth high-end response. Matt can run monitors and multi-track record every show with ease. This is due to the foresight of design. It’s like not having ‘ears’ in but instead, listening to a really great pair of studio monitors. But… I’m playing live on stage!”

The variety of the material from night to night and city to city has kept Fitzgerald on his toes and had made for a musically stimulating tour. “The fact that we’re doing both Peter’s material but also songs from the other guitarists, has been a bit of extra work for me and the band, but it’s been really fun overall. It’s made for an exciting, unique and fun tour. Again, having the flexibility on this desk has allowed me to simply have fun mixing… Needless to say, I’m really in love with this desk.”

Alicia Keys Sets The World On Fire With DiGiCo & Clair Global

With over 50 international dates on the horizon in support of her latest outing Girl on Fire, Grammy award winning artist Alicia Keys has surrounded herself with an adept team of engineers with support from Clair Global and DiGiCo mixing systems. With a total of five SD racks (two for FOH, two for monitors, and one for opening artist, Miguel), they’re also carrying a pair of SD10s (one at FOH and monitor world) to handle the eight-member band including the headliner. Newly positioned at FOH is Tim Colvard, who took over the European leg of the tour. Although Colvard’s employed DiGiCo consoles for many of his clients international tours, this was his first time on an SD10 (as well as his debut outing with both the artist and with Clair Global). He joins Clair FOH tech Randy Weinholtz and monitor mixmaster Antonio Luna for the already-in- progress global tour.

The challenge of a one-day rehearsal prior to his first live show could’ve been cause for a bit of nail-biting. However, Colvard’s extensive previous hands-on experience on an SD7 with Madonna, Usher and others lent itself to getting up and running quickly on the new console and Keys’ eight-piece outfit, comprised of keys, bass, drums, guitar, and a trio of background singers.

“A phone conversation with Alicia convinced me that she really cares about her sound,” says Colvard. “And being intrigued by her music made joining an already-in-progress tour an easy decision. With Alicia having one of the most powerful and dynamic voices in the industry, DiGiCo’s dynamic EQ really came in handy for smoothing everything out, especially when she’s really belting it out in the high-end. Also, I’m maximizing all of the dynamic compression available on the SD10 for all of the Pro Tools channels.

“It is also important for me to use snapshots, which I time to run consecutively. This allows me to do certain mutes on the piano, particularly when it goes down the lift in the middle of the song and gets disconnected, as well as for other microphones in different parts at the stage. Using these features gives me more time to mix instead of trying to remember what inputs should be muted or un-muted.”

Colvard’s also carrying a rack of external effects, including a TC Electronic 2290, TC D2, Eventide H3000 ES, a couple of Yamaha 990s and a Lexicon 960L, which gives him “a variety to cover most algorithms needed to do duplicate the album effects.”

“We love the flexibility of the SD10 desk,” adds Weinholtz. “The dynamic EQ is really nice and having the ability to create a fader bank of multiple input/outputs, and whatever your brain can think of, is great.”

But perhaps the most interesting aspect of the tour’s audio specs is Antonio Luna’s employment of an Aviom personal monitor mixing system—typically found in House of Worship, theatre and studio settings primarily, but not so much in touring. Luna’s using this in tandem with his SD10 to allow the band to customize and control their own individualized monitoring needs.

“The Aviom has been pretty cool,” he says. “I didn’t think I’d ever use it again after Aerosmith in 2009 but the musical director wanted to and so we figured out a way to incorporate it and it’s been working well since day one. I’m able to send 16 sends to the primary band members, who are all able to mix themselves, which means I get left alone to mix the three background vocalists and the singer. The band doesn’t ask me for anything during the show, so I can concentrate 100% on the artist. I would assume there are other engineers out there using Aviom, although I just don’t know anyone off-hand who’s doing it. It’s definitely made my job easier and I’m still able to deliver quality mixes to the band via that source. The band seems really happy with it, and if they’re happy I’m happy.”

Concentrating on Alicia, Luna keeps the effects to a minimum, relying mostly on the internal effects, with the exception of a TC Electronics M4000 plug-in via AES at 96kHz. “That reverb sounds really good on her vocal and we really like it. But everything else I’m using with her is internal. I find I use a lot of compression on her vocals. She has a lot of dynamic range, so I need to take that down a little bit to make it fit when she’s singing loud or soft. Because she’s primarily a piano player, the mix is very important. The piano can easily get lost or washed out if you have too much vocal or too much ambient sound. So the vocal and piano are the important parts of the mix, and the rest follows those two key elements. I make sure I can always hear the vocal and the piano, and if I can always hear the vocal and the piano, with the band fitting in nicely underneath, we’re going to have a great day!”

They’re also tracking 80 inputs on Nuendo at monitor world and FOH and 80 channels of Pro Tools to split off the stage racks.

Another technological advance on the tour is the use of a Signal Hound RF Spectrum Analyzer. “When we were deciding the gear spec, Scott Evans introduced me to the product and we decided to get one for the tour,” says Luna. “We’re getting really good results and the manufacturer has been fantastic. They’re excited for the feedback because apparently no one in our industry is using it, so it’s kinda cool to be breaking new ground like that.”

Both the artist and management have been happy with the production, both onstage and off…. And are verbal about it. “We’re getting a lot of compliments,” Luna offers, “and a couple of shows ago Alicia said it sounded wonderful at soundcheck… I’m not used to getting that kind of positive feedback from artists, so it’s refreshing, especially coming from Alicia, because she’s such an awesome talent.

“Other than that I’m really grateful that I’ve got a good relationship with the vendors, not just with sound company, Clair Global, but with DiGiCo as well,” continues Luna. “It’s a killer combination for service. I feel confident that no matter where I am in the world, if I need something, it’s going to happen. Thanks to both Clair and DiGiCo for helping me out on this tour… it’s very been appreciated.”

“In today’s touring industry where cost of gear and truck and rack space are ongoing issues,” adds Colvard, “it’s important to have a console that can solve many of these challenges, the DiGiCo SD10 meets all of the needs for getting on the road—from the sonics of the sound to the dynamic EQ, dynamic multi-band compression overdrive [DiGiTubes] and delay on channels, to its great gates and ducking capabilities. Having these tools makes the selection of DiGiCo consoles live an easy choice for me.”

Photo Credit Tim Colvard: Kathy Beer

DiGiCo SD8 Brings Oktophonie Opus To Light At NYC’s Park Avenue Armory

Karlheinz Stockhausen‘s electronic masterpiece OKTOPHONIE made its New York premier at the end of March at Park Avenue Armory in Manhattan. Stockhausen was a compositional pioneer who grappled with spatial music as he bent the rules and redefined the listening experience. The German composer’s magnum opus “Licht” (or “Light”) OKTOPHONIE is a trailblazing electronic musical experience where the audience is surrounded by eight groups of loudspeakers, enveloping them in a sonic environment. The piece was performed by Kathinka Pasveer, an early Stockhausen collaborator, and Igor Kavulek who has been Stockhausen’s personal sound technician since 1998. A DiGiCo SD8 and Meyer sound system was specified by Kavulek for the show and provided by Production Resources Group.

Staging the work as the composer originally intended—in outer space—artist Rirkrit Tiravanija was commissioned by the Armory to create a ritualized lunar experience, a floating seating installation within the Armory’s soaring drill hall that heightens the listeners’ octophonic experience and transports them to another realm. The audience donned white cloaks for the journey, carried along by the all-encompassing score, which was broadcast from the SD8 console placed at center stage.

Pasveer has worked with DiGiCo consoles (SD7s, SD8s and D5s) over the last several years on previous performances around the globe and has been impressed with their ease of use, flexibility and reliability.

“Igor always specifies DiGiCo consoles and Meyer loudspeakers on our technical rider because they sound fantastic together and translate the music the way the composer wanted it to be heard,” explains Pasveer. “Oktophonie encompasses 64 channels that were mixed down to eight tracks, which were totally spacialized and played back from a laptop into the console. This very simple but sophisticated sound system gave us huge sound but was not too loud. The DiGiCo SD8 being so compact and flexible is very easy to work with and we use it often for our large productions. You can set it up exactly the way you like and individualize all the channels very easily. And the sound was so beautiful in the Armory. I think everyone was impressed by the sound and sound quality.”

About Park Avenue Armory
Part palace, part industrial shed, Park Avenue Armory fills a critical void in the cultural ecology of New York by enabling artists to create—and audiences to experience—unconventional work that cannot be mounted in traditional performance halls and museums. With its soaring 55,000-square-foot Wade Thompson Drill Hall—reminiscent of 19th-century European train stations—and array of exuberant period rooms, the Armory offers a new platform for creativity across all art forms. Since September 2007—Aaron Young’s Greeting Card, a 9,216-square-foot “action” painting created by the burned-out tire marks of ten choreographed motorcycles—the Armory has organized a series of immersive performances, installations, and works of art that have drawn critical and popular attention. Among the highlights are: Bernd Zimmermann’s harrowing Die Soldaten, in which the audience moved “through the music”; the unprecedented six-week residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company, in their own theater rebuilt in the drill hall; a massive digital sound and video environment by Ryoji Ikeda; a sprawling, gauzy, multisensory labyrinth created by Ernesto Neto; the final performances of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company; and the New York Philharmonic performing Stockhausen’s Gruppen with three orchestras surrounding the audience. The most recent project was the event of a thread, a site-specific installation by Ann Hamilton.

DiGiCo-Driven Broadway Shows Take Home Coveted TONY Awards

Building on the success of the DiGiCo D5T, still in current use on shows such as Cinderella, SD7T consoles have become a mainstay in the audio trenches on Broadway and in the West End (UK) for many a year, with their potently powerful hardware, Stealth engine and theatre software kit capable of handling the most intricate demands of theatre audio today. This June, a slew of the newest productions utilizing DiGiCo consoles took home coveted 2013 TONY Awards.

Using an DiGiCo SD7T:
Kinky Boots – Best Musical; Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical (Billy Porter); Best Choreography (Jerry Mitchell); Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics, Cyndi Lauper); Best Sound Design of a Musical (John Shivers); Best Orchestrations (Stephen Oremus).

Pippin – Best Revival of a Musical; Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical (Patina Miller); Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical (Andrea Martin); Best Direction of a Musical (Diane Paulus).

Matilda The Musical – Best Book of a Musical; Best Scenic Design of a Musical (Rob Howell); Best Lighting Design of a Musical (Hugh Vanstone); Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical (Gabriel Ebert).

Since his involvement designing The Lion King for Singapore in 2010, John Shivers has been using DiGiCo SD7Ts on just about every show since. The award-winning sound designer says the console offers a lot of flexibility, especially with the “T” software, which he says brings features and functionality specific to their needs on theatrical productions as well as a solid sounding foundation in a very compact package. 



“The SD7T software has added these very beneficial features thanks to [award-winning sound designer] Andrew Bruce’s involvement in the development. Having onboard compression, gating and delay—along with the programmability and recallability of those parameters on every channel—opens up possibilities that you just can’t have with an analog console. It’s definitely been an upgrade for us from that standpoint. A positive byproduct has definitely been the size of the console, which allows you to get into smaller spaces and require less seats be removed and has served as a large financial windfall for producers. For me, from a purely creative and design standpoint, it’s about the capabilities of the console. I’m not one to follow the crowd necessarily, but the SD7T has become a standard of our industry and the reason everybody’s using them seems clear. It has proven itself to be a very capable and reliable console.”

Additionally, Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella, which utilized DiGiCo’s 5DT, was awarded Best Costume Design of a Musical (William Ivey Long).

To discover more about DiGiCo’s line of theatre-ready digital consoles, please visit: www.digico.biz

Rollin’ Across The Globe With Limp Bizkit, Rat Sound & DiGiCo

After two decades and over 40 million albums sold worldwide, Limp Bizkit is back with a new lineup, a new album (Stampede of the Disco Elephants) and a new tour hitting mid-sized venues in the US and Europe through the summer. Rat Sound is handling the production, consisting of a DiGiCo SD5 and a 16-input SD Mini Rack at FOH with a 56-input SD Stage Rack. 

Engineer Bryan Worthen spec’d the SD5 for the tour, following its use on a string of shows with the Foo Fighters promoting frontman Dave Grohl’s “Sound City” documentary.

“I’ve used the D5 extensively with the Foo Fighters since 2005 and with Limp Bizkit since 2009,” he states. “Now that there is a next generation of D5 available, I chose the SD5 for the Sound City Players shows because it was so great on that. Consequently, I brought it with me over to Limp Bizkit world from RAT Sound. I don’t have very much experience using other digital consoles, but enough to be able to say that the DiGiCo sounds a ton better than most. It’s versatile and all 3 screens are functional, giving me the visual of an analog console. The layout makes it very easy to make things happen fast.”

“Limp Bizkit is 43 inputs from stage,” he explains. “In front, I have a Left and Right out, with subs running sometimes off an Aux. Subs off two Matrix outs (sometimes when subs are stereo) and I also have I/O’s for three Avalon 737 preamps and 4 channels of XL 42 mic pres, plus nearfields at left, right and sub outs.

Additionally, my recording is very minimal, used for virtual sound check purposes only. I’m recording out left and right to a hard disc recorder and multi-tracking to Logic with my MacBook Pro via the DiGiCo UB MADI interface.”

In the past year, Rat Sound has added DiGiCo SD5 and SD10 consoles to its rental inventory. “In our quest to provide our clients and engineer friends with the tools they desire and to maintain our focus on offering world class pro audio gear,” says president Dave Rat, “the SD5 and SD10 expand the diversity of premium consoles we offer. There are a lot of choices out there with a wide diversity of applications and preferences, and DiGiCo consoles are among the best of the bunch. The SD5 and SD10 are currently out on tour with Ed Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros as well as Limp Bizkit respectively.”

‘DiGiCo Master Series: From Power On to Expert’ Seminar Provides Comprehensive Educational Resources To Pro Audio Community

DiGiCo has long been committed to providing comprehensive educational resources and support to the professional audio community. Working in conjunction with its US distributor Group One Limited, it recently launched a series of educational training seminars—DiGiCo’s Master Series: From Power On to Expert—focused on showcasing DiGiCo’s current line of SD Series systems.

Full Sail Live, an award-winning School for Entertainment Media located in Orlando, Florida, hosted the inaugural seminar on April 23-24, 2013, facilitated by DiGiCo/Group One’s top audio trainers, National Sales Manager Matt Larson and Technical Sales & Support Ryan Shelton.

Over 90+ people were in attendance—comprising a diverse group of systems integrators, audio consultants, production companies, houses of worship and performing arts center operators, as well as Full Sail students and faculty. Over the course of two days, they were given in-depth tutorials with the opportunity to get hands-on with virtually all of DiGiCo’s SD Series consoles (SD5, SD Ten, SD11, 3xSD9s, and an SD8). The training covered the gamut from basic system setup and cabling to features and operation, as well as a hardware and software review. DiGiCo’s, new to be launched at Infocomm13, SD software (V621) was showcased on several of the consoles (adding 96KHz capacity for the SD9 and SD11 on Cat5E as well as a offering a new MADI Router for all SD consoles).

Industry veterans Howie Lindeman and Mark Frink were also in attendance to answer questions and to share their real-world, hands-on experience and road stories. Lindeman, who is currently on tour with The Elvis Presley Concert Tour, has mixed in many iconic studios from the Record Plant to the Hit Factory and on tour with Roberta Flack, Natalie Cole and many others. Frink is the former Technical Editor of MIX Magazine and is currently mixing monitors on a DiGiCo SD10 for Grammy awarded artists, the Zac Brown Band.

“Our goal with the new Master Series is to take people wherever they need to go,” explains Shelton, “whether they’re already owners of our consoles or just thinking about investing in one. These hands-on training opportunities will take the intermediate to advanced production engineer deeper into our systems, provide a tool kit to sharpen their mixing skills, offer helpful tips, tricks and shortcuts for using our consoles and impart information as to what sets DiGiCo apart from the competition.”

“The DiGiCo Master Class brought us together for one major purpose: DiGiCo consoles,” offers Lindeman. “The workshop gave us an understanding of what is new, what is coming, and the inner workings of these kick-butt consoles. Having each of the console models at our reach was invaluable in being able to understand the differences of each of their personalities—from the frame and up. Not only was it informational, but we also had a great time with lots of laughs and dinner too! Thank you Matt Larson and DiGiCo!”

For upcoming training seminars in your area, sign up for our online newsletter and/or visit our website (www.digico.biz) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/DiGiCo.Official) pages. DiGiCo also offers an extensive catalog of training resources available online at www.digico.tv.

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