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API IN BRAZIL – VISOM DIGITAL AUTHORIZED AS 1608 DEALER

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – AUGUST 2013: Brazil’s Visom Digital has become the latest of authorized API 1608 dealers. Joining the ranks of other API distributors in South America, Visom began carrying the API product line back in 2012. “After their obvious success with API module products, it was logical that Visom now take on representation of the 1608,” said Gordon Smart, API’s managing director.

Located in Rio de Janeiro, Visom Digital is a working studio, audio technology development center, and audio equipment dealer specializing in high-quality, high-profile sound recording. “We only sell what we use and this makes all the difference in credibility for our people,” said owner, Carlos de Andrade.

With a wide range of clients, Visom Digital caters to everything from independent and major recording studios to TV and radio stations. “As an engineer I have always used API, as a salesman I believe in the product, and as a businessman it’s just a good seller,” said de Andrade of the API product line. Visom stands behind the products they represent, while aiming to understand the needs of their customers and partners in order to offer appropriate solutions. They also offer after-sales services, such as warranty, installation and training.

“For most distributors a line like API is a gem to be catered to with great consideration of its tradition,” said de Andrade. “For Visom, API is not a brand. It is a passion and a bit of our history. We will not just sell API. We will evangelize and educate our clients on the ownership of an important part of professional audio.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

METRIC HALO ANNOUNCES IMMEDIATE AVAILABILITY OF MIO CONSOLE 5.6

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – AUGUST 2013: Metric Halo announces the immediate availability of MIO Console v.5.6, a free software upgrade for all users of the Mobile I/O family of audio interfaces, including the award-winning 2882, ULN-2, LIO-8 and ULN-8. Version5.6 includes the following new features: I/O inserts for accessing external hardware from within the MIO Mixer, ConsoleSync hardware/software synchronization technology, AAX ConsoleConnect plug-in for compatibility with Pro Tools 11, saving of system boot states and support for EuCon 3.0. In addition to these new features, v.5.6 continues to improve stability and compatibility with current and future versions of Mac OS X.

ConsoleSync is a unique enhancement to the Mobile I/O family that benefits both new and experienced users. ConsoleSync allows MIO Console to read the complete state of any attached hardware seamlessly, automatically and without any disruption of running audio. ConsoleSync auto loads the mixer configuration, complex signal processing chains, Monitor Controller settings, analog I/O configuration and even window layout from the hardware.

With ConsoleSync, new users will experience a dramatically reduced learning curve for accessing the power of MIO Console. Experienced users will value the ability to have MIO Console re-connect to the hardware with exact recall of the current hardware state and no disruption of audio. For live sound and monitoring applications this allows the user to disconnect and re-connect the computer or quit and launch MIO Console without being concerned about introducing dropouts to ongoing primary and backup recordings or to the monitoring paths for talent.

I/O inserts streamline the use of external analog and digital processors within the MIO mixer. This new feature also allows inserting processors that are hosted on the computer directly within the signal flow of the MIO low-latency hardware mixer. This enables the use of host-based reverbs and delays with greatly simplified routing.

This free upgrade continues the Metric Halo tradition of adding value to the Mobile I/O platform as well as enhancing the product for new users. A 30-day money-back guarantee backs Metric Halo’s hardware products so you can try them out in your studio with no risk. All products in the Mobile I/O family are discounted during the Metric Halo 2013 Summer Sale, which runs until September 15, 2013.

Free download from http://mhsecure.com/metric_halo/support/downloads.html

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

CHARLESTON SOUND’S 32-CHANNEL API 1608 TURNS OUT THE HITS

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA – AUGUST 2013: Four years ago, Charleston Sound set itself apart with a 32-channel 1608 analog console with API’s P-mix automation and additional custom 500-Series expansion slots. Acclaimed studio designer Wes Lachot ensured that the facility’s sonic signature is technically balanced and subjectively stunning. As examples, the live room and isolation booths employ modern conveniences and construction techniques to generate a classic, inviting feel. At the same time, the control room offers creature comforts and an honest, accurate rendering of the auditory work at hand. But the core of Charleston Sound’s success is the 1608.

“The 1608 has been great,” said Jeff Hodges, chief engineer and owner of Charleston Sound. “We have a ton of API 550A and 550b equalizers, and they sound fantastic. The 1608 is also tremendously practical. Its bus architecture is easy to use and flexible, as is the patching. We have, to my knowledge, the only 1608 with sixteen additional 500-Series expansion slots [beyond the sixteen slots afforded by a stock 32-channel 1608]. We’ve loaded those slots up with API modules and a huge range of third-party processors. And there’s still some room to spare.”

Charleston Sound was also the first studio to have automation installed on its 1608. “We love API’s P-mix automation. We rarely do anything in Pro Tools these days,” said Hodges. “It’s so much more intuitive and inspiring to do the fader moves right there on the analog board. It’s actually fun.”

Recently, Charleston Sound attracted country superstar Darius Rucker, American Idol contender Elise Testone, and R&B singer/songwriter Ashanti to lay down some tracks. Many of these are already topping the charts, such as Ashanti’s “Never Should Have” and Darius Rucker’s “True Believers.”

Apart from the console’s sound and functionality, Hodges has also been impressed with the service he has received from API. “They’re fantastic,” he said. “We can always get API service technicians on the phone and they always take care of us… We feel like we’re part of a family, not just a customer.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX ZONE MIX 761 TURN-KEY DSP MANAGES ROCK STAR MANSION-THEMED RESTAURANT IN PUNTA CANA’S HARD ROCK CAFE

PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Rolling Stone Magazine proclaimed Chef Kerry Simon to be the “Rock ‘n Roll Chef,” a distinction fitting for his latest creation: Simon Mansion and Supper Club. The establishment is part of the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Beyond an artfully composed menu and spirits list, the lure of Simon Mansion and Supper Club is its unique and imaginative layout, which recreates the decadent, eccentric rooms of a rock star’s mansion. Guests can dine in the living room, the bedroom, the bathroom, the library, the studio, the patio, and, of course, the dining room. A/V integration firm Audio Diseño designed and installed a custom, high-SPL sound system for Simon Mansion and Supper Club using the cost-effective, high-fidelity Symetrix Zone Mix 761 fixed architecture, standalone digital signal processor.

Miguel González del Rey led the installation on behalf of Audio Diseño. “The purpose of the sound system at Simon Mansion and Supper Club is two-fold,” he said. “Most of the time it functions as a background music system, with noticeably higher volume than your average restaurant. At other times however, the system may be driven up to 96dB. After all, this is the Hard Rock Hotel, and this restaurant is a rock star’s mansion! Beyond the necessity of high volume and high fidelity, the style required an unobtrusive installation. Therefore, almost all of the loudspeakers and subwoofers are mounted in the ceiling.”

Inputs to the system include background music from a computer and a music streaming device, as well as two in-ceiling microphones for sensing background music. With twelve inputs, six outputs, and comprehensive processing facilities, the Symetrix Zone Mix 761 sits at the heart of the system. Its outputs feed several separate zones, including the kitchen, the dining room, the bedroom, the bathroom, and the smoking room. ElectroVoice CPS 4.5 and PA2250T amplifiers ably power a distributed array of SoundTube CM890d, CM500i, and SM590i loudspeakers and SoundTube CM1001d-T subwoofers. The restaurant staff and management can select input sources and adjust the volume from a Symetrix ARC wall panel remote.

“The Symetrix Zone Mix 761 has the right input/output count and processing facilities for a job like this,” said del Rey. “Its ambient noise-sensing algorithm is usable and natural, as are the dynamic controls that provide amplifier and loudspeaker protection. Most importantly however, the Zone Mix 761 sounds fantastic. Configuring the Symetrix ARC wall panel controllers was also easy and flexible. The client made several requests for user control, and we were easily able to accommodate all of them.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN’S DUDERSTADT MULTIMEDIA CENTER NOW FLUSH WITH API ANALOG CONSOLES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN: The Duderstadt Center on the University of Michigan campus is a unique facility, not only because it is outfitted with three API consoles. In addition to housing libraries for the Art, Architecture, and Engineering programs and various computing facilities, the Duderstadt Center also houses the Digital Media Commons, which now includes three audio creation, recording, and production rooms designed by Walters-Storyk Design Group. Two of the rooms are recent additions and, in conjunction with the original Audio Studio’s 48-channel API Vision console, feature a 32-channel API Vision console and a 16-channel API 1608. As one might expect, the sophisticated, yet easy to navigate, rooms are used for art, music, and recording classes and provide students with first-hand experience in professional facilities. Importantly, any University of Michigan faculty member, staff member, or student can receive training on the use of the Duderstadt Center facilities and then use those facilities for any purpose whatsoever, school-related or not.

“The Duderstadt Center functions more like a lab than it does a classroom or a commercial studio,” explained David Greenspan, managing producer, University of Michigan. “We complement the audio facilities with video production resources, including computer animation workstations, a video capture studio, and editing suites. Users can take their video projects directly into the audio rooms. We were careful to design the whole facility in a way that would effectively flatten the learning curve. We would much rather have our users creating inspired art than worrying about which buttons to push. Because all three audio rooms use API consoles, users can [easily] move between them.”

The smallest of the three rooms is lovingly referred to as EMS A, short for Electronic Music Studio A. It is organized around the API 1608 console, which features slots for any 500-series modular processor. EMS A employs that flexibility to offer users three flavors of compression in dual-channel pairs: two API 525s, two API 527s, and two Pendulum Audio OCL-500s. Monitoring uses a 5.1 combination of Adam full-frequency loudspeakers and Genelec subwoofers. The larger EMS B is organized around the 32-channel API Vision console, which was custom built by API to deliver either 7.1 or 8.0 surround sound via Genelec 1037 loudspeakers and subs. Comprehensive networking between EMS A, EMS B, and the original Audio Studio’s 48-channel Vision allow sharing of resources – and even synchrony for large and involved productions.

When deciding what consoles to install in the new rooms, many factors came into play. “First, I wanted to protect the University of Michigan’s investment,” said Greenspan. “Signal flow is signal flow, whether you’re working with an analog console or a digital console. But digital protocols change, and I couldn’t promise the provost that a digital console we installed today would still be relevant twenty years from now. With an analog heart, we can be flexible and stay current with the evolving digital technologies that surround it.”

Given the Duderstadt Center’s positive experience with the original API Vision console, Greenspan was inclined to fill the new rooms with API consoles as well. “When they go out of warranty, it will be less expensive to maintain a single manufacturer than it would be to maintain multiple manufacturers,” he said. “But it also makes the training less onerous and the transition from room to room much easier. That sounded like the most inspiring approach to take.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

AUSTRALIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY VETERAN PHIL RIGGER CHOOSES METRIC HALO HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: Phil Rigger got his start in the music business the old fashioned way – in a rock band. That was the early 1980s, and the band was Outline. With Rigger on trumpet (boosted by a board loaded with pedals that launched his horn to the stratosphere) and acing the role of front man and lead vocalist, Outline tore up Australia, headlining packed shows and opening up for international acts that stopped down under. It was only a few years after the band split that Rigger formed Monstereo Music, a music and video production company that Rigger heads to this day. Now several decades into a financially successful and stable career, Rigger has written hit songs for other Aussie artists, produced and engineered innumerable albums, composed and produced for television and film, and, above all, continued to let his enthusiasm for the creative life keep him on a path that’s true. Along the way, he found Metric Halo and is now a dedicated user of Metric Halo’s hardware interfaces, its sound analysis program SpectraFoo, and its flagship plug-in ChannelStrip.

In addition to the intangible aspects of music production, Monstereo Music possesses a full-fledged recording studio and video production suite in Sydney. Like most people who get in the business and stay in the business, Rigger is opinionated about sound and the gear that improves (or sullies) it. The studio starts with a collection of tube mics from BeezNeez, Groove Tube, Neumann, and Rode, as well as solid-state microphones from those manufacturers and Shure, AKG, and Sennheiser. Outboard gear includes dual-channel Peach Audio tube preamps, Groove Tube SuPRE preamps, a Groove Tube MP-1 preamp, and a six-channel Audio Developments Class A mixer. The main Mac runs Cubase 7 and possesses 32GB RAM, 20TB of storage, and a Blackmagic video input card and 3GB output card. Event Electronics Opal studio monitors provide transduction at the other end. The video production suite possesses a cyclorama, three cameras, monitoring, and video switching. The video room and the control room are connected optically and via analogue so that users can monitor video input/output, as well as multichannel audio for webcasting and in-house shoots.

A collection of Metric Halo interfaces handles input and output conversion, as well as preamplification when Rigger is using a tube mic (he doesn’t necessarily like to go tube mic to tube pre for vocals). The collection includes one ULN-8, one 2882, and two ULN-2s, (one in the recording studio and one in the video production suite). “I got my first Metric Halo 2882 over a decade ago when my friend and frequent collaborator David Quinn discovered it,” said Rigger. “Because Metric Halo so faithfully supports its products with hardware and software upgrades, I’m still using that same 2882 today! What other piece of computer-related equipment evades obsolescence for so long? Between David and I we have three ULN8s, three 2882s and three ULN2s all with 2D cards.

He continued, “The reason I like Metric Halo interfaces is because they have that solid, high-quality sound. I’ve worked on a bunch of different high-end consoles over the years, and Metric Halo easily has the sound quality to compete with any of them. Of course, the portability is also fabulous. I’ve recorded so many live sets with my Metric Halo interfaces. They’re always solid and reliable.” Rigger also cites the on-board DSP as useful, especially the Character emulations that give the preamps different colors. “I’m a fan of the Classic British Pre emulation,” he said. “It adds a nice warmth to the recording that isn’t overbearing. In combination with a nice tube mic on vocals, the Metric Halo preamps produce a beautiful, rich recording.”

But Rigger’s use of Metric Halo gear doesn’t end there. In the studio, he keeps a second Mac up that runs SpectraFoo. It’s digitally connected to the main system for mixing and mastering. “SpectraFoo works beautifully,” Rigger said. “I’ve had it for nearly a decade. Other sound analysis programs have come along, but SpectraFoo’s display is par excellence. Having it up on a second computer works really well for me because the machine has nothing else to do but analyze the input. The great thing about that setup is that while I’m working, I can solo any individual track, any group, or even the entire song and analyze it.”

Finally, Rigger uses ChannelStrip as his go-to equalization and compression plug-in. “If I want to surgically adjust something, de-ess a vocal or brighten an acoustic track, ChannelStrip is fantastic,” he said. “It doesn’t put much of a load on the system, and although that isn’t such a huge concern these days, it’s a testament to good software design. I have a large collection of plug-ins, most of which I acquired for a particular sound or function, but ChannelStrip is more neutral and allows fine adjustment without imposing itself on the sound – a great feature! Metric Halo equipment and software are the foundation for my business.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY INSTALLS 64-CHANNEL API VISION CONSOLE FOR RECORDING ARTS ACADEMIC PROGRAM

WINTER PARK, FLORIDA: Full Sail University’s Studio B is now the official home of a 64-channel API Vision console. The console will be the centerpiece of the university’s Recording Arts Academic Program. After a rigorous process, Full Sail’s new Vision eventually became the console of choice, primarily due to its distinct analog sound and highly teachable signal path. Installed on January 2nd, Full Sail has completely integrated the console into its Academic Program and is more than pleased with this next level of professional gear offered to students.

“We are excited to have the API Vision Console installed into one of our on-campus studios,” said Darren Schneider, advanced session recording course director at Full Sail University. “This addition to campus provides another opportunity to work on a professional platform and prepares them with knowledge of the technology they will encounter when pursuing careers in the music industry.”

Founded more than thirty years ago, Full Sail University, according to Rolling Stone Magazine, offers one of the top five best music programs in the country and is home to over 18,000 students from all over the world. “We’re honored to have an API console at such a prestigious educational facility,” API President Larry Droppa commented. “Students enrolled in the Recording Arts program learn all aspects of console technique and we’re convinced API products are an excellent way to both teach and understand signal path and signal flow.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

1608 IN KOREA – API NAMES MI CORP A 1608 DISTRIBUTOR

SEOUL, KOREA: When MI Corp signed on as a distributor earlier this year, it was clear that they would make a great API representative in Korea. Now, taking the next step, MI Corp has become Korea’s representative, making the coveted console available to an entire market that was previously untapped.

MI Corp experienced much initial success with API products such as the Lunchbox®, 500 Series modules and the 3124+. As they began to design recording studios, it was clear that one thing was missing: the API 1608 console.

“MI Corp is designing prominent recording studios and meeting the most difficult demands of sound engineers,” said Sunny Park, Manager of the Import Department. “Many engineers [in Korea] would like to own and operate an API 1608 console.” And thus, the authorization to sell the 1608 console began. The 1608 that was shipped just a few weeks ago features its own demo room at the MI Corp headquarters.

Situated in the Gangnam-Gu area of Seoul, MI Corp originated as a musical instrument distributor back in 1997. As of 2009, they began to expand their services, aiming to become a leader in the multi-media industry. Expanding to professional audio and video, as well as the architecture and design of studios, they have been known as MI Corp ever since. Sales director and former recording engineer, Ted Suh, was familiar with the API reputation and knew the impact it would have in Korea and API soon became a fundamental part of their inventory.

“In the current digital audio equipment market, customers missed analog music equipment. We think API is the leading company, not only for consoles, but analog modules,” said Park.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

RASCAL FLATTS FOH ENGINEER JONATHAN LOESER RELIES ON METRIC HALO SPECTRAFOO SOUND ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA: In only a dozen years, Jonathan Loeser has risen from newly-minted SAE Institute graduate to FOH engineer for multi-platinum country act Rascal Flatts. Along the way, he has worked as FOH engineer & production manager for Olivia Newton-John, FOH & monitor engineer for Prince’s “Welcome 2 America” tour, and FOH Engineer for Colbie Caillat’s 2011 Tour. The amiable engineer secured those gigs by delivering consistently excellent results, largely free of hiccups or hassles, through careful planning. One of his go-to tricks is careful metering and sound analysis. On the recommendation of colleagues, he recently upgraded to Metric Halo’s sound analysis software, SpectraFoo, which is paired with his Metric Halo LIO-8 interface, itself recently upgraded to include preamps.

“I originally purchased the LIO-8 to give myself a serious, professional interface that would be flexible enough to do anything I needed it to do,” said Loeser. “Prior to that, my converter was cheap. It felt like it was going to break in my hand. The LIO-8, together with its companion MIO Console software, gives me all of the routing and flexibility I need.” Although he had previously used a wireless DBX measurement microphone with line-level output, for the new Rascal Flatts tour, Loeser wanted to expand his monitoring options. “I added the mic preamp option for the LIO-8, which now gives me even more flexibility and portability.”

Previously, Loeser had used sound analysis software primarily for its transfer function. “With SpectraFoo, I’m still able to do that, of course, but I’m also able to do so much more,” he said. “SpectraFoo is very flexible. For example, when I do a time capture, I can move the point that I want to correlate with, which makes it a much more useful tool. Once I learned how to compose and save snapshot window sets, I configured SpectraFoo to show me everything I want to see for tuning and, separately, for the actual show.” Part of that functionality includes making up for his Studer Vista 5’s seeming only weakness: metering.

Tuning the system requires dealing with Rascal Flatts’ somewhat unconventional stage setup. “We have an extensive thrust, and there’s an apron in front of the stage that makes it hard to fill the gaps that it creates,” Loeser explained. “I have some under-hangs that do the trick, but they are touchy. For this tour, I’ve added two Audix measurement mics. During system tuning, I’m able to place them in the questionable zone of seating. Then, using SpectraFoo, I can actually see what the down-fills are doing. That’s critical because squeezing good vocal volume out when the main vocal mic is in front of the PA is my biggest potential headache.”

During tuning, Loeser’s custom SpectraFoo screen includes full-frequency transfer functions on the wireless RTA mic, as well as on the thrust mics. He also includes high-resolution, low-frequency transfer functions to properly align the subwoofers. For the show itself, Loeser flips to another custom SpectraFoo screen. He moves the Audix microphones to a near-audience position on stage that is also used by the monitor engineer for crowd capture. In addition to watching the transfer functions for those microphones, Loeser also takes a feed from the Vista 5 that parallels his send to the PA and gives it a big, fat meter in SpectraFoo.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

DIVERSITY FIN ANTENNA ON TOUR WITH BRYAN ADAMS

VANCOUVER, CANADA – JULY 2013: Veteran monitor mixer and founder of Vancouver-based audio company Gearforce, Robert Nevalainen ensures the many channels of wireless audio systems used on Bryan Adams’ international tours function flawlessly. After reading an article on polarization diversity for wireless microphone antennas, Nevalainen decided to evaluate the Diversity Fin cross-polarized antenna, from RF Venue, against other directional antennas while on a six-city tour through Australia. “We did an A to B type test comparing the Diversity Fin against our stock Shure and Sennheiser systems, and were quite impressed,” Nevalainen remembers.

“Gearforce supplies Bryan Adams with our universal tour kit which now includes RF Venue’s Diversity Fin,” says Nevalainen. “The kit also includes seven wireless channels using Shure UHRF receivers and UA845 amplifiers. Both Adams and lead guitarist Keith Scott use UR-1 body-pack transmitters with U845 combiners. For personal wireless monitoring they use Shure PSM1000s with a PA821A combiner.”

“I carry this exact same equipment around the world with me. So, when we change out a piece, its quite easy to see how well it works, because everything is known,” Nevalainen states. “In addition to its reliability and predictability, the Diversity Fin worked well because of its compact footprint in our congested left stage area. We were also quite pleased with the reduction in switching noise. The antenna basically forces the diversity receiver to choose between signals less frequently, and as a result you get more silent switching.”

Nevalainen has just returned from a series of June stadium shows in Denmark. “We have now been using the Diversity Fin exclusively with Bryan’s guitar setup,” he reports. “It has really simplified our setup and given us very reliable and predictable directional antenna coverage.”

ABOUT RF VENUE RF Venue manufactures wireless audio equipment including remote antennas, RF distribution equipment, and cable assemblies. The company’s primary antenna products include the interference mitigating RF Spotlight, the lightweight foldable helical antenna CP Beam, and the polarization diversity antenna dubbed Diversity Fin. For more information visit: www.RFvenue.com

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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