A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive of the NAMM Newslink Category

JD PRODUCTIONS TO INSTALL 32-CHANNEL API LEGACY PLUS IN NORTH CAROLINA STUDIO

SANFORD, NORTH CAROLINA – APRIL 2013: A new API Legacy Plus Console with Vision automation will find a home at JD Productions in Sanford, North Carolina later this year. The 32-channel console is being built by API with many custom features for the Raleigh-area space. The recording studio’s design is being overseen by the legendary Wes Lachot of Wes Lachot Design for well-known producer John Davenport.

John Davenport grew up in Sanford, where his passion for music soon took him to New York, where he learned the recording business from the ground up. When he began in the late 70s at Secret Sound Studio, he learned the craft from some of the best engineers and producers of the times.

John spent the 80s as a recording engineer at the iconic Hit Factory in New York where he worked with a variety of impressive acts such as the Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, John & Yoko, Cindy Lauper, Judy Collins, and Little Steven. He received Platinum Album awards from the United Nations for Little Steven’s Sun City, where he was chief engineer. Now returning to his hometown, it seems John has come full circle, in more ways than one.

Aside from returning to his old stomping grounds, it appears as though John will also be returning to his analog roots. Being a former staff engineer at the Hit factory, John was trained on analog consoles exclusively. After a period in digital, he will connect with his analog past using the API Legacy Plus.

“The smile on my face is because, after three decades of working at professional and makeshift studios, I finally have the opportunity of building my own dream studio,” he says. “It didn’t take long to select my choice of console. API, the sound and workmanship, is like no other. Thank you, Dan Zimbelman (of API), Wes Lachot Design, and the craftsmen at API making my dream possible.”

John’s recording studio is located along the Deep River in North Carolina where he continues to develop artists and produce films. His skills as an engineer, producer, and artist developer have led him to the title of Co-Founder and Vice President of Music of JD Productions.

The studio will be built from the ground up as a 1,300 square foot space designed by Wes Lachot of Wes Lachot Design. “I can say that I recommend API consoles to my clients because they represent the very best in analog design and sound quality and always make the room sound the best,” said Lachot. “Very best sounding rooms are nothing without the best sounding gear.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

Sure Shot Adds DiGiCo’s SD10B Console To Its Newest Mobile Broadcast Truck

Sure Shot Transmissions is a mobile production and satellite services outfit with offices located in New York, Dallas, and Youngstown, Ohio. Last fall, owner Dennis Kunce added a fourth 40′ full-service expandable truck to its offerings. The Cynthia Lee, outfitted with DiGiCo’s SD10B console, will handle sporting and entertainment events under the direction of EIC Kory Loy. Kunce picked the SD10B based on a recommendation from one of the audio principals at ESPN, as the console has been a mainstay in X Games’ submix trucks for the past several years at events around the globe.

Since hitting the road back in September, the Cynthia Lee has made its debut handling install feeds at a host of high-profile events including the 39th Ryder Cup for the UK’s Sky Sports News, the 2012 Allstate BCS National Championship and the Daytona 500 for ESPN in the U.S., as well as the 2013 Super Bowl for Nippon TV in Japan. The console’s ability to interface with the other trucks via MADI and fiber networks, as well as its easy learning curve, made it a natural fit for these fast-paced events.

“Our intention when we built the truck was to meet ESPN’s need for a mid-level production truck; one that was more like a 6-8 camera production rather than the typical 10-15 one,” explains Sure Shot owner, Dennis Kunce. “We worked closely with ESPN to determine what audio board would be suitable for them in this specific application and DiGiCo is what they recommended and gave us their blessing. The people at DiGiCo worked with us to meet our price point to stay within the budget. But more importantly, the SD10B’s footprint, versatility, and power—all those things came into play in our decision. DiGiCo was also very supportive with their training; they came to our facility in Ohio and worked with Kory and our chief engineer Scott Tucker to show us the things needed to make the board workable out in the field. You’ve got to have a console that is very user-friendly or else you’re in trouble and the DiGiCo console offers us the kind of flexibility and versatility we have to have as an independent contractor working with all the major networks including NBC, Fox, Turner, ESPN, Sky Sports… right down the line. The exposure we’re getting by having the board in our truck has been very positive. Overall, it has been a very positive experience across the board.”

“As the engineer in charge of the mobile unit,” explains Loy, “I’m tasked with ensuring that all the pieces of equipment in the truck are up and running for the freelance crew to operate—everything from the audio console to the video switchers to the cameras. So, even though I’m not one of the hands-on operators at these events, I do have to train, or at least show the different operators how to use the console, with only a couple days training. A lot of our events are setup, shoot and strike and in a single, 10-hour day and I’ve got to give individuals that have never operated the console before a generic overview in 45 minutes to an hour time before I have to move on to doing other functions in the truck. And I believe I’m able to do that rather well because the console is very easy to use.”

This spring, Sure Shot will be covering a host of major league baseball and basketball events for the major networks and ESPN, as well events as for the NHK channel in Japan. “We will be handling a lot of split feeds for them, the same thing as we did for the Super Bowl,” Loy says. “Nippon TV operator Shuhei Anraku took generic feeds from the NFL, supplemented by several of their own cameras, to create and produce their own game with their own announcers, which was fed to the broadcast headquarters in Japan.”

Loy says the fact that everything can connect via fiber is a huge bonus for them. “Another benefit is that the console is scalable, you can literally have as many inputs/outputs as you want. So, if we ever find a need for more ins or outs, we can add a few and connect them via fiber. Having MADI available in and out (the SD10 has 2 MADI ins and 2 MADI outs), also makes it very flexible to integrate either into a router or an intercom system. Another added benefit of DiGiCo is being able to assign any input to any fader on the console.”

For Janice Stief, a 30-year audio veteran who has worked on sporting and entertainment events ranging from the Olympics to the most recent Ryder Cup in the Sure Shot truck, this was her first outing on a DiGiCo of any variety. “I was handling cut-ins for the Sky Sports news show back in London. I had about 8-10 mics set up around the course, from stick and RF mics to in-studio lavalieres. I was handling EVS inputs into my console for playbacks, as well as program feeds from NBC and the world feed, which added up to about 36-40 inputs on the console in addition to mikes I was controlling. Prior to getting started, I was given a quick tutorial from Kory, who was fantastic and very knowledgeable. There’s a lot to the console that clearly you have got learn over time; you can’t learn it all on one show. It has a lot of depth. I liked that once I would attention a fader, I could do most of my adjustments to that fader input right from the corresponding touchscreen strip, without moving to other areas of the console. Adding delay, which we often need to do on golf in order to sync up on-air talent to RF cameras, is quick and easy.”

“I think the neatest feature of the DiGiCo SD10B is the ability to have MADI interfacing to the trucks and Optocore to the SD Racks,” adds Shawn Peacock, who was the main console operator for the Daytona 500 and has worked with DiGiCo consoles on several X Games events in Los Angeles. “The ability for us to talk across MADI in these situations is huge.”

Ultimately, however, the measure of a good manufacturer goes beyond that of its gear, and Loy says DiGiCo’s customer support is stellar. “When every single thing in the truck is a computer, chances are stuff is going to fail. It’s how a manufacturer supports its products after the gear is sold and installed that gives a good or bad impression. DiGiCo’s training and customer service in that area is exceptional.”

SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER STUDIO CONTINUES TO ROLL OUT THE PROJECTS WITH ITS API 1608

JESSUP, MARYLAND – MARCH 2013: The original plan was simply to upgrade Sammy Hagar’s project studio – Red Rocker – so that he and his super group Chickenfoot could deliver decent-sounding demos, but in consultation with his engineer, John Cuniberti (Stevie Wonder, Dead Kennedys, Joe Satriani), Hagar ended up purchasing a 16-channel API 1608 analog console. They recorded Chickenfoot’s first demo on the 1608 several years ago, and, owing to the magic of a few takes and the sonic integrity imparted by the 1608, several of those demo recordings made it to the album. Inspired by what they could accomplish at Red Rocker, they did the entire recording for the ironically-named follow-up album, Chickenfoot III on the 1608. Currently, Hagar is tracking on the 1608 for an as-yet unnamed solo project.

“We’re an old school bunch, it’s true, and we wanted the feel and sound of an analog console for Red Rocker,” said Cuniberti. “We weren’t going to go so far as to roll in a two-inch tape machine – we’re not that old school! We appreciate the virtues of digital recording and editing when it’s handled properly. But a nice analog console would tie things together with a workflow and a sound that we were all comfortable with.”

Cuniberti has spent over three decades behind vintage consoles of all stripes. “They have their charms, of course, but they’re also a pain in the ass,” he said. “You really need full-time maintenance. I didn’t want to burden Sammy or myself with that level of investment. We wanted something new, and I was therefore happy that API released the 1608. API is one of my favorite console manufacturers of all time, but I don’t think we could have justified the jump to one of their large-format consoles. It turns out that the 1608 was an excellent choice. In four years, we’ve never had a single issue with it – not even a burned out light! Having spent so many years dealing with unreliable vintage consoles, it’s nice to know that when I show up to the studio, everything will be working.”

Cuniberti finds the sound of the API 1608 meets the high expectations he had from his previous work on other large API consoles. “It’s classic API,” he said. “It has clarity and punch, and it’s very pleasant sounding. I don’t want to say it’s transparent; I just want to say that it has a great sound. It passes signal like nothing I’ve ever heard. It has tons of headroom. You can abuse it and it still sounds great.”

The 1608’s architecture allows Cuniberti to maximize his productivity with just sixteen channels. “API worked hard to optimize the flexibility of the 1608’s signal path,” he said. Its modular design allows one to swap 500-series processors to suit the needs of a project, and Cuniberti replaced the four stock API 560 graphic EQs with four API 550b four-band sweepable EQs. Because it’s been such a pleasure to work on, Hagar and Cuniberti are currently contemplating adding a 16-channel expansion unit for their 1608 to bring Red Rocker up to 32 channels.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

PACIFIC TELEVISION CENTER UNPLUGS AND GOES WIRELESS FOR THE 2013 AWARDS SEASON

LOS ANGELES, MARCH 21, 2013 – Pacific Television Center (PacTV), a Los Angeles-based independent global transmission and production company, recently equipped its mobile microwave truck with a Vislink wireless camera system, providing its clients with instantaneous live video from the various red carpets during the 2013 awards season. The Canadian Broadcasting Channel (CBC) and Channel 7 Australia were among the broadcasters that used the PacTV service to transmit live red-carpet interviews during the major U.S. film awards that took place in Los Angeles last month.
“What’s nice about using the Vislink wireless camera system with our ENG truck is that it increases our geographical coverage and allows us to perform a single encode throughout our network,” says George Lopez, vice president of operations, PacTV. “Even if a client covering the red carpet action doesn’t have cabling access to our truck, the new camera system allows them to shoot wirelessly and send an ASI feed to Canada, Australia, the Asia-Pacific region or anywhere else. We are excited to offer our clients this upgrade in service.”
The dual band Vislink L1500 is a 5.8-/6.4-Ghz wireless camera system that provides SD/HD with MPEG-2 encoding and offers ultra-low latency with selectable DVB-T and LMS-T digital modulation. PacTV has successfully tested and used the transmitter to reach distances, more than a quarter mile without a drop in signal. A crew can certainly be confident that they will achieve a wireless connection to PacTV’s mobile microwave truck.
“We were thrilled to have PacTV utilize the Vislink system for its awards season coverage,” says Kevin Dennis, regional sales manager, Vislink. “The combination of the diversity receive system and untethered wireless camera operation provided the team with the reliability it needed to capture live events as they unfolded, without interference. By combining the technical strengths of PacTV and Vislink, both companies have been able to come together to offer quality services to clients.”

METRIC HALO USER & DEALER AUDIOGUY EARNS SEVEN KOREAN MUSIC AWARDS NOMINATIONS AND ONE WIN!

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA – MARCH 2013: South Korea’s Audioguy & Partners is an aptly named clearinghouse for all things related to great audio. Headed by the passionate (and terrifically busy!) Jung-Hoon Choi, Audioguy is a world-class recording studio, an audiophile record label for jazz, classical, and world music, and a dealer for high-end pro audio equipment. Choi proudly wears many hats at Audioguy, including CEO, producer, recording/mixing/mastering engineer, and sales manager. His hard work was recently rewarded by winning the 2013 Korean Music Award for “Best Jazz & Crossover – Performance Album” along with six other nominations in the Jazz and Crossover category. Consistent with a tireless pursuit of transparent sound, Audioguy is both a Metric Halo user and a Metric Halo dealer. Indeed, all seven of the KMA-nominated and winning works were recorded and mixed using Metric Halo ULN-8 and ULN-2 preamp/conversion interfaces.

Audioguy & Partners recently opened a state-of-the-art recording facility. Notably, it includes a Hamburg Steinway & Sons D piano, an SSL console, over seventy microphones (many vintage), and multiple Metric Halo interfaces. Although new to the scene, between 30% and 40% of South Korea’s jazz recordings already happen at Audioguy. “I always strive to make recordings that are timeless,” explained Choi. “I don’t want to be part of a trend. I want my recordings to be as engaging decades from now as they are today.” In addition to studio work, Audioguy provides location recording services throughout South Korea, as well as China, Japan, and even Europe. The portability and audiophile quality of the Metric Halo interfaces make them reliable travel companions.

“All of the Metric Halo hardware is great, but I especially love the ULN-8,” said Choi. “The ULN-8’s microphone preamplifiers are outstanding, and the conversion is pristine. I also love Metric Halo MIO Console, the software that controls the routing and DSP of all connected Metric Halo interfaces. It can do anything! Whatever a producer, engineer, or musician can dream up, MIO Console can do.”

Audioguy & Partners is also a record label that releases some of the most innovative and captivating classical, jazz, and world music of South Korea. “Our identity is strong because we handle all of our own planning, producing, recording, mixing, mastering, and promotion,” said Choi. “Metric Halo is a part of most of those stages, and all of our Korean Music Awards nominations and winning work were recorded, mixed, and mastered using the ULN-8 and ULN-2.” Those nominations include three for “Best Jazz & Crossover – Jazz” (Sorefa, Soar, and Ascetic) and four for “Best Jazz & Crossover – Performance Album” (Sorefa, Reverberation, Discover Myself, and Ascetic). To their excitement, Sorefa turned into a win for “Best Jazz & Crossover – Performance Album” during the evening’s awards ceremony.

Everything else that’s happening at Audioguy sets it apart as a pro audio equipment dealer. “All of our staff are recording engineers,” said Choi. “They understand the real-world performance of our products, and they accordingly offer our customers proper suggestions and service. They know more than the manual or the sales pitch; they know how our products operate in the field. Working with the people at Metric Halo is great. They are timely, competent, and always very friendly.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

MONTREAL’S ANALOG RECORDING SCENE DEFINED BY STUDIO 270’S API LEGACY PLUS

MONTRÉAL, CANADA – MARCH 2013: Studio 270 has proven that the purest sound cannot be digitized with their 48-channel API Legacy Plus with API Vision automation. Nearly two years ago, François Hamel and Robert Langois decided to reconnect with recording’s analog roots by purchasing the Legacy Plus for their Montréal-based studio. They were the first to acquire an API Legacy Plus with API Vision automation, an investment that Hamel claims was the best they have ever made.

When Studio 270 set up shop in 1987, the digital tsunami had yet to make landfall. Now, twenty-six years later, it is thriving in a world where most of its clients regard inexpensive and omnipresent digital technology as an extension of their organic being. It is for precisely that reason that the studio decided to distinguish itself by committing to time-tested, analog technology. That decision has paid off in dividends as area musicians discover that the API sound far exceeds the limited capabilities of their digital gadgetry.

“We predicted that ‘mid-level’ recording studios would have a hard time surviving as more and more inexpensive digital technology became available, and we were right.” Hamel said of Studio 270. “But in addition, young musicians have no basis for understanding the difference between a $125 interface and a $125,000 digital console. To them, digital is digital, and if they can buy a digital product that promises them the moon for $600, then in their eyes, why should they book a digital studio for $600 a day?”

Hamel likened his younger clientele’s experience to that of fine dining. “The API Legacy Plus is like a five-star restaurant,” he said. “An inexpensive digital rig is like a microwave. You have a microwave at home, and you eat at home most of the time. But on special occasions, it’s good to get out and go to a five-star restaurant, where maybe you don’t exactly understand how the cook pulls it off, but the difference is obvious.”

“They’ve never seen moving faders before,” he said of the younger clientele. “It’s a revelation to them that they can – and should – mix with their eyes closed. They’re used to staring at screens. Apart from its immense functionality and stability (the software never crashes), API automation is worth it strictly from a marketing perspective.”

When his clients hear the API Legacy Plus, they’re often taken aback. Since Studio 270 installed it, many bands have booked a few days without making future plans to return. They have a remarkable experience, and then they’re back a few months later. “They want to relive the experience!” said Hamel. “It’s API’s headroom and separation. When you mix on an iPad or whatever, everything is smashed in. Once they hear the openness and liveliness of the Legacy Plus, they’re hooked. They’ll work jobs on the weekends to get back in here.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

Guruz Media Drums Up Attention for Sabian Cymbals at Winter NAMM with PixelFLEX LED Video Curtain Wall

At Winter NAMM, the musical instrument industry’s signature trade show, standing out from the crowd is always a challenge. To get the attention of attendees, exhibitors rely on companies such as Guruz Media, a leading full-service marketing agency, to attract prospective customers to their booths.

Working on behalf of exhibitor Sabian Cymbals, Guruz Media developed an innovative and eye-catching 16′ tall by 8′ diameter tower of cymbals stretching from the ground to high above the trade show floor. To ensure the tower of cymbals would capture the attention of visitors no matter where they were, Guruz added a PixelFLEX LED video curtain wall as a backdrop.

Exceptionally light weight and extremely flexible, the PixelFLEX curtain was the perfect solution for creating a column of bold-colored LED lighting inside the interior of the cymbal tower that was sure to turn heads. According to Doug Webber, chief creative officer for Guruz, mission accomplished.

“Anybody can go to a trade show and rent big screens for their booth, but when it comes down to it, there has to be something that pushes it over the top to really get people to notice,” Webber said. “Whether that is something of the unexpected, or just maybe huge, like the cymbal tower. As soon as I saw the PixelFLEX screens online and how they could bend around nearly any shape or structure, I knew how I could use them at Winter NAMM to make a difference for my client at the show.”

For the cymbal tower backdrop at Winter NAMM, Guruz used 12 panels of PixelFLEX’s 20mm LED video curtain. Featuring 2500 pixels PSM (Per Square Meter) and 3240 nit brightness, PixelFLEX’s curtain provided Webber and his team a solution that was easy to set up and operate – benefits to trade show support that cannot be understated.

“We were trying to create an architectural design element that had some movement, visually speaking, going on inside the tower,” Webber said. “We found a nice piece of digital juice eye candy, colorized it to match the rest of the branding in the booth, and just allowed it to loop over and over again on the PixelFLEX screens.

With more than 200 cymbals on the tower, it was a perfect solution for filling the negative space between the cymbals,” Webber continued. “On top of that, it was super simple to install and operate. The client [Sabian] was extremely happy and competitors definitely took note. One even mentioned to us that it was the best cymbal display they had ever seen at Winter NAMM. ”

Flexible in all directions and exceptionally durable, PixelFLEX LED Curtains are able to bend and shape around structures for a more creative display effect. For more information on PixelFLEX and its growing line of lightweight LED video screens, visit www.LEDCurtain.com. Follow PixelFLEX at www.Facebook.com/PixelFLEXUSA and @LEDCurtain.

DPA Brings d:facto™ II Vocal Mic to Frankfurt Prolight + Sound 2013

With the launch of the new d:facto II Vocal Microphone, which will be on show for the first time in Europe at Prolight + Sound 2013 (Booth 8.B60), DPA Microphones has now broadened its range of products for the live stage by introducing a high quality vocal microphone that gives users unlimited possibilities for their performance.

This eagerly awaited addition to the DPA condenser microphone range brings true studio sound to the live stage by offering an extraordinarily natural sound, superior gain before feedback and extreme SPL handling. In addition to use with the new wired DPA handle, the d:facto II provides singers and engineers with the added benefit of a state-of-the-art adapter system that allows for seamless integration with many professional wireless systems.

“The launch of the d:facto II Vocal Microphone is a major step for DPA as it means that we now have a microphone for every acoustic miking situation, whether you are amplifying or recording,” says DPA’s CEO Christian Poulsen. “Our highly regarded Reference Standard microphones have long delivered superb audio quality to musicians who want to use a microphone on a stand, while our innovative d:vote™ 4099 Instrument Microphones and our range of miniature microphones are ideal for those who prefer to have their microphone mounted on their instrument. With d:facto II we can now offer the same renowned DPA sound to vocalists who can choose the wired d:facto II or the wireless d:facto II if they prefer the freedom of movement that a wireless microphone delivers. And, of course, for an even more mobile solution we have the lightweight, easy to wear d:fine™ headset microphones that are so popular with theatre and musical productions and is demanded for more and more live concerts where the singers require superior sound while dancing and performing.”

The new d:facto II guarantees users exceptional DPA sound with popular existing wireless systems such as Sony, Lectrosonics, Shure, Wisycom and Sennheiser. To achieve such a high level of audio quality, DPA had tothink differently.

“These systems deliver very limited power to drive our high-end microphone capsule, so we had to be creative and put a huge amount of work and thought into the electronic circuit of the adapter solution,” Christian Poulsen adds. “We are extremely proud to have developed an ingenious adapter range that brings the acclaimed DPA sound out of a wireless system. We wanted to be completely true to the input of the vocalist, and with d:facto II we have reached this goal.”

Equally at home in sound reinforcement and recording applications, the d:facto II is the vocal microphone that the music industry has been waiting for. Its simple plug-and-play features allow it to reproduce an extraordinary natural sound, which reaches the extreme sound level handling of 160 dB. As with all DPA mics, the d:facto II is superbly linear in frequency and phase, both on- and off-axis, while its impressive definition and accuracy reproduces a singer’s voice effortlessly. It also sets new standards its robust three-stage pop protection grid that ensures the removal of unwanted noise.

At Prosound + Light 2013, folk pop band SHEL will be performing on the DPA booth using the new d:facto II vocal microphones in several wireless configurations. Already fans of DPA’s d:vote 4099 Instrument Mics which they use on their violin and djembe drums, SHEL recently took the d:facto II Vocal Microphone on the road for concerts in Denver, Salt Lake City and Los Angeles where they performed at the NAMM show.

Alongside the new d:facto II, DPA will also be showing new solutions for its Reference Standard range of microphones, including a new and unobtrusive gooseneck cable that is available in several lengths. Furthermore, DPA will show the supercardioid d:vote 4099 instrument microphone mounted in an elegant gooseneck – perfect for capturing the sound of drums and other static instruments.

Visitors to the DPA booth will have the opportunity to win a DPA microphone by having their badge scanned and entering a free draw.

-ends-

Editors information:
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphones and microphone solutions for professional applications in studio, broadcast, theatre, video/film and sound reinforcement environments. All DPA microphones and components are manufactured at the company’s purpose-built factory in Denmark.
For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

NEW YORK’S ALTO NYC BELIEVES IN THE METRIC HALO PRODUCT AND SERVICE PHILOSOPHY

NEW YORK, NEW YORK: Alto NYC is Alto Music’s New York-based professional audio retailer that truly nurtures a reciprocal relationship with the studio owners, musicians, composers, producers, and engineers who list among its clients. Its Manhattan showroom would be better described as a fully-functioning control room, complete with structural isolation, acoustic treatment, and almost every piece of gear imaginable – all just a patch away from a test drive or shootout in a real working environment. Alto NYC treats its clients to a one-on-one experience, with working professionals serving as audio gurus to help guide clients to their ideal, situation-specific solutions. The company sells a wide range of audio converters, and the Metric Halo ULN-8, LIO-8, 2882, and ULN-2 converters have found favor among clients looking for high-end sound and tremendous flexibility.

“The starting point is always obtaining a clear understanding of what exactly a client hopes to achieve,” said Shane Koss, Alto NYC’s audio guru. “Are they building a home studio? A public studio? What are the inputs? The outputs? And of course, what is the budget? I find that a lot of people come in because they have read about this or that magic solution in an online forum or review, and they think that getting it will solve some large issue problem they’re having. Sometimes that’s true and sometimes it’s not. Although it’s probably counterproductive to my bottom line, I often recommend against particular purchases because I honestly don’t believe the gear they’ve set their sights on will address the issue.”

Koss keeps one foot in the retail business and the other foot in the activities that led him to the retail business in the first place: writing music for TV and movies, working with bands, and producing/engineering projects. “Along with my schooling, that real-world working experience has been, and continues to be, invaluable for the work I do at Alto,” he said. “I wouldn’t be able to do what I do if I didn’t actually use the stuff. Background is critical.” Koss recognizes that many aspects of professional audio are irreducibly subjective, but that there is also a large degree of objectivity in the way professional audio equipment is made and priced. “Unless you’re a total cynic and believe that a $4,000 piece of gear is designed and manufactured in the same way that a $500 piece of gear is designed and manufactured, then there is some objective difference between them,” he said. “So the question becomes, ‘what is that difference and is it worth the money?’”

He continued, “Metric Halo converters excel in situations where audio transparency and configuration flexibility are paramount. I have clients come in who need a converter that can do A, B, and C all of the time, D and E when they’re on the road, and F on Tuesdays! Once they learn Metric Halo’s MIO Console, that kind of extreme flexibility is not only possible, it’s easy to implement.” Alto Music sells all of Metric Halo’s interfaces, from the flagship ULN-8, with eight channels of latest-generation preamps and converters, to the original 2882 (updated to accommodate current operating systems and communications protocols, of course).

“The fun part of my job is working with clients to meet their needs,” Koss said. “The unpleasant part is working out the behind-the-scenes details – finding out, for example, why this or that didn’t ship, when such and such will be in stock – that kind of thing. Fortunately, I never get that with Metric Halo. Although they’ve moved to Florida, they still have that New York attitude that I appreciate. It’s no BS – get it done right and get it done fast. Metric Halo is one of those companies that makes a solid product that I believe in – and that’s easy to work with.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

Related Topics: AES Newslink, NAMM Newslink, News |

BROOKLYN-BASED KEMADO RECORDS INSTALLS 32-CHANNEL API 1608

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK: Kemado Records is the latest studio to install a 32-Channel version of API’s popular 1608 console. Kemado, long known for bringing national attention to innovative artists spanning the spectrum from indie rock to heavy metal, choose the 1608 to complement its recent plans for expansion, which included the creation of two new labels (Mexican Summer and Software), a brick-and-mortar record store, and a recording studio in 2009.

Kemado’s founders Andrés Santo Domingo and Tom Clapp are happy to report that the recording studio has seen near continual use and offers clients over 1,000 square-feet of tracking space. Kemado’s new 1608 is housed in the larger of two separate control rooms.

Deciding what would replace the existing console became increasingly clear as the choices were analyzed and rejected, explained Clapp. “We figured that if we were going to replace a classic vintage console, we had to replace it with something in the same respected sonic family. But at the same time, we wanted to avoid the near-constant servicing required of some older consoles. So we decided we wanted something new but still classic, which made the 1608 the perfect fit; it’s a classic console with a classic sound. Plus it’s designed to be in constant use, and the modular design ensures that it can be serviced when that time comes. The other options we looked at were not in the same sonic league with the 1608, nor were they built for the long haul.”

Clapp and colleagues burned the midnight oil and installed the new console in just three days, and synched the 1608 into a fully-decked Pro Tools HD rig with 48in/48out, a Studer 827A tape machine, and a Studer A80 VU mix-down deck. And with so many engineers coming through the door, part of the 1608’s allure was its straightforward topology and signal flow, as was its gain structure. “The 1608 definitely has a modern gain structure, in contrast to many of the choices we reviewed,” said Clapp. Choosing that classic API sound was, in Clapp’s words, a “no-brainer”.

“I’ve worked with API gear before, and I love the fast transients and headroom,” he said. “We even tried 500-series modules from a range of high-end manufacturers to fill out the 1608’s API 500-Series slots, but we kept coming back to the API sound.” To date, eighteen of the available 32 slots have been filled with API 550b 4-band and API 560 graphic EQs. “We’re going to slowly fill the rest of the slots with API EQs down the road,” Clapp promises.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

About

Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication