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API 1608 INSTALLED IN PARIS STUDIO

PARIS, FRANCE – NOVEMBER 2011: A testament to API’s growing global market appeal, one of the company’s renowned 1608 analog consoles has recently been installed in the Paris recording facility STUDIO K. Owned and operated by French musician, composer, engineer and producer David Chalmin, STUDIO K resides in the very center of Paris and offers recording and mixing services to artists from all genres.

“When I decided to invest in a new console, I knew right away that I wanted something with a distinctive sound,” said Chalmin. “I was going to invest a lot of money, and I didn’t want my console to have a ‘transparent’ mixer; I can reach transparency in the digital world. I wanted analog. When you think of analog, you think of color-and when you think of color, you think API. I knew the 1608 had the color I loved: warm and crisp,” he said.

Chalmin, who has worked with acts such as Nadeah, the Labéque Sisters and Nicola Tescari and Sophia Charaï, has been part of the French music industry since joining Beatles “re-elaboration” contemporary, rock band B for Bang in 2006. He is also a guitarist for Nadeah and member of two other groups – experimental/improvisational rock band Dimension X (guitarist) and rock duet Red Velvet (singer, guitarist). Developing a passion for recording, producing and engineering through a makeshift home studio, Chalmin officially opened STUDIO K in 2009 and soon after decided he needed a top-rated console – the API 1608.

“I also chose the 1608 for its modularity,” Chalmin said. “Being born in the digital era, I’m used to having a lot of different EQs [through plug-ins], and, to me, it was great being able to have a console that allowed me to choose different flavors through EQs and other processors. With the 1608, I can evolve the mix along with my tastes or change it by using different modules depending on which project I’m working on.”

Expandability was also a key reason Chalmin chose the console for STUDIO K. “I designed the console’s furniture to fit an expander, which I hope to welcome someday soon. The fact that the 1608 allows you to build upon it little by little makes this top-quality board really affordable.

“It has exactly what I need and not a thousand things I don’t,” Chalmin said. “It’s simple and comprehensive. And it’s the most beautiful console, isn’t it?”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment. www.apiaudio.com

Audinate Partners with Inter-M

Largest South Korean Manufacturer of Pro Audio Licenses Dante™
Portland, OR-Nov. 21, 2011- Audinate announced today that Inter-M, South Korea’s largest PA and installed sound manufacturer, has agreed to collaborate to produce a line of products that will feature Dante, Audinate’s patented media networking technology. Audinate is the creator of Dante, the most advanced audio networking solution that is built using standards based IP over Ethernet.

Inter-M has been building quality commercial sound and professional audio products with a single-mindedness of purpose: “We Make It Easy” for its products to be designed and installed into systems. Known for their P.A Systems, S.R Systems, Consoles, Speakers, CCTV Systems, Wireless System, Microphones and DVR, Inter-M products are featured throughout Korea in Stadiums, Performing Arts Centers, office buildings and Houses of Worship. Inter-M is a publically listed company on the Korean Stock Exchange (KOSDAQ)

“Inter-M is a great brand in Korea and is expanding rapidly around the world.” said Lee Ellison CEO for Audinate. “Inter-M has an aggressive plan to connect their wide variety of products into an integrated system using Dante.”

“We believe having Dante in our systems gives us a definite competitive advantage” stated Wonho Lee, Director if R&D at Inter-M. “We selected Dante because it provides us with an audio over IP solution today, and Audinate is the only company that can offer a viable transition path to AVB for the future.”

Inter-M plans using Dante end-to-end throughout their systems, from Dante-enabled paging microphones, through mixers and distribution units, to Dante-enabled powered speakers.

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About Audinate
Audinate revolutionizes the way that AV systems are connected by transporting high-quality media over standard IT networks. Using Audinate’s patented Dante networking solution, digital media networking just got easy. Audinate’s solution has been licensed by customers across the AV industry and can be found in installations and live sound applications globally. Audinate is a Promoter Member of the AVnu Alliance™. Audinate offices are located in US, United Kingdom and Australia. Dante is a trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd.

Visit www.audinate.com for the latest news and information on the company.

About Inter-M
Inter-M has become a leading company with a competitive edge in the audio, video, and communications markets worldwide. Inter-M strives to make great contributions to the community with new products and technology, with many successful high-profile installations around the world. Inter-M is located in Korea and has been in business for 28 years.

Earthworks SR40V Vocal Microphone Nominated for 2011 TEC Award

Milford, NH, November 17, 2011 – Earthworks Microphones’ SR40V Vocal Microphone, has been nominated for a 2011 Technical Excellence & Creativity Award in the category of Outstanding Technical Achievement, Microphone Technology/Sound Reinforcement.

The world’s first high definition vocal microphone, the hand-tuned and tested Earthworks SR40V delivers extreme clarity and the broadest flat frequency response, as well as the highest levels of feedback resistance available in any condenser vocal microphone. The result is an uncolored high gain vocal microphone with benchmark levels of clarity and resistance to feedback.

The SR40V stays true to the Earthworks foundation of reproducing your sound with the ultimate clarity and faithfulness, from the subtlest nuances of soulful blues, jazz and folk singers to a stinging 145db blast of rock ‘n’ roll emotion. Featuring revolutionary circuitry for flawless sonic performance and a unique blend of balance and precision machining, the SR40V represents the pinnacle of technology and aesthetics in microphone design.

The 27th Annual TEC Awards, presented by the TEC Foundation for Excellence in Audio and NAMM, will be held on January 20, 2012 at the NAMM Show in Anaheim, California. The TEC Awards was established in 1985 to honor outstanding achievement in professional audio production and product innovation. Winners will be determined by members of professional audio and sound production organizations, through online voting conducted by an independent company. Voting takes place from November 1st through 30th.

The winners of the 27th Annual TEC Awards will be announced at a ceremony to be held Friday evening, January 20, 2012, at the Anaheim Hilton as a special highlight of the NAMM Show, the leading international music products trade show.
The SR40V, as well as microphones from the rest of the Earthworks lineup, is handmade and expertly tuned to sonic perfection in our Milford, New Hampshire facility and comes with an unrivaled 15 year warranty.

For additional information, visit the company online at www.earthworksaudio.com.

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DiGiCo SD10 Swings With McCune Audio At 54th Annual Monterey Jazz Fest

Wil Blades Trio

McCune Audio/Video/Lighting has been handling the audio services for the acclaimed Monterey Jazz Fest since the 1960′s. In business since 1932, this full service technical event production company has done its share of myriad events in its nearly 80-year history. They purchased their first DiGiCo, an SD10, and the console made its debut at the 54th Annual Festival this past September.
more

CANADIAN HIT-MAKER PURCHASES API 1608 FOR COMMERCIAL STUDIO

TORONTO, CANADA–NOVEMBER 2011: Since breaking into the music scene in 2002, Juno Award-winning composer/producer Ian Nieman has created an array of hits and remixes for the likes of Mariah Carey, LeAnn Rimes, Nelly Furtado and Jason Derulo – all with the help of his API equipment. Now the owner of a new API 1608 console, Nieman plans to continue making even more Billboard-worthy tracks at his Canadian studio.
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OUT OF THE BOX AND INTO AN API 1608

ATLANTA, GEORGIA – NOVEMBER 2011: When producer Dan Hannon and engineer Brad Fisher decided to purchase an analog console for their production company, they knew just where to turn to get the sound they’d been looking for-an API 1608.
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Peavey Impulse 12D Combines ‘Cutting-Edge Technology’ & ‘Legendary Peavey Durability’

High power, pristine clarity and light weight come together in the Peavey® Impulse® 12D, a portable, powered loudspeaker enclosure that combines Peavey’s revolutionary IPR™ amplifier technology with a true ribbon driver. Pro Audio Review magazine put the groundbreaking Impulse 12D to the test for its October 2011 issue.

“In the [Impulse] 12D, Peavey has done a fantastic job combining legendary Peavey durability; classic touches such as the Black Widow woofer; cutting-edge IPR amp technology, and the uniqueness of the ribbon driver,” wrote Joshua D. Garber. more

CASE STUDY: MIKESOUND USES THE METRIC HALO ULN-8 PREAMP/CONVERTER AS A SONIC SWISS ARMY KNIFE

BLUEFIELDS, NICARAGUA – OCTOBER 2011: Brooklyn-based engineer and producer Michael Gassert, known to his music and film colleagues as “MikeSound,” would appear to spend little time in New York. His uncanny knack for capturing the sonic soul of a musical performance, no matter how remote the location or strained the resources, has earned him the respect of his peers and a full travel calendar. Recently, MikeSound traveled to the Nicaraguan port city of Bluefields (not an easy thing to do) to spend three months recording legendary costeña singers of the regional and endemic musical traditions, most notably Maypole, Mento and Calypso. He relied on a Metric Halo ULN-8′s compact collection of mic-pres, DIs, converters, Character modeling, routing, mixing, and DSP much as an explorer relies on a Swiss Army knife. The ULN-8 was easy to pack and prepared MikeSound to make excellent recordings in unpredictable situations.

A local label, Bluefields Sound System, and MikeSound co-sponsored the project with the help of a small grant from UNESCO. The connection between BSS and MikeSound began five years earlier when together they captured a documentary about the Bluefields musicians. Although MikeSound planned to record some of the same musicians, as well as new performers this time around, the stars of this effort would be two legends of Nicaraguan music, local rivals Mango Ghost and Sabú. Now septuagenarians, the two musicians had defined the musical landscape of Bluefields, but, despite their cultural importance, few recordings of their music have survived. Although young for their age of seventy-something (a local legend has it that Sabú, who still does the splits on stage, is actually more than two hundred years old), the label recognized that the opportunity to record their genius was finite.

Nicaragua’s only international airport is in Managua, on the western side of the country, and a mountain range stands between it and Bluefields on the eastern side of the country. Travel options between the coasts are limited to an eight-hour bus ride plus a three-hour panga boat ride through the jungle, or a mostly reliable puddle jumper instead. MikeSound’s journey with his mobile rig would take him by land, air and sea. “When we conceived the project, I knew mobility and compactness would be essential,” said MikeSound. He began with a four rack-space Calzone case and selected his equipment carefully. “The Metric Halo ULN-8 was the centerpiece,” he said. “That and my MacBook Pro would be the starting point for every recording.” In addition, he brought a Furman P-1800 AR voltage regulator/power conditioner (electricity in Bluefields is reliably unreliable), an RME Fireface 800, and an API 3124 four-channel mic pre.

Bluefields Sound System has makeshift studio, complete with egg crate diffusion and old clothing stuffed into the walls for isolation, that MikeSound planned to use for final vocals, acoustics and keys. However, the studio was too small and dead sounding to do justice to the rhythmic backbone of Mango Ghost and Sabú’s music. Therefore, he spent a month recording the entire songs live to a click in an outdoor restaurant, La Loma, at the highest point in the city. “It’s quiet and calm up there,” he said. To protect himself from the notorious Bluefields thuggery, MikeSound set up and tore down the session every day. He tracked with Digital Performer 7 using a collection of AKG, Shure, Sennheiser, and Schoeps microphones.

“I’ve been a fan of Metric Halo for a long time,” said MikeSound. “They make fantastic preamps and converters, a fact that, by itself, makes their gear stand out. But on top of that, the ULN-8 offers Character modeling, full-blooded DSP, and flexible routing. The character modeling is some of the best I’ve ever heard. It can be very subtle but very authentic and does a nice job of warming things up when needed. And the DSP is also top-notch. The ‘HaloVerb’ sounds as authentic as the UADs I use back in Soho.” MikeSound took advantage of the ULN-8′s flexible routing by creating custom DB-25 cables that allowed him to deliver in-the-box headphone mixes for all of the musicians. “Because I had to set up and tear down so frequently, it was a great time saver to have all of the monitor configurations recallable,” he said.

Currently back in New York and working with partners to launch a new indie label, No Shame, MikeSound also has kept busy for the past six years as the engineer of the Master Musicians of Jajouka, and is completing the mixes for Bluefields Sound System, which will be released in 2012.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Based in New York’s Hudson Valley, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware. www.mhlabs.com

To learn more about and hear some samples from Bluefields Sound System visit: www.bluefieldsound.com To also check out the Master Musicians of Jajouka at: www.jajouka.com/ and No Shame: www.facebook.com/wehaveNoShame

API ANNOUNCES KIMLENG AUDIO AS NEW JDK DEALER

JESSUP, MARYLAND – OCTOBER 2011: After representing API for the past two years, Kimleng Audio has recently been signed as a dealer for the company’s JDK Audio line. The signing is an important step in increasing both API and JDK’s presence in the Asia Pacific.

“After meeting with Thanong Saeheng recently at the Broadcast Asia show in Singapore, I’m even more convinced that Kimleng Audio is the right way for us to go in Thailand,” said Gordon Smart, managing director at API. “They’re focused, street-smart, and tuned into the market. I don’t think we could have made a better choice.”

Thanong Saeheng, owner of Kimleng Audio, said, “We are so glad that API thought of us when it came time to make JDK a prominent audio brand in Thailand. We’re looking forward to helping the brand reach the forefront of the professional audio world.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment. www.apiaudio.com

For information on Kimleng Audio, please visit: www.KimlengAudio.com

Minnesota Church Stays On Leading Edge of Technology With Upgrade To 96k/Optics-Capable SD10 Console

Minnesota’s Eagle Brook Church prides itself on staying at the leading edge of technology for its ever-evolving production and broadcast needs. In 2010, the thriving house of worship, which opened in late 2005 and accommodates over 2100 in stadium-style seating—retooled its overall technical infrastructure at its main Lino Lakes campus location, adding three DiGiCo SD8 consoles and DiGiRacks for FOH, monitors and video broadcast production. Flash-forward to the spring of 2011, and the audio team is at it again. Working closely with Audio Logic Systems, the latest upgrade set in motion swapped two of the SD8s at FoH and monitor world with one of DiGiCo’s newest 96k/2 gig optics-capable SD10B broadcast console loaded with the DiGiCo Waves SoundGrid plug-in bundle. They also added three SDRacks, one dedicated to the SD10 and the other two distributed within the facility. In turn, the two SD8s and DiGiRacks were migrated to the Spring Lake Park and Woodbury facilities. The changes at the main Lino Lakes campus had a ripple effect throughout, allowing all the Eagle Brook engineers at each facility to mix on similar DiGiCo platforms.

Audio mix pro Adam Bufis was brought in to work as audio director, to transition and streamline the multiple facilities, to facilitate the newest gear integrations, and to provide a mix position for the broadcast hub at the main location. With a decade of touring experience working with major Christian artists from Casting Crowns to Lincoln Brewster, and Israel Houghton for the last several years, Bufis brought a savvy technical prowess and mixing expertise to the church. The choice of the broadcast console offered many great features for live sound and for Bufis, including 5.1 surround, fader backstop solo and more.

“Originally, the radar was out to get a newer or bigger desk at our main broadcast location,” Bufis explained. “I’d mixed a ton on the SD7 and have a lot of experience on that and with DiGiCo, and really liked the added benefits available with the optical network. We started to look at what it would take to get an SD7 into our main campus as our needs were growing there. We also wanted to bump up to 96K, and I personally wanted to bring in the Waves plug-in package. So when the SD10 came out, it was almost a no-brainer just the cost-factor. With the SD8s, I was filling all 60 channels plus returning stuff with insert returns on groups, so to expand it out to a bigger channel count was almost a necessary move for us. With our ever-expanding band and orchestra, and all the loop/track/bass stuff, that starts adding up as does the input channels. Another big push for me was to get it all running on optical, using an RME MADI bridge for distribution. Before, we were running RME MADI signals to a bunch of different areas for recording and multitrack stuff. With the optical network, it just made the whole system a lot more functional and easy to use, versus flipping switches and changing routing on the MADI bridges. I can do it all basically at the desk now.

To accomplish his optical networking dream, Bufis was able to run an HMA fiber optics loop for backup redundancies and a total of 2 SD Racks, and 1 DiGiRack placed in various locations in the building—two near the stage and one in the broadcast studio—to supply the different audio feeds from each source. “The addition of the SDRacks, even at 48K took a step up! It had a much more clean and clear sound. I’ve always been a fan of the DiGiCo sound anyway, but it made a noticeable difference to us merely by just changing that. And then once we bumped up to 96K, it was even more of a noticeable difference with overall clarity and sonic performance.”

At FOH on a typical weekend, Bufis estimates Eagle Brook is running 40-45 inputs total to handle its service flow, which he says is a 50/50 mix of music and message. “We rely heavily on the production aspect for our worship experience, using LEDs, video, lighting and of course audio. We have a full band comprised of drums, bass, a few guitars, usually 4 stereo keyboard channels-worth of inputs, sometimes a small horn section of 3-5 pieces and normally we’re running anywhere from 5 to 8 background vocals and we incorporate a lot of loop-based stuff from Pro Tools. Typically, I’m running anywhere from 2-10 channels of anything from a percussive loop to a string loop to a vocal loop or whatever, and on our bigger weekends, we incorporate orchestral string sections, the biggest of which was 30-pieces, where I was running 101 analog inputs and 60 digital ones. I was able to lay the SD10 out so that I could change scenes and inputs, and to generally manage that many inputs on not a whole lot of faders for the live side of things.”

As for outputs, the SD10 is accommodating quite a few in the sanctuary for its “robust” PA. “As our room seats just under 3000 in our main campus, I have a few different hangs with group outputs going to each zone: my main L/R, main outhangs, separate controls for front, outfills and subs, and we have a 70-volt distribution system throughout the building that handles mainly overhead-type speakers that we send a feed to. I also have a full split for our broadcast suite SD8, that is outputting all 24 groups of stereo outputs to 48 digital input devices from DVRs to digital recorders to our broadcast send. We use a Mako system that utilizes microwave technology to send point-to-point signals to our other campuses, which is how they receive our simulcast message in HD video and AES audio. We have a center HD screen in each location that comes down right to the stage floor with a 6’ projected image of our pastor, and it surprises most people because it’s pretty life-like. All of that is done in HD, from the filming to the projection to the broadcast, and it’s pretty impressive. It gives the small church building a large church feel. All campuses have a live band and their own worship pastor, so outside of running our Lino Lakes simulcast sermon, it gives each of the satellite locations the opportunity to be unique.”

When asked to single out some of his favorite features on their new console, Bufis couldn’t help but rave about the SD10’s expandable GPI and GPO connections, as well as the configurable Smart Key Macros. “The GPI/GPO is huge! I love using GPI triggers out of my console to fire lobby music to start, credits to roll, and for my CD to start and stop recording—all of that is all pre-programmed in my snapshots and then controlled through GPI triggers. That, on the setup side of things, has made rolling through show time very seamless, and has taken it almost from a two-man job to a one-man position at FOH, where I’m firing everything from hardware to music. Also, I love the Smart Keys on the SD10. I love identifying them with coloring and digital labeling. Having more than just the macro buttons, I’ve started getting into more advanced shows where I have 80-100 snapshots, and it’s nice to lay those out on the Smart Keys to visually go to something quickly if I need to. I’d say those are the two biggest things I’ve found to love. However, I have to say I also really like the black color of the console. Black and gray are my two favorite colors, and the look of it is very stealthy.”

It was important for Bufis to add the Waves SoundGrid bundle in order to streamline and simplify his outboard gear. “All of our outboard gear is now completely gone; we ripped out all our BSS and Drawmer outboard stuff and now I am basically rocking the Waves SoundGrid and the console at FOH. I love all the onboard offerings from DiGiCo, but the addition of the Waves package has given the console a new character. In particular, I use the Mercury bundle quite a bit, which gives me a plethora to pick through. I use a lot of the CLA compressors on vocals and drums, and the Fairchild compressors used on bass and guitar give it an amazing character. Basically, I don’t use any onboard compression right now; most of it is done mainly through the CLA or the Fairchild’s. I do use the SSL master bus on the output of the master. I’ve started to use some of the SSL channel strips for some of the EQ and on a few vocal channels, and I use another inserted SSL or CLA EQ. Again, sonic performance is key for me and I just love the sound of some of these compressors. I’m using about 12 of the 16 racks, racked on various drums, mainly rhythm section inputs, and I’m using the compressors on vocals. I’m using one Ultramaximizer, usually on my outputs, as well as for broadcasting, so it has a more mastered sound going out to our campuses.” There are lots of things to access in my toolbox artistically.

At monitor world, he also swapped out their in-ear monitoring system. “Before we were using an Aviom system for a segment of the in-ears as we have a split of mixed ears as well as personal mixers in use. Stepping up to the new Roland M48 mixers, they have an SMADI device, which takes a MADI signal and converts it to their REAC system, allowing me to pipe a MADI signal from the console to feed to the Roland units. That too, was a pretty night-and-day upgrade for us. It has great functionality and really expanded what we do by allowing me to assign each mixer its own set of channel counts. Before, with the Aviom system, you only got a generic 16 channels to patch to. Now, with the Roland, you can patch everybody’s mixer separate from each other. It gives you a whole lot of flexibility with band members wanting specific things on those mixers.”

Bufis is running a Pro Tools rig on the FOH console, routed off a MADI connection from the SDRack and uses the GPI/GPOs to trigger the start and stop of those session files within Pro Tools. This was key in order to streamline both FOH and monitor functions into one console. The use of Smart Key Macros was key in managing monitor outputs. “The snapshots there are pretty robust and using the macros to lay those out functionally and color-code them is huge, as is the ability to rack more than two racks. We quickly grew out of just having two racks into three, and now even four and five MADI devices. So with the SD10, we can have a couple of optical racks and MADI racks needed in both those positions.”

With services on both weekend days, the audio team has built in time on Sunday morning to do a recap of previous productions. This playback is a way for everyone, including the band, to take a disconnected look and listen to the overall production experience and to share feedback on what works and what needs improvement. “We’re getting amazing feedback from them on how the whole system is performing, from the sonic quality to the mix. I would say, from musicians to pastors alike, the addition of the SD10s, SD Racks and optics, has definitely been an improvement and noticed by all, which is amazing as many of us come from a secular and Christian touring background and bring more of a show-type mentality to how things are done here. We like the term, ‘go big or go home.’ We try to stay relevant and like keep an eye out on what other houses of worship within the US are doing and I think in comparison, we fare quite high. All of us hold to a pretty high production value and standard and we’re pretty progressive on stage and set design, too. We’re constantly adding gear to stay on top of the latest technology. For us, the addition of the newest DiGiCo console was such a great thing. When I look at a console, the biggest thing for me is the sound quality. I can kind of get around hard-to-function desks or ones that may not be as intuitive if the sound quality is there. What I love about the SD10 is it has it all: a massively huge sonic quality and an easy to use, intuitive, fully functional user interface. And that for me, hands-down, is why I think it’s the best for us as a facility and for me as a mix engineer.”

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