A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive of the NAMM Newslink Category

VIRGINIA ARTS RECORDING INSTALLS AN API 1608

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA – MARCH 2014: As part of a complete architectural and electronic renovation, Virginia Arts Recording recently replaced its large-format digital console with a sixteen-channel API 1608 analog console with API’s P-Mix fader automation. The north-central Virginia-based studio has been serving local musicians, labels, and radio stations for over thirty years. The current owners, Chris Doermann and Sean Dart, are embracing that history and the industry’s pivot to analog with the new API console and a 24-track, two-inch tape machine. Virginia Arts Recording also retains all the professional digital platforms with top-end converters to allow projects to effectively hybridize between the two technologies.

Virginia Arts Recording resides in a historic house in southeast Charlottesville, just miles from the University of Virginia campus. A little over a year ago, the coupling that merged the city water supply and the house’s water heater on the second floor failed just as everyone was closing up shop for a holiday weekend. “When we returned, the control room, and much of the equipment was totally wrecked,” recalled Dart. “The digital console was one of the casualties, but we decided to make the most of it. We wanted to put the studio on solid footing for the next twenty-five years.”

Analog consoles, tape machines, ADATs, and a steady progression of DAWs all had a place in Virginia Arts Recording’s history. Doermann and Dart decided to build a hybrid analog/digital studio with a workflow that made negotiating the two technologies transparent. “We definitely wanted an analog console, and we pride ourselves on capturing big drum sounds,” said Dart. “That’s API’s signature talent, so naturally we chose the 1608.”

Doermann and Dart took an API factory tour as a part of their research. “Interacting with API is a different experience,” said Dart. “Mark Seman of API invited us to the factory, and we packed a few mixes that we know well. API let us see everything, and gave us a few hours behind the 1608. It sounded amazing, and the feel of real faders has been a welcome relief from menus and double clicks. I just get in there with my hands, and thank API for giving us the recording feel we were missing.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608, and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

VETERAN MIX ENGINEER TONY MASERATI RELIES ON METRIC HALO PLUG-INS

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – MARCH 2014: If mix engineers had the same cultural currency as sports heroes, Tony Maserati would be a household name the world over. The veteran mix engineer has worked with all of the music industry’s biggest and brightest stars, from Lady Gaga to Notorious B.I.G., from Mariah Carey to Puff Daddy, and from Christina Aguilera to R. Kelly. Recently he completed three weeks of mixing for Beyoncé’s self-titled “surprise” release. Maserati is the sound of major label pop, and the in-demand engineer maintains an outrageous schedule that would make your eyes bleary just to hear it. Obviously, Maserati will not suffer anything less than the very best in pro audio equipment for his sessions, both in terms of sound quality and performance, which is why he relies on Metric Halo ChannelStrip, HaloVerb, and Multiband Dynamics plug-ins. Maserati likes their stellar sound quality, easy and quick interfaces, and rock solid performance.

“The sound quality of Metric Halo’s classic plug-in, ChannelStrip, is what first caught my attention and made me aware of the company,” Maserati said. “I often see ChannelStrip on the sessions I get handed; in fact, several of Beyoncé’s tracks came in with it. ChannelStrip is still my go-to plug-in for routine and extreme equalization and dynamics. There’s something psychologically appealing about having six EQ bands at the ready, and the presets get me where I need to be quickly.”

The quality of a plug-in’s interface is very important to Maserati because he has to move fast. “I don’t have the time or patience to sit around and figure things out,” he said. “Metric Halo’s GUIs are intuitive to understand, and the automation is simple and easy to work with. HaloVerb is a good example of a plug-in that sounds great and is easy to dig into with great results.” While paying careful attention to the density of his reverb plug-ins and outboard gear, including the delicacy of the tail, Maserati’s busy schedule also demands a very functional interface. He has used HaloVerb on guitars, vocals, and percussion to great effect. One of his new tricks is to run a dry signal through HaloVerb and then send HaloVerb’s output into a distortion box. “The stress of that sound is really interesting to me,” he said. “Sometimes I’ll automate the send so that I get that stress only on certain notes. It’s great.”

Maserati also has to pay careful attention to the load he puts on his Pro Tools system. “Pop sessions get really gigantic,” he said. “They come in with a lot of plug-ins, I add a lot of plug-ins, and I’m also using 32 hardware inserts and two print tracks; one that’s maximized and one that’s not. It’s not just a storage system, and it’s not just an automation system. I’m taxing it, and a lot of math is happening!” These days, he’s using an HD native card, and the fact that all of Metric Halo’s plug-ins are AAX works well. “My plug-ins have to be totally solid,” he said. “The code has to be well-written; if something’s broken, I just won’t go near it. Metric Halo has a long history of solid performance that uses surprisingly little DSP resources. A testament to Metric Halo’s stability is the fact that I’m now using Metric Halo’s Multiband Dynamics plug-in on my mix bus. That’s unusual for me, and I wouldn’t do that if I wasn’t completely confident.”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

The Music Producers Guild Introduces Mastering Engineers To Broadcast WAV

As the music industry prepares to adopt the Broadcast WAV file format as the best means of embedding ISRC data into future recordings, the Music Producers Guild is hosting an event to highlight the importance of this initiative and give recording professionals the information they need to make it a success.

The event, which is primarily aimed at Mastering engineers, will take place at the Hospital Club in London on the evening of April 9th, 2014. It is sponsored by digital audio workstation manufacturers Magix/Sequioa, Merging/Pyramix and Prism Sound/SADiE, all of whom have recently announced their support for the initiative by backing file exchange between their systems.

Headed by Alchemy Mastering’s Barry Grint, the MPG has led a strident campaign to get Broadcast WAV accepted by the music industry in place of ordinary WAV files, which don’t contain a method for embedding ISRC information. Their efforts have been successful as the boards of both the BPI and AIM have now recommended to their members that this new format be adopted.

“Our event on April 9th is the only opportunity Mastering engineers will have to understand and prepare for this format change,” Barry Grint explains. “Each of our DAW sponsors will demonstrate how the ISRC embedding process fits within their workflow, and how they are working together to ensure seamless exchange of the data between all of the workstations. This is a massive step forward for the industry and we really hope that Mastering engineers and other recording professionals who are interested in ISRC will take the opportunity to come along and learn more.”

Grint adds that the importance of ISRC cannot be understated. ISRC, which stands for International Standard Recording Code, is uniquely allocated to every song recorded. These codes are then registered with royalty payment agencies, thus ensuring that recording artists and copyright holders are properly remunerated for their work when it is played on radio or TV.

Broadcast WAV, the professional WAV format created by the European Broadcasting Union, can carry ISRC information and this is why MPG is so keen to see is adopted by as the de-facto standard for music interchange in the production process.

“The inclusion of ISRC information will remove the need for it to be re-entered and reduce the opportunity for error,” Grint says. “The new system is simple to implement and, once adopted, it will allow ISRC to flow through the whole production chain.”

The MPG’s aim is to establish ISRC as the cornerstone of every aspect of digital asset management, from tracking and reporting through to royalty reporting and song identification. This will give the entire music industry a robust and secure system for identifying tracks, and who had input into their creation, so that it can safeguard the incomes of all artists and copyright owners.

Ultimately, the adoption of BWF as standard will provide a cornerstone for the MPG’s Credit Where Credit is Due campaign, which aims to highlight the woeful lack of credit information within the digital domain.

“Our overall goal is to ensure that all music creators receive proper credit and proper payment for their work, and having an industry-standard technical solution that allows credit information to be included in the metadata is a major step forward in achieving this ambition,” Barry Grint says.

To register for this event, please visit: http://www.mpg.org.uk/events/279

-ends-

About Music Producers Guild (UK):

The Music Producers Guild (UK) is an independent and democratic organisation that encourages the highest standards of music production, and actively engages with other music industry organisations to campaign and lobby on matters of important mutual interest.

The MPG represents and promotes the interests of all those involved in the production of recorded music, including producers, engineers, mixers, re-mixers, programmers and mastering engineers. www.mpg.org.uk

RF VENUE INTRODUCES RF OPTIX™

ASHLAND, MASSACHUSETTS – MARCH 2014: Wireless audio manufacturer RF Venue has released the RF Optix™ RF to fiber optic conversion system, a powerful new tool for mainstream wireless microphone users that expands the possibilities of antenna distribution and wireless audio design.

“RF Optix brings technology from the world of broadcast and IT into the reach of church, school, and theater wireless users,” says CEO Chris Regan. “Integrators, tour managers, and church technicians are now able to do things with fiber that would have been way out of budget, or downright impossible, with coaxial cable.”

The RF Optix system leverages the low cost, lossless characteristics of fiber optic cable over the expensive, fragile, lossy characteristics of coaxial cables. Fiber cable runs thousands of feet long are possible with negligible in-line attenuation, so antennas can be remoted in venues far away from racks or equipment rooms located elsewhere in the facility.

“One of the main constraints for distributed antenna systems for wireless audio is the cost and signal loss challenges of coax cables,” says Regan. “This is especially true for plenum installs, where plenum rated coax can exceed the cost of the entire audio system. With inexpensive plenum rated fiber cables, system designers can now rethink their equipment layouts without sacrificing the huge performance benefit of using a remote antenna system for their wireless system.”

The RF Optix system is offered as a single channel for connecting to one antenna or in a dual channel package for diversity antenna systems. The Install Package includes wall or rack mountable flanges and the Live Package includes a hard-shell carrying case. Both options include 10’ BNC to SMA adapter cables for connecting to antennas and wireless rack equipment; 9V screw-on power supplies are also provided. Available accessories include 100m single mode plenum fiber cables and 100m indoor/outdoor reinforced fiber cables. Custom fiber cable lengths are available.

ABOUT RF VENUE RF Venue is a new wireless audio company specializing in remote antennas, RF distribution equipment and RF signal management and monitoring systems for audio/video installations and live sound events.

http://www.rfvenue.com

Contact RF Venue at 800-795-0817 or email orders@RFvenue.com for further details.

GRUNDORF ANNOUNCES 75-110 COMPACT RACK DRAWER FOR WIRELESS SYSTEMS

**** Photo: Grundorf model 75-110 Compact Rack Drawer ****

Council Bluffs, IA – March 2014… Grundorf Corporation, a leading manufacturer of equipment for musicians and audio professionals, is pleased to announce the company’s new model 75-110 Compact Rack Drawer for wireless racks. Featuring a rugged metal design with multiple compartments and foam lining, the new Grundorf 75-110 Compact Rack Drawer is the ideal accessory for adding dedicated storage space to protect one’s valuable microphones. The 75-110 Compact Rack Drawer is the perfect rack accessory for touring musicians, audio professionals, and AV technicians in presentation environments, House of Worship, and DJ’s. more

ACCLAIMED MASTERING ENGINEER MATT COLTON RELIES ON ATC SCM150ASL PRO THREE-WAY ACTIVE REFERENCE MONITORS

WEST LONDON, U.K. – MARCH 2014: Matt Colton has been mastering albums for fifteen years. He continues to build on his growing reputation, mastering for the likes of Coldplay, James Blake, Gary Numan, and Metronomy, and his work recently earned him the title of “Mastering Engineer of the Year” from the Music Producers Guild. He has worked at several of London’s most esteemed mastering houses, including Porky’s Mastering, Optimum Mastering, AIR Studios, and Alchemy Mastering, the last of which he recently re-launched with original owners Barry Grint and Phil Kinrade. To maintain his edge, Colton installed a pair of ATC SCM150ASL PRO 3-way active loudspeakers in his critical listening room at the new Alchemy Mastering in West London.

For Colton, there’s more to mastering than simply having access to the latest and greatest ear-bending analog and digital signal processing technologies. “The things that are really important are the acoustics, speakers, amps, convertors, and power supplies, along with the wiring that connects them all together – everything that affects the sound in the room,” he said. “You cannot get around that. So I would rather have a great-sounding room and a workstation with a couple of plug-ins than every piece of hardware ever made and a poor-sounding room, because, no matter how much you say you understand the room, we all react to what’s coming out of the speakers and make our judgments based on how it sounds in the room. If the room is too bassy then the recording is going to be bass light, even if we know the room is too bassy.”

Fundamental to Colton’s current way of working is a pair of ATC SCM150ASL PRO 3-way active loudspeakers. “Having worked at AIR on a really lovely pair of hi-fi speakers, I felt I wanted to go back to studio monitoring and have something that maybe sounded a bit less polished in terms of the actual sound that’s coming out of the speaker,” he said. “So I’m working on a pair of SCM150ASL PROs. I’d previously worked on a pair of SCM200s many years ago, which I loved.”

An unconventional demonstration convinced Colton that the SCM150ASL PRO patently met his critical listening criteria: “I did a lecture at Westminster University in Harrow to over one-hundred people in a really big lecture hall with a massive ceiling height of fifty feet or so. Ben Lilly of ATC brought along a pair of SCM150s and I played some James Blake records with really low sub-bass – down at around 35Hz – and they just sounded glorious. It was a wonderful experience to hear those records played in that room only on a pair of speakers. So, on that basis, I’ve got the 150s in my mastering room – sadly, not quite as big as that lecture hall!”

With well-honed listening skills, Colton is perfectly positioned to provide honest insight into the SCM150ASL PRO in action at Alchemy Mastering. “They’re a direct and honest pair of speakers,” he said. “If the mix sounds good, then it sounds good here; if it doesn’t, then it doesn’t. There’s no flattery on the part of the speakers, though they’re wonderful to listen to when you get it right. I’ve really enjoying working on them.”

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm. www.transaudiogroup.com

DANLEY SOUND LABS SEEKS INTERNATIONAL DEALERS AND DISTRIBUTORS AT PRO LIGHT AND SOUND

GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA – MARCH 2014: Danley Sound Labs, manufacturer of innovative loudspeakers and subwoofers, will be at booth 8.0N60 (Hall 8.0, Booth N60) at Pro Light & Sound in Frankfurt, Germany March 12 –15, 2014. As Danley approaches its tenth year in business, its solid foundation in the house of worship and theater markets has expanded exponentially into the arena and stadium markets with the introduction of the Danley Genesis and Jericho horns, which deliver line array coverage from point-source designs. To support and sustain that growth, Danley is seeking international dealers and distributors in several key locations to join its team. Interested parties should either contact Jonathan “J.P.” Parker, Director of Sales, and Chad Edwardson, Applications Engineer, or meet them at Pro Light & Sound.

“Although we have many areas of the world covered, there are still numerous holes in Danley’s global dealer and distribution network that need to be filled,” said Parker. “We’re looking forward to meeting with candidates at Pro Light & Sound.” In addition to a collection of its established models, Danley will have its new OS 80 weatherproof loudspeaker and its new SBH-10 Skinny Big Horn at the show. Danley designs have made a big splash in the American and European sports arena market, with Genesis Horn and Jericho horn installations at football stadiums (Lambeau Field and Ralph Wilson Stadium), college American football stadiums (Louisiana State University, Arizona University, Brigham Young University, Michigan State University, and Northwestern University, among many others), and as well as indoor sports arenas.

To set up an appointment contact: J.P. Parker (jp@danleysoundlabs.com) or Chad Edwardson (chad@danleysoundlabs.com)

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

48-CHANNEL ANALOG API VISION CONSOLE PLAYS A PART IN FILM

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE: A 48-channel API Vision console has had a large impact on the fortunes of Ward Archer and his enterprise, Music+Arts Studio. Twenty-five years ago, Archer closed a chapter of his life at the helm of an ad agency to found Archer Records. Six years later, he opened the David Cherry/George Augspurger-designed studio to cater to the label’s artists and has not looked back since.

Music+Arts Studio launched with a 48-channel, discrete, all-analog, surround-sound API Vision console, and prominent members of Memphis’ indie film scene became regular clients over the following years. Like a locomotive building momentum, Music+Arts Studio is currently attracting more and more film work from an expanding geographical base. The ratio of film-related to pure music projects is creeping up on 50:50 thanks, in part, to the API Vision.

“These days, I’m comfortable saying that we have a lot of experience with sound for picture, but that’s owing to some clients that rolled the dice with us in the beginning,” said Archer. “One of our earliest and greatest successes was The Gospel According to Jazz Chapter III, which was recorded live at Reid Temple in Maryland. We took those tracks – which sounded amazing from the moment we pulled them up on the API Vision – and mixed them for stereo and 5.1 [which the Vision is designed to do simultaneously]. The Vision has a transparency and an airiness on the top end that just sounds gorgeous.” The track “It’s What I Do” won a Grammy for Best Gospel Song.

In addition to the API Vision and a killer live room, Music+Arts Studio has catered to its client base by adding an eight-foot Stewart Filmscreen and high-definition projector for film mixing. “It’s a nice, cinematic experience for the director or music supervisor,” said Archer. “We’ll even crank up the [5.1 PMC] monitoring system a bit for the full effect.” The scope of Music+Arts Studio’s film work ranges tremendously, from ADR to scoring to mixing. For example, all of the score recording for the Matthew McConaughey-led drama, Mud, were recorded using the warm analog sound that the API Vision’s circuitry provided. Other projects include the indie film, Cigarette Girl, and mini-series, Headshop.

Despite the film industry windfall, Music+Arts Studio still enjoys tackling strictly-music projects for artists on the Archer Records roster. Recently, Amy LaVere completed Stranger Me, her fourth studio album on Archer Records. Studio manager and engineer Daniel Lynn assisted the project’s producer and engineer Craig Silvey, who had just finished mixing Arcade Fire’s Grammy-winning release, The Suburbs. “Silvey loved the Vision,” said Lynn. “I remember that there was one point during the mixing where we wanted to do some complicated bussing, and it wasn’t immediately apparent how to do it. I called API and got someone on the phone right away. Craig was impressed that we had that kind of rapport!”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

(PHOTO CAPTION) Music+Arts Studio Manager/Engineer Daniel Lynn (right) pictured with Colin Hay (Men at Work) during a recent session.

DPA’s d:facto™ Vocal Microphone Wins New Fans

ran Healey, the lead singer of UK band Travis, and Marti Pellow, the lead singer of Wet Wet Wet, are the latest in the growing list of vocalists to switch to DPA’s d:facto Vocal Microphone. In both cases the artists made the change on the recommendation of their live sound engineer, Tom Wiggans.

“I have no problem recommending DPA’s new d:facto microphone because I’m so impressed with the results it has delivered for Fran and Marti – and for Dougie Payne, Travis’ bass player, who is also using one for his backing vocals,” Wiggans says. “Before I tried d:facto, I had tried quite a few new vocal microphones that made big promises, but always ended up going back to the microphone that people have been using for over 40 years. However, the d:facto’s clarity and ability to capture the true sound source without extraneous background noise has made a real difference to the way I work. I now have much more time to concentrate on other details because my vocal fader is just vocal, I don’t have to deal with anywhere near as much ambient mush bleeding into the mix.”

Tom Wiggans was introduced to the microphone by Rob Ramon, product manager for DPA’s UK distributor, Sound Network.

“Rob was at one of the gigs Travis played at the Roundhouse in London, and afterwards he came backstage and introduced himself,” Wiggans said. “I was already familiar with DPA having used the company’s overhead and instrument mics. When I heard about d:facto I was keen to try one, so Rob arranged a demo. I didn’t get a chance to try it until we were in Paris a few days later. Pablo Wheeler (Travis Monitor Engineer) and I were able to do an A/B comparison with it against the mic Fran usually used. It sounded amazing – so good that after the show I realised I was going to need better reverbs. The difference was really noticeable.”

After such a positive experience, Wiggans was happy to specify two d:facto Vocal Microphones for the rest of the Travis tour, which was taking in a number of South American cities.

“I had one for Fran and one for Dougie, both of whom were delighted with the way their vocals were sounding,” Wiggans says. “We then flew straight to some Scottish shows, and unfortunately all our equipment went astray so we had to borrow stuff for a couple of shows. Thankfully, our gear arrived for the last show, and as soon as the band walked on stage and spotted we had the mics back everyone was much happier. Missing something when you don’t have it is always a good indication of how good it is.”

After completing the Travis tour, Tom Wiggans took his d:facto vocal microphones straight out on the road again – only this time with Wet Wet Wet.

“My original plan was to have Marti try the mic in rehearsal so that we could see how he got on with it, but he was having none of that,” Wiggans says. “He wanted to try it straight away so Chris Trimby (Wets Monitor Engineer) just threw him on stage with it, blind. The d:facto sounded brilliant from the off and Marti was absolutely chuffed to bits. He liked the weight and feel of it in his hand. From a performance point of view he felt it was really well balanced.”

Tom Wiggans has also been using DPA’s d:vote™ 4099 Instrument Microphones to capture drums and brass. These were supplied by SSE Audio Group in the UK and used on the Travis tour.

“The minute we miked up Neil Primroses’ drums with the d:vote 4099, everyone was blown away,” Wiggans says. “People were coming up to me and asking what I’d done to make the drums sound so ‘real’. All the attack that you get with acoustic drums was there – it sounded like you were standing right next to them, only through a PA. They were just as good on Wet Wet Wet’s brass section, which tends to be quite loud. Once again there was no problem with feedback or rejection.”

Both Travis and Wet Wet Wet will be playing live in coming months – Travis is off to the Far East in March/April, while Wet Wet Wet has a number of racecourse gigs lines up for the summer. For Tom Wiggans and for the lead singers, the choice of microphone is now easy.

“It will be DPA’s d:facto without any doubt,” Wiggans says. “From now on, when it comes to vocal mics, it’s always going to be my first choice.”

-ends-

About DPA
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to provide you – whether you’re in live sound, recording, theater or broadcast – with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for your tasks. DPA takes no shortcuts in the design processes nor makes any compromises in manufacturing, which is all done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability, and above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound.

For more information, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

FOH ENGINEER ANDY TORRI BRINGS METRIC HALO GEAR TO BIG HEAD TODD AND THE MONSTERS

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA – FEBRUARY 2014: Although Andy Torri enrolled at a Colorado music school in the late 1980s to carefully prepare himself for a life in the world of professional audio, it was a chance meeting at a local bar that held his destiny. Mutual friends introduced Torri to Todd Park Mohr, frontman for the rising act, Big Head Todd & the Monsters. The two became friends, and shortly after Torri found himself at another bar, complaining to Mohr about how hard it was to find sound engineering work in the studios around Colorado. He expected only friendly commiseration, but got a job offer instead.

Since then, Torri has had only two main jobs: FOH engineer for Big Head Todd & the Monsters and studio engineer at KBCO in Boulder. The first gig, from which he took only a short reprieve between 2005 and 2012, took him from guitar-tuning-tee-shirt-sales-plus-mixing-duties in the smoky haze of local bars to his current position of respected FOH engineer at venues of all sizes around the Intermountain West and the nation. At KBCO, Torri engineered in-studio performances by Sting, Coldplay, Stevie Nicks, Dave Matthews, Jack Johnson, Elvis Costello, Willie Nelson, Robert Plant, and countless others. Most of those recordings found their way to KBCO’s wildly popular Studio C Session CDs, the proceeds of which went to charity.

Torri is one of those engineers who trained in the analog world and then successfully navigated the hills, valleys, and occasional rock slides to the state-of-the-art-hybrid digital/analog world that we currently live in. As he personally navigated that transition, he accumulated digital solutions from Metric Halo, and once he grabbed them, he never let them go! The first of those solutions was Metric Halo’s SpectraFoo sound analysis software. “It’s been a constant for me, both live and in the studio,” Torri said. “I love its flexibility. It’s easy to create custom pages of all the tools I need for a particular job. I also love the precision of those tools. I can zoom in or out on frequency, amplitude, or any other parameter and get as much detail or overview as I need.”

Big Head Todd & the Monsters play everything from clubs to theaters to amphitheaters, and the span between load-in and show-time is seldom ample. “We use in-house console and PA system,” Torri explained. “Every day is different, and every system has its own particular quirks.” Using his Metric Halo 2882 interface, Torri takes a feed from the board and compares it with output from a measurement microphone. He continued, “I use the Spectragraph and Spectragram a lot. They immediately reveal the hot spots and trouble areas of a particular system. After correcting those problems, I balance the system using SpectraFoo and some combination of pink noise and my own personal favorite ‘sound engineer songs.’”

Occasionally, Torri will find himself at a venue with sufficient outboard or console-based processing that he can dial in Todd’s voice and the rest of the mix using it. That’s the exception however, and he usually relies on the 2882’s DSP resources and his Metric Halo MIOStrip plug-in. “In addition to getting sound into SpectraFoo, I use the 2882 and MIOStrip to dial in the vocals,” Torri said. “I often use them on bass and/or the house mix as well. The Metric Halo system is rock solid, so I’m comfortable using it live. And it sounds fantastic. A while back, I mixed down some greatest hits tracks using every method of summing that was available to me, including using the 2882’s 80-bit summing. I gave the mixes to the mastering engineer without telling him what all the different codes stood for – it was a blind test. Every time, he chose the 2882 summing. It has a depth and definition to the panning and a warm, solid low end.”

Much like SpectraFoo and the 2882, Torri finds Metric Halo’s MIOStrip to be a tool for all occasions. “MIOStrip has a great sound, which is obviously very important,” he said. “The functionality is great; cuts and gains can be very subtle or very aggressive.” For vocals and instruments, Torri often pairs MIOStrip with the 2882’s “Character” processing, which models different flavors of analog circuits. He usually uses “Soft Sat.”

“Working with Metric Halo has been about more than just the gear,” Torri concluded. “The people behind the company are great. They create great products and stand behind them: SpectraFoo is seventeen years old, and the 2882 is twelve years old. It’s all well supported, updated, and totally relevant. What other company can say that?”

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

About

Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication