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FSR Continues Tradition of Helping Local Kids Gear Up for Class

Manufacturer Offers Much-Needed Support for United Way’s “Backpacks 4 Kids”
School Supply Program

Woodland Park, NJ – FSR, a Passaic County-based manufacturer of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, continues its support of the local community by once again partnering with United Way of Passaic County for its highly successful “Backpacks 4 Kids” program, the largest of its kind in the region. By donating essential school supplies, such as 50 backpacks filled with notebooks, erasers, pens, pencils, erasers and crayons, along with 50 lunch boxes, FSR joins other local businesses and the United Way of Passaic County in their efforts to help more than 900 local students in the region with the essential school supplies they need for the school year ahead.

Part of a larger United Way initiative and a combined effort between area businesses, the “Backpacks 4 Kids” mission is to send students back to school in the Fall equipped with the tools they need to succeed.

“We are honored to participate in this outstanding program that helps properly prepare our local kids for the next school year,” said Jan Sandri, FSR’s president. “As an active member of the Passaic County community, FSR continues to support the United Way’s mission and steadfast principle that every child, no matter their background, can thrive if they have the proper tools to support their educational goals.”

“Education is key in order for our children to reach their life’s goals and objectives and create for themselves successful careers,” said Yvonne Zuidema, CEO/President of the United Way of Passaic County. “With the contributions and generous support of our local residents and businesses, such as Jan Sandri and her team at FSR, we are able to help develop the community leaders of tomorrow.”

FSR manufactures audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, from its headquarters in Woodland Park, NJ.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

All FSR products are designed and manufactured in its Woodland Park, NJ facility. The company is an Energy Star Partner and complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to demonstrate its deep commitment to preserving the planet. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information: www.fsrinc.com.
# # #

FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmoon.tv

Yamaha CL Digital Console Update V 1.7 Available in December

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. announces the December availability of Version 1.7 software upgrade for the Yamaha CL Series Digital Audio Console. The upgrade, available via free download, is based on significant end user input and will provide enhanced efficiency and versatility along with significant improvements that will be especially valuable for mixing engineers in festival and similar complex event setups. Several of the features implemented in V 1.7 will make the CL an even better console choice for festivals, since many of the new features are already familiar to PM5D users.

New CL V 1.7 features include Selective Load/Save for set up data such as scene memory, libraries, etc., can now be individually loaded from or saved to USB memory providing an efficient way to load complex setup data. The HA Option for changing input patches now makes it possible to select whether the end user wants to use the HA settings from the patched port as is, or copy the channel HA settings to the patched port in order to quickly change input patches when mixing in a fast-paced environment without having to copy HA settings.

“As with all Yamaha Commercial Audio products, updates are implemented based on suggestions primarily from our end users,” states Marc Lopez, Marketing Manager, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. “Their input is quite essential, now, and for future generation of products.”

CL V 1.7 updates also include: in the Sends On Fader mode, the assignable encoders (Gain/Pan/Assign knobs) can now be used to adjust channel level and panning for sends to stereo buses. Custom Fader Bank setups can be stored to, and recalled from, individual scenes. At busy events that involve multiple engineers, this feature can make it easy to change custom fader bank settings without having to switch users. And, the sends from input channels to buses on which the send point is set to PRE, can now be assigned to DCA groups for muting via a DCA Mute Option for PRE sends.

Other new features in CL V 1.7 include improved Channel Name Display In the Sends On Fader mode where channel ON/OFF status is now indicated in the channel name display. Additionally, a “black” 9th color has been added for the Channel Color Bar. More points are available in the Metering Point field on the meter display with the addition of “Pre GC Meter” and “Post Digital Gain Meter”.

Also in CL V 1.7, the Analog HA gain and Digital HA gain indication have been improved and are both displayed in the Selected Channel View Gain/Patch field at all times. The HPF status of R Series and similar external HA units are shown in the Gain/Patch field as well. DCA/MUTE group and mute name display are now shown in the DCA/Mute Group Assign Mode pop-up display. Improved Channel Link display indicators in the CH Link Mode pop-up display will make it easy to see current link group settings.

In addition to the above new features, CL V 1.7 includes Extended Cue monitor adjustment range that extends from -30 dB to +20 dB. It is now possible to specify whether latched or unlatched external switches are connected to the GPI input ports. And, when mounting I/O devices on the Dante network, the device type can now be detected without the description in the device label, allowing for better customization of names.

For more information on Yamaha CL V 1.7, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Iconyx Makes it Clear at Mizzou Aquatic Center

Columbia, MO – November 2013…. The University of Missouri has a well-deserved reputation for going the extra mile for its student body, and their Student Recreation Center is a case in point. With a range of indoor and outdoor facilities to meet almost any discipline, their Mizzou Aquatic Center is just one of several jewels in the crown. The Aquatic Center’s 50 meter pool and Diving Well have hosted numerous high-profile competitions, including Big 12 Swimming and Diving Championships, USA Swimming Series, and NCAA meets.

Since its opening in 2005, the Aquatic Center had also been known for its problematic acoustics. With its soaring glass and concrete walls, massive steel roof, and abundance of reflective surfaces, announcements were literally drowning in the din. That is, until the Center installed their new Iconyx digitally steered column array system.

“The original audio system never really provided the coverage they needed,” explains Brian Noerlinger, with the Overland Park, Kansas offices of Conference Technologies, Inc. “The speakers were mounted at about 56 feet high, and the intelligibility factor was close to nil.”

The ceiling’s height created strategic challenges as well. “One of our biggest obstacles was taking the old speakers down,” says Noerlinger. “The largest lift we could get into the building only went to 40 feet. Erecting a scaffold would have called for draining the pool, which wasn’t an option. So I put a couple of pieces of conduit together with a couple of pulleys and a spring and a rope, and essentially made a big long tree trimmer. I threw a rope around the speakers, pried them off and reached up and cut. I had one heck of an audience watching from below.”

As challenging as it was to get the old speakers down, installing anything else at that height would have proven impossible. “The original plan had been for the Iconyx to be part of the design, along with hanging additional speakers to replace the old ones,” says Noerlinger. Instead, CTI worked with the Renkus-Heinz engineering team to design a system to cover the entire space using only three Iconyx columns.

The system is comprised of a single Iconyx IC16-R-II column in the center, flanked by IC8-R-II columns on either side. “One of the IC8 columns covers the diving well area, with the IC16 at dead center and the other IC8 down at the far end of the pool,” says Noerlinger. “With just those three columns, we were able to achieve a consistent 110 dB coverage across the entire seating area.” A CFX218S dual 18 inch subwoofer adds low end punch and power to pump up the crowd.

Intelligibility is also dramatically improved, Noerlinger adds. “Having the ability to control our point sources and direct the sound exactly where we wanted it — and more importantly, to steer it away from the places we didn’t want it — made a tremendous difference. The sound in there now is crystal clear.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS REVITALIZES THE AUDIO AT THE HISTORIC SUFFOLK THEATER

RIVERHEAD, NEW YORK – NOVEMBER 2013: The Suffolk Theater in historic downtown Riverhead, New York opened its doors for the first time in 1933, and the public faithfully filled its resplendent art-deco interior night after night. Movies put the theater in the black for decades, but proliferating strip malls, the rise of the multiplex, and America’s seedy love affair with the living room couch decimated the Suffolk’s crowds and led to its final performance in 1987. The story is hardly unique to The Suffolk, and twenty years passed before area residents realized what they lost in the bargain. In the past decade, the tides turned, and, under new ownership, The Suffolk Theater responded with the sound of renovation. It recently reopened to tremendous fanfare, and beneath its carefully-restored Depression-era art-deco façade breathes a 21st Century audio/video/lighting system that includes a 36-input/20-output Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 Dante networked DSP system.

Award-winning theatre and A/V designer Stuart Allyn of A.D.R. Studios (Irvington, New York) designed and commissioned the new theatrical/audio/video systems at The Suffolk Theater, and Theatrical Services and Supplies (Hauppauge, New York) installed it. “Of course, a lot of thought goes into every aspect of a system like this,” said Allyn. “I went with the SymNet Radius 12×8 because it’s a cost-effective processor that is totally flexible, both in terms of its processing power and its input/output count.” The Suffolk Theater needed a large number of inputs and outputs because the entire system throughout the building is fed from the central FOH position. A wide number of areas (bars, offices, restrooms, backstage, etc.) are all capable of receiving the main show audio (and video in some cases) plus each area, at the touch of a button, can optionally receive a local source such as cable TV or a Blu-ray player. Each area when viewing the stage feed must be time aligned to the stage, and when viewing local sources that timing needs to be synced to the video. Each “zone” required speaker processing for each mode of operation. By having all the system processing centralized and separate, sound mixers using the digital mixing system are free to use whatever systems, EQs etc. they desire to use in the console, while the main speaker and system processing remains in place. The Symetrix system handled all that very easily. To the twelve inputs and eight outputs of the system’s single Radius 12×8, Allyn added two Symetrix SymNet xIn 12 expansion boxes and one Symetrix SymNet xOut 12. Like all products in the Symetrix SymNet Radius and Edge family, the expansion boxes connect to the processor via the robust, low-latency Dante network protocol.

“We’ve used a lot of Symetrix products in the past, and we’ve never had issues,” said Allyn. “Symetrix equipment sounds good and works well at commissioning and over the long haul. In addition, I like using SymNet Composer to build customized processing. I can see the entire system on one screen, and that overview is important to me. Then I can drill down as needed.” The system includes comprehensive Crestron control, but that didn’t stop Allyn from making cost-effective use of Symetrix’ inexpensive ARC-2e wall panel remotes. Eight ARC-2e’s placed at strategic locations in ancillary rooms and spaces allow users to select from presets and to change input sources and volumes. Indeed, several of the Symetrix ARC-2e’s send command strings to the SymNet Radius 12×8 system and to the system’s Crestron video switcher!

Although the super low latency Dante network plays no larger role in the system, the scalability of the Symetrix SymNet system via Dante was a critical factor in its selection. “We designed the system with foresight of possible future expansion in mind,” said Allyn. “There’s a lot of extra wiring in place that will allow them to expand the stage and the dressing room areas. If needed, we can simply add another Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 to the system via Dante to accommodate even more inputs, outputs, and processing. It is a beautiful venue that should provide great entertainment to Long Island for many years to come.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

API APPOINTS STUDIO CONNECTIONS AS AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR

NUNAWADING, AUSTRALIA: API proudly announces the appointment of its new Australian distributor, Studio Connections for both API modules and 1608 console sales. Studio Connections has been a dominant player in the Australian pro audio market for over twenty years, and has recently completed relocation to its new facility in the Melbourne suburb of Nunawading. The new location is designed with the professional in mind, and prominently features a 1608 demonstration room, offering pros hands-on experience with the console and other API gear.

“Our new facility is fabulous and funky,” said Studio Connection’s Managing Director, Deb Sloss. “We intend to be a relaxed and welcoming space where customers can drop in for a coffee, a chat, and be able to experience all the great gear from API, including our own fully-operational 1608 console.”

Studio Connection’s longstanding association with the finest audio manufacturers highlights their commitment to the Australian pro audio market. Working closely with their network of dealers, the staff at Studio Connections pride themselves on customer service and are eager to expand the API presence in Australia. “We have witnessed an unprecedented level of interest in API products from our dealers and end users alike,” said Sloss. “API carries a rich heritage of extremely high-quality audio products and consoles. It’s been extremely gratifying to receive such wonderful support and endorsement from this appointment.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS 12X8 DANTE NETWORKED AUDIO DSP DELIVERS PRESENT AND FUTURE AUDIO EXPANSION FOR WISCONSIN HIGH SCHOOL

JACKSON, WISCONSIN: Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School serves over four hundred students from in and around Jackson, Wisconsin, a town 45-minutes northwest of Milwaukee. In the last decade, the school has expanded its facilities, and the crowning jewel of that expansion is the 750-seat Performing Arts Center. The center includes facilities for the school’s choirs, bands, and theatrical productions, as well as a state-of-the-art venue for Kettle Moraine Lutheran High School and other area schools and artistic organizations. Because funds were limited, the school asked Professional Audio Designs of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin to build a cost-effective sound reinforcement system that could start with simple coverage for Sunday services and have the ability to scale up to handle full theatrical productions as the funds became available. To accommodate that challenging request, Professional Audio Designs built the system around the Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 Dante Network Audio DSP.

“At the outset, the money allocated to the sound reinforcement system was generous, but the building itself ran way over budget,” explained Kim Leonard, president of Professional Audio Designs. “They came back to us and asked us to pare down the sound reinforcement system initially, while at the same time laying the foundation for the more expansive system that they will eventually have. That future vision includes a full-sized mixing console, dozens of mics and inputs, and a full stage monitoring system. But for now, they have a modest four microphones and a line-level input. We’re using the SymNet Radius 12×8 to auto-mix them.”

With the core system now in place, Fulcrum Acoustics loudspeakers powered by QSC amplifiers provide high-impact, high-fidelity coverage of the auditorium’s seating area. Three Symetrix Radius 12x8s provide the modest processing needed for basic sound reinforcement and will go on to provide the more advanced processing necessary. A Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote control gives users simple and intuitive control of volume for all four microphones, volume control for the line level input, and an overall master volume control.

When they get the funds, the school can simply plug in the digital mixer, the assisted listening system (ALS is installed now), the online streaming system, and a back stage monitoring system. Additional Symetrix ARC-2e units in the control room, in the house, and on a future portable backstage paging rack complete the system. Importantly, the simple quick-mix system that is already in place is selectable from the main ARC-2e so that the school and church can hold simple events and services without requiring an audio technician on hand.

“The whole system is networked via Dante,” said Leonard. “We built a primary network and a secondary network for backup. We’re glad Symetrix is leading the charge with fully-integrated Dante technology. It’s extremely cost-effective and robust and the fidelity is excellent. In addition, we always use Symetrix with Fulcrum loudspeakers because the FIR filters required by Fulcrum are fully supported within the SymNet software.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

SYMETRIX SYMNET EDGE AND RADIUS DSPs HANDLE PERFORMING ARTS CENTERS IN HOUSTON’S KATY SCHOOL DISTRICT

HOUSTON, TEXAS: The rapidly growing Katy Independent School District serves over 65,000 students in the greater Houston area. To meet their growing audio and visual media demands, school officials recently earmarked funds to update the performing arts center A/V systems in four of its seven high schools. Broadcast Works of Tyler, Texas was contracted to do the installation and used SymNet Edge and Radius AEC open architecture Dante network audio DSPs.

“The old A/V systems were 1990s vintage and entirely analog,” explained Aaron Comer, project manager with Broadcast Works. “The system designer, Erich Friend of Teqniqal Systems assessed their existing systems and determined that they could transform the performing arts centers from outdated to cutting-edge by revamping only the front end and control systems. The existing QSC amplifiers and Renkus-Heinz loudspeakers were basically in excellent shape.”

Although the original design called for another DSP manufacturer, Comer and his team lobbied hard for SymNet Edge and Radius DSP. “We had worked with this other manufacturer’s products in the past, and it was always a challenge,” he said. “In contrast, we’ve done a lot of Symetrix jobs, and they always go well. Ryan Curtright, Symetrix’ senior technical sales engineer, worked with us to put a nice package together centered on SymNet solutions. Based on our past experience, we knew it would work well and reliably… and would save the district some money.” The new systems make use of the Dante network’s stability and flexibility to send signal long distances without copper and provide digital patch bays that allow users (including first-year students) to select among each stage’s 70+ inputs for allocation to a 48-channel Avid SC48 console.

Stage inputs include a multitude of wired input plates together with a portable rack feeding a SymNet Edge and SymNet xIn12 expander. Rather than home running all of the stage inputs back to the sound booth, as in the old design, the new system uses a stage-located SymNet Radius AEC to collect them for transfer to the sound booth via Dante. That same Radius AEC, together with a SymNet xOut12 expander, receives the final house mix from the sound booth (again via Dante) for output to the stage-located amp rack. The portable SymNet Edge rack pairs up with a sixteen-count wireless microphone system or an additional twelve-count hardwired microphone collection and can connect to the system via any one of four Dante ports located around the stage.

Each sound booth contains three SymNet Radius AEC units with additional input cards, three SymNet xIn12s, and three SymNet xOut12s. Broadcast Works designed a custom computer interface using Symetrix’ SymVue software that allows users to connect any input source to any channel on the Avid SC48 console. In turn, the console outputs thirty-two channels that feed back into the SymNet system for transfer to the amp rack via Dante. “The students love it,” said Comer. “We trained a group of freshmen who had zero experience with a system like this. Within a couple of hours, they were completely comfortable and playing with the whole thing. Despite its complexity from our perspective, SymVue makes it simple from their perspective. They get it.”

For less elaborate events, Broadcast Works gave each school an iPad outfitted with Crestron control that would allow them to turn the system on with a minimal number of commonly-used microphones and input sources. The iPad gives them control over which commonly-used inputs are active, their individual volumes, and the overall volume.

The new systems’ easy learning curve made it possible for the theater and music departments in all four schools to start production on fall programs without delay. A few of the highlights include The Wizard of Oz, a Masquerade Serenade concert, and a play called The Cherry Orchard.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

DANLEY SOUND LABS LOUDSPEAKERS AND SUBS CONTRIBUTE TO TRUE STEREO IMAGING AT FIRST FREE CHURCH

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS: First Free Church has been a cornerstone of spiritual life in Rockford, Illinois since 1884. Over the decades, First Free has occupied several buildings of ever-growing size and, since the advent of A/V technology, ever-growing technical sophistication. Its current sanctuary seats close to 1,800 congregants in an arc spanning nearly 180 degrees, with a balcony and under-balcony area that stretches from wall to wall. Tired of poor coverage from a faux-LCR system of mid-1990s vintage, First Free hired SVL Productions of nearby Cherry Valley, Illinois to build a new system that would provide nearly every seat with crisp stereo imaging. Of course, this would be no small feat to achieve. SVL Productions turned to Chicago-based Johnson AV Engineering to help design and commission the new system, which relies on the tight pattern control of Danley Sound Labs loudspeakers to meet – and then greatly exceed – the church’s expectations.

“Music is a vital component of First Free’s services,” said Aaron Johnson, president and principle engineer at Johnson AV Engineering. “The old system had three clusters to cover different wedges of the room’s wide arc, but despite the fact that they were set up as a Left-Center-Right system, none of the seats had any true imaging to speak of. The church wanted true imaging, where each instrument seems to emanate from the empty space between the loudspeakers, but that’s very hard to achieve in such a wide arc. You can’t simply place a couple of clusters on either side of the stage and expect even coverage and convincing imaging. The relative volume and time delay of each loudspeaker at the listener’s location have to be nearly equal to make the stereo effect work.”

The solution was to divide the room into three 60-degree wedges, each of which would receive its own stereo image. Although that’s easy to conceptualize, it’s very difficult to actually implement because almost all loudspeakers spill energy “off-axis.” That spillover would cross the dividing line between one wedge and the next and destroy the stereo imaging effect. “Danley’s tight pattern control made it the obvious choice for this application,” said Johnson. “No other loudspeaker manufacturer comes close to Danley’s razor-sharp pattern control, which extends even to lower frequencies.”

Because of their specific coverage patterns and the geometry of the room, Johnson specified a Danley SH-60 on top of a Danley SM-96 at each loudspeaker location for coverage of the main seating area. A total of six such clusters comprise the main system: three sets of left and right. Four monophonic Danley SH-Micros provide front fill for seats very near the stage. Partitions separate six under-balcony areas, four of which seat thirty to forty each and two of which seat only eight. For the larger partitions, a stereo pair of Danley SH-Micros deliver convincing stereo imaging, whereas a single Danley SH-Micro in each of the smaller partitions deliver a monophonic summed signal.

“I don’t know of another loudspeaker that can achieve the kind of pattern control that Danley has managed,” said Brent Hayes, president of SVL Productions. “Aaron and I walked the room during commissioning, and it was truly astounding to step just past the edge of one loudspeaker’s pattern. It fell off immediately. One more step and we were clearly into the pattern of the next loudspeaker. I remember seeing it on paper, but it’s a whole other thing to experience it.” Johnson agreed: “I love that Danley products always model exactly like they work, and they work exactly as you expect them to.”

But the miracles of great pattern control don’t stop with the loudspeakers at First Free Church. Johnson designed a directional subwoofer cluster comprised of three Danley TH-118s flown near the ceiling, just in front of the stage. By paying careful attention to each unit’s phase and signal delay, the bass volume on stage is a full 18 dB lower than it is in the seats, which is an obvious and significant difference. The dividing line is, in Johnson’s words, “like a curtain,” and even the first row of seats is fully immersed in bass. By keeping so much low-frequency energy off the stage, the sound quality captured on stage by open microphones is much better and far less likely to growl or feed back.

Processing support for the new system is extensive, as proper alignment required a separate processing channel for almost every individual loudspeaker and subwoofer. BiAmp Audia provides that fine-scale level of control. Because the Danley loudspeakers and subwoofers require only a single amplifier channel, the total number of amplifiers was kept to a minimum, but the sheer number of loudspeakers and subwoofers involved still amounted to an impressive 26 channels. Powersoft K-Series and Ottocanali-Series amplifiers provide that power. “The new system requires more power to the loudspeakers and subs than the old system did, but the efficiency of the Powersoft units allow us to draw less AC power!” said Hayes. “As a result, we didn’t have to call in an electrician. Moreover, their physical compactness left an entire rack from the previous installation wide open. In summary, we had more processing channels, more amplifier channels, and more loudspeaker power, but less current draw and less space consumed.”

New video projectors and screens, together with a new high-end Chauvet lekos and LED lights completed the installation.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

Slovak National Theatre Upgrades to IC Live

Bratislava, Slovikia – November 2013… Completed in 1886, the Slovak National Theatre was designed by Viennese architects Ferdinand Fellner and Hermann Helmer. Since 1920, the ornate, 1,000-seat building has been the seat of the Slovak National Theatre opera and ballet ensembles. The hall has also hosted performances by some of the world’s top opera and ballet talents.

Its acoustics, however, have come under more scrutiny. The room’s very short reverberation time, while acceptable for opera, doesn’t suit orchestral performances. Its narrow stage faces a long auditorium where the rear seats are 75 ft (22 m) away. Uneven sound coverage confronted its numerous balconies.

A subtle sound reinforcement system, effectively invisible to the audience, was needed, and the theater approached MediaTech, Bratislava’s largest pro audio company.

EASE analysis led to them recommending the IC Live digitally steerable system by Renkus-Heinz. Its clear, uncolored musical sound, the ability to steer multiple sound beams into specific areas of the audience offered precisely the solution that was needed. And its slim, low profile design — complete with a custom paint finish – complemented the theatre’s décor perfectly.

The system includes extra reverb for orchestral shows via a TC Electronics M6000, with a Yamaha PM5D console linked directly to the IC Live system via CobraNet. “The audience had to be unaware of sound reinforcement,” says MediaTech’s project manager Miroslav Paciga. “IC Live allowed us to achieve that subtle effect while being visually unnoticeable.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

NOW YOU CAN MIX IN THE BOX

JESSUP, MARYLAND – OCTOBER 2013: Automated Processes Inc. (API) takes great pleasure in announcing the latest addition to its line of highly acclaimed analog consoles: THE BOX® project console. THE BOX is specifically designed for audio professionals with project or home studios who require a smaller format console with that “big console sound.” True to its heritage, THE BOX features the same circuitry, performance and legendary API sound as the company’s highly successful Vision, Legacy Plus and 1608 consoles. The new console debuted to a highly enthusiastic AES show in New York, and is now shipping from the company’s factory in Jessup, Maryland.

“THE BOX offers an easy, turnkey solution for recording and mixing,” said API President Larry Droppa. “It’s a great option for people who record a few channels at a time, but demand the warmth and punch that a large API console delivers. In addition to four inputs, full center section control, and 16 channels of API’s famous summing, the icing on the cake is a classic API stereo compressor on the program bus. Now you can truly record and mix… in THE BOX.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

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