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API 1608 CONSOLE INSTALLED AT UPSTATE NEW YORK’S SOUNDSCAPE STUDIO

BUFFALO, NEW YORK – APRIL 2013: James Calabrese, owner of Soundscape in Buffalo, New York has purchased a 32-channel 1608 with an expander. The veteran composer, engineer and studio-owner chose the 1608 console as the prized piece of his upstate New York dwelling.

“I first heard an API when I was in New York helping to cut tracks for Miki Howard’s debut album Come Share My Love and the engineer used a Lunchbox to EQ the massive electric piano part,” says Calabrese. He has been in the market ever since.

His studio also features other API gear such as the 3124 four-channel mic pre, a 500V rack, and four 550 EQ’s, as well as two 525 compressors, now in the console. The console was purchased from API rep, Vintage King of Detroit.

James started as a composer, where he recorded original music for commercials, corporate and broadcast video scoring, in pop, rock, jazz, and classical styles. Some clients include Fisher Price, Hasbro, Xerox, Kodak, Phillips Electronics, and artists like Pointer Sisters, Ray Charles, and the Goo Goo Dolls. He even co-wrote the track, Where You Are on Whitney Houston’s multi-platinum second album, Whitney. “I’ve collaborated with New York composer Ken Higgins to score a few films and documentaries along with the globally-syndicated miniseries Hemmingway for Daniel Wilson Productions,” he says of his experiences.

As of late, he has completed sessions on his new 1608 with pianist arranger transcriber Krista Seddon, remixed a tune for LA-based guitarist Michael Campagna for a Varese Sarabande library, and has also mixed an Old Navy commercial.

“There really wasn’t any other choice,” says Calabrese. “I’m still only at the beginning of my knowledge of the 1608; still learning the center section, love the sound, love the build quality and I’m looking forward to some larger tracking sessions in the next few months. I liked the fact that API was going to be around a while. I wanted a desk that I’d probably keep the rest of my career.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

St. Andrews Lutheran Church Chooses Earthworks Choir Microphones

Maple Grove, MN, April 23, 2013 – Kevin Crow, Vice President of Audio Video Electronics announced that their firm has utilized 8 Earthworks ChoirMics™ in the sanctuary of St. Andrews Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi, Minnesota. Mr. Crow says that their firm specializes in acoustics, sound, video & stage lighting systems primarily in the house of worship market, but also works in the hospitality, corporate and education markets. “Earthworks is one of our very top choices for choir microphones in many of our church installations,” states Crow. “Earthworks is one of our strong preferences because they fit a really good niche for us.”

“Along with the customer Brad Nelson, Front of House Engineer for St. Andrews, we chose the Earthworks ChoirMics™ for the St. Andrews Church installation because they have a massive choir,” explains Crow. “Their sanctuary seats over 1200 people. Even though their choir may project well into the room, we still like to mic the choir because it really fills the room. We positioned the ChoirMics on the various sections of the choir (soprano, alto, tenor & bass). In this large sanctuary, the ChoirMics are virtually invisible from the congregation,” says Crow. “Even when photographed with a telephoto lens the ChoirMics are hard to see.”

“The main reason we prefer the Earthworks microphones, is because of their sound quality and gain-before-feedback. The sound quality that we obtain from the Earthworks sound element is just unbelievable,” says Crow. “There is also a giant organ very close to the ChoirMics, which is the largest organ in the state of Minnesota. It is a miracle that we can get as much sound from the choir with the organ and mics placed where they are. It is a real testimony to the exceptional quality of the Earthworks microphones.”

“After this installation was completed, church leaders and members comment on the improvement of the choir sound quality on nearly a weekly basis. These comments are typically: ‘The music sounded good before, but sounds so much better now.’ The improvement in sound quality is due to the use of quality microphones and a quality sound system working together. There are Earthworks ChoirMics into a Midas Legend mixer through an L-Acoustics Kiva/Kilo loudspeaker system. It’s like having all the best ingredients, you only need good music and this church has that for days,” says Crow.

“We end up recommending Earthworks microphones all the time, because they are the only high definition microphones in the industry. In addition they also offer more gain-before-feedback than any other microphones that I have ever seen. We use the Earthworks FlexMic™ podium microphones all the time, which is hand-down the best podium microphone in the world. I would also like to add that St. Andrews church also has an Earthworks PianoMic™, and they really love it.”

Crow concludes, “The use of Earthworks High Definition Microphones™ enables us to design and install very impressive sound installations. Needless to say, we are great fans of Earthworks microphones.”

For information on the Earthworks ChoirMics or other High Definition Microphones please contact Earthworks at 603-654-2433 ext. 114 or by email at sales@earthworksaudio.com.

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SYMETRIX SYMNET RADIUS 12×8 DSP BREATHE FRESH LIFE INTO ST. LUCY PARISH

CAMPBELL, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 2013: For nearly a century, St. Lucy Parish has been a cornerstone of religious life in Campbell, California. Its congregation grew steadily throughout the 1900s, prompting moves to ever-larger facilities, and culminating in the construction of a 1,200-seat sanctuary in 1967. Today St. Lucy Parish holds daily mass in that sanctuary, and on the weekend it is filled repeatedly for multiple masses, many of which use different musicians and groups that tailor their messages to different groups. Recently, the church hired local A/V integrator Zamar Media Solutions of San Jose to replace its decades-old sound reinforcement system. The new system is centered on a pair of cost-effective Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 DSP, which network together seamlessly using the Dante protocol and provide customized, open-architecture programming.

“St. Lucy Parish had been limping along with an insufficient sound system that was twenty- or thirty-years old,” explained Michael Dow, president of Zamar Media Solutions. “It was characterized by rack mixers with big knobs and inadequate ceiling speakers. I drew up a proposal for them a few years ago, but they decided to wait.” However, the old system recently failed completely, and they called me up. I dusted off my earlier proposal and made a few edits to bring it up to date.” For example, Dow had originally specified Symetrix SymNet Express DSP, but with the new Symetrix SymNet Radius 12×8 now available, he recognized that it would provide more processing power, a better I/O count, and near-zero latency Dante networked audio.

In addition to the new DSP, Dow and Zamar Media Solutions customer, system Programmer Tim Fairbairn equipped St. Lucy Parish with an entirely new front end and an entirely new loudspeaker system. Four new Shure ULXD digital wireless microphones replaced their old wireless mics. In addition, new Audix MG15 podium microphones and a pair of Audix M1255 condensers for the choir provide full-frequency capture worthy of the system’s back end. Music playback devices, an on-stage PreSonus band mixer, and multiple input jacks complete the input list. Powersoft’s M-series amplifiers power Martin Audio OmniLine loudspeakers and subwoofers, arrayed as left-right main, left-right side fill, and center subs. Distributed sound provides coverage throughout the building. Additional outputs include a Listen Technologies assisted listening system and a Denon PMD580 MP3/Wave recorder.

“There are a lot of differences from service to service, both in terms of the musicians present and in terms of the audio media required, and St. Lucy Parish is benefitting from the SymNet Radius 12×8’s ability to customize the processing on each of the many input channels,” said Dow. “Between the two boxes, we have twenty-four inputs and sixteen outputs, and any input can be sent to any output because they are networked together using Dante. We’re happy to see that Dante is being embraced by the industry because it’s easy to use and has almost no latency.” Fairbairn and Dow programmed the SymNet Radius 12x8s using Symetrix’ SymNet Composer software, which proved to be a transparent upgrade in feature set from the previous design software, SymNet Designer. “Users control the system using an Extron TLP 1000MV ten-inch touchscreen, which communicates with the SymNet Radius 12×8 system, the Furman power sequencing, the Denon PMD850 recorder, the music playback devices, and the entire dual screen projection system.

Fairbairn was present at the choir’s first experience with the new system. “The choir members were absolutely floored by the quality of the new sound system,” he said. “Indeed, this marks the first time ever that the choir can be heard by the rest of the congregation. During practice, the choir members took turns touring the seating area while the rest kept singing so that everyone could hear how well the choir can be heard now. Also, while the organist was playing for the choir, the choir could be clearly heard over the organ, a new experience! I overheard a lot of happy responses to the system at the following mass, such as ‘night and day!’ and ‘remarkable!’”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix engineers high-end professional audio solutions, specializing in DSP hardware and software. Symetrix products are distributed worldwide, and designed and manufactured in the U.S. at the Seattle area headquarters. Since 1976, customers have enjoyed the benefits of Symetrix’ independent ownership and management. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

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ASHLY AUDIO LICENSES AUDINATE’S DANTE™ DIGITAL NETWORKING

WEBSTER, NEW YORK – APRIL 2013: Ashly Audio, maker of powerful, high-performance, cost-effective signal processors and amplifiers, have licensed Dante digital media networking solution from Audinate. With low latency, robust synchronization, I/O scalability, and simplicity of installation via standard IT technology, Dante will significantly enhance the power and value of Ashly’s range of signal processors and amplifiers.

Dante is built on IT standards, and is a complete media networking solution. Dante delivers a low-latency, tightly-synchronized, sample-accurate playback, while simplifying installation and configuration of A/V networks. Dante has become the leading solution of choice for a variety of professional applications as it demystifies audio networking.

“Ashly Audio is known in the industry as a leader in networked power amplification and signal processing, addressing multiple professional audio applications,” says Director of Sales at Audinate, Dave Anderson. “We are pleased that Ashly has recognized Dante as the most interoperable networking solution available, and look forward to a range of products as they come to market.”

Noted President, Ashly Audio, Mark Wentling, “Ashly is excited to be able to offer our customers yet another option in digital connectivity for our DSP processors and DSP enabled power amplifiers. Dante from Audinate currently brings the best in flexible, yet robust digital audio transport, to the pro-audio and commercial-sound installation markets.”

Audinate revolutionizes the way that A/V systems are connected, by transporting high-quality media over standard IT networks. Dante is robust proven solution which is widely deployed in hotels, transportation centers, shopping centers, public address systems, live sound reinforcement, theaters, concert halls, stadiums, athletic venues, corporate boardrooms, universities, broadcast facilities, recording facilities, houses of worship, government facilities, and courtrooms.

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 37-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

ABOUT AUDINATE Audinate’s patented Dante media networking solution has been adopted by eighty OEM manufacturers in the professional audio/visual industry and is a Promoter Member of the AVnu Alliance™. Audinate offices are located in US, United Kingdom and Australia. Visit www.audinate.com for the latest news and information on the company. Dante is Digital Media Networking Perfected. www.audinate.com

Dante is a trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd. Audinate is a registered trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd.

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Gary Allan
Tour Stop: Yamaha and NEXO All the Way

LANCASTER, Penn.—The place was the American Music Venue in Lancaster, PA. on a late day in March. Country artist Gary Allan
performed in support of his latest CD “Set You Free”. Bauder Audio (Horsham, PA) provided a NEXO GEO S12 line array for the date with support from Tom Hogle, Bauder systems engineer and Sean Gary, A2 for Gary Allan. 24 NEXO GEO S12s over eight RS18 Ray Subs were all powered and processed with NXAMP4X4 amplifiers.

“Besides the fact that the GEO S12 sounds great, it is easy to set up which makes for a quick load in,” states Hogle. “NEXO continues to manufacturer studio monitors for large venues!” remarked Chris “Sully” Sullivan after mixing front of house for the show.

Tucked behind the NEXO arrays, Jason Spence specified a Yamaha PM5000 console for the entire Gary Allan tour, provided by Sound Image of Nashville. “We had options and, in fact, listened to other consoles, notes Spence. However, after listening to the 5K, Gary and the band chose to go analog. The production requirements did not necessitate a digital mixer so we went with the PM5000.”

For more information on the NEXO GEO S12 and Yamaha consoles, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

PHOTO ID: Left: Bauder’s Tom Hogle Right: Sully

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

SYMETRIX TEAM FEEDS THE HUNGRY

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – APRIL 2013: Symetrix is recognized worldwide as one of the leading manufacturers of high-end professional audio solutions. What most audio professionals don’t know is that the company also has an ongoing program in place to provide up to two hundred meals each month for local families in need. The Symetrix team orders supplies, assembles sack lunches, and delivers them to local food banks and shelters. “Sometimes a good meal can make all the difference and we feel it is important to share our good fortune with others,” said Symetrix CEO Paul Roberts.

There is a great team-building aspect to the mission, as well. Symetrix employees gather together from all departments of the company and participate in packing the lunches and having fun interacting. “It’s fun to help others and to get to know the people we work with a little better,” said Mark Ryals, Symetrix marketing coordinator.

This project started more than ten years ago when a Symetrix employee had an extra holiday ham and decided to turn it into sandwiches for the homeless. After making sack lunches as a family project for several years, the Chairman of Symetrix, Dane Butcher, suggested bringing the project into the company. The response from the Symetrix employees was tremendous and ‘many hands make light work’ has made it easy for us to continue with this important work on an even larger scale.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix engineers high-end professional audio solutions, specializing in DSP hardware and software. Symetrix products are distributed worldwide, and designed and manufactured in the U.S. at the Seattle area headquarters. Since 1976, customers have enjoyed the benefits of Symetrix’ independent ownership and management. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

DANLEY LOUDSPEAKERS: A PERMANENT SOLUTION FOR BUFFALO STATE STUDENT UNION

BUFFALO, NEW YORK – APRIL 2013: For over sixty years, the Campbell Student Union has been the central campus venue for meetings, relaxation, and events at Buffalo State, the State University of New York. To keep pace with the shifting needs of its students and to take advantage of new technologies, the university secured funds for a $6 million renovation. The centerpiece of the renovation is a vastly improved social hall, where approximately four hundred people can attend a huge diversity of events, from national touring rock bands to fashion shows and from performing arts to lectures. Even roller skating is on the list! Prior to the renovation, Buffalo State rented a PA for the space whenever it was needed at great expense and with imperfect results. Now, a permanent sound reinforcement system comprised of Danley Sound Labs loudspeakers and subwoofers delivers any kind of program material with fidelity and punch.

AVL Designs of Penfield, New York designed the system. “Several people at the school had their hearts set on a line array solution when we first became involved in the project,” said Seth Waltz, owner and chief designer at AVL Designs. “Of course, I want to provide them with the best sounding, most durable solution available. I felt that a Danley system would be best in that regard, but I also knew it would be financially smarter than a line array. To help persuade them, I sent a Danley loudspeaker for a demo. A few days later, I received their short but telling reply: ‘Yeah, we’re fine. We don’t need a line array.’ Once you hear it, you can’t really argue with Danley’s sound quality.” Operating out of its Rochester, New York office, Ronco Specialized Systems handled the installation.

For concerts, DJs, plays, and other stage-based or high-volume events, Waltz designed a stereo system, with identical clusters flown above either side of the stage. Within each cluster, a Danley SH-60P and a Danley SH-50P merge their coverage patterns to provide an even blanket of sound to the main floor. Additionally, each cluster contains a Danley SH-95P for downfill. All six boxes make use of Danley’s optional self-power. Two Danley DBH-218 subwoofers provide abundant bass from either end of the stage. “We had originally designed the system with four DBH-218s,” said Waltz. “But after hooking up just two, we knew four would be complete overkill. With just two, we could deliver a tremendous amount of clean, amazing bass.”

“Our technicians love working on Danley projects,” said Al Colucci, account manager at Ronco Specialized Systems. “Their loudspeakers and subwoofers sound great, and the people at Danley are easy to work with. The pattern control is excellent and as advertised.” Waltz added, “We started incorporating Danley into our designs about three years ago, after hearing them at InfoComm. They are, hands down, the most natural-sounding vocal boxes we’d ever heard. And not only do they sound great, they require little EQ and translate a wide range of musical styles well.”

For dinners and lectures, Waltz specified nine Danley SH-100s, which are distributed around the room and fire straight down. An eight-channel Ashly ne8250 amplifier powers them (with two SH-100s tied together on one of the channels). “When we were tuning the system, I had someone walk around with a Countryman headset microphone,” said Waltz. “For the first time ever in my experience, we didn’t need any filters. The distributed system sounded even and natural right out of the box.”

An Ashly ne24.24M processor handles all of the input and loudspeaker conditioning. “I put an Ashly processor in almost every job I do,” said Waltz. “In terms of functions per dollar, Ashly can’t be beat. And the audio path is clean and nice sounding, which is of course critical. Here, it handles all of the system equalization and dynamics.” An APB DynaSonics console provides a versatile analog front end, and a collection of Shure and Countryman microphones supply the primary inputs.

Recently, Buffalo State celebrated the completion of the Campbell Student Union renovations with a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by university officials, state lawmakers, faculty, and students. Multiple events, including a live band and a fashion show, demonstrated the new system’s ability to work across styles for maximum effect.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology. www.danleysoundlabs.com

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DiGiCo/Optocore System Streamlines Complex 2013 TED Conference

Leading thinkers and doers from around the globe recently gathered in Long Beach, California, for the annual TED Conference. The topical event, which was held February 25-March 1, 2013, was structured around a theme: “The Young. The Wise. The Undiscovered.”

The fast-paced format of 50+ TED Talks and musical performances presented a dizzying array of talent exploring science, business, the arts and global issues facing our world, and introduced attendees to people who are collectively shaping the future. The production was recorded live, simulcast throughout the Long Beach Performing Arts Center and a satellite location in Palm Springs, and also mixed down for broadcast via webcast to a worldwide audience.

McCune Audio TED Crew: Pete Bender, project manager, McCune; Nick Malgieri, monitors/head of audio (SD10); Erik Sandberg, Front of House mixer/System Tech (2x SD10); Louis Adamo, assistant broadcast mixer/Pro Tools (SD5); Bill Knight, head broadcast mixer (Stage Tec Crescendo fed via MADI from SD5); Matt Chavez, grounds mixer (SD8-24); John Wolcott, Technical stage manager; Chris ("Crimson Avenger") de la Fuente, wireless mic wrangler; David Roth, RF/asst com; Mike Breckenridge, com/asst RF

McCune Audio/Video/Lighting, one of the oldest and largest rental/sound service companies in the country, has been handling TED’s production since the first Conference was held in 1984. McCune is responsible for cameras, live sound/broadcast mixes, amplification, graphics and video projection, and simulcast.

For the 2013 event, McCune’s Nick Malgieri, with cooperation (and console support) from Hi-Tech Audio’s Louis Adamo and freelance FOH engineer Erik Sandberg, undertook the massive task of retooling the audio footprint to handle the ever-growing demands of the multifaceted conference. The decision to go with an all-DiGiCo/Optocore network offered speed, flexibility and a streamlined infrastructure for the elaborate production. Preproduction alone for the event took nearly a week.

The overall audio system was comprised of two SD10s for FOH, an SD10 for monitors, an SD5 that handled live music mixes for broadcast, an SD8-24 for submixing/distribution, four D racks, and an SD-Rack for all I/O, complemented by an extensive, 12-zone Meyer PA and McCauley wedges.

“The TED Conference is the most technically challenging project that I’ve ever had the privilege to be a part of,” says McCune Project Manager Pete Bender, who has been involved since TED3 back in 1992. “It has become the conference by which all others are measured, and every year they raise the expectations on content and quality. There is such a wide variety of content, and so many different audiences and recording needs that need to be managed, that it requires an extremely flexible audio system. The DiGiCo and Optocore system was an enormous improvement over previous years. The flexibility of the networked DiGiCo consoles, as well as the Stage Tec console in the TV truck, gave us the ability to route submixes and outputs to virtually any location on the stage or in the truck. This streamlined the system and allowed the engineers to respond to every last-minute request that we could possibly throw at them. And we threw them a lot. Additionally, the fiber network contributed to savings in time and manpower on both the install and strike days.”

At FOH, a pair of side-by-side DiGiCo SD10s helmed by Erik Sandberg handled the live audio mix—approximately 200 inputs, including 26 channels of wireless, 24 channels of stereo playback devices (primarily video sources), 48 inputs allotted for guest artists and bands as well as a number of submixes for the other consoles.

One SD10 was set up specifically for the corporate production inputs, while the other managed all the live music inputs. A third monitor SD10 console was housed in a rolling road case and wheeled on and offstage to accommodate six ear mixes and a dozen wedge monitor mixes, as well as backstage monitors and production monitors. At FOH, a D Rack handled all FOH inputs and outboard gear inserts, and an additional two D racks at the A2 position onstage handled production inputs such as wireless mics and outputs to the PA system or monitors. An SD-Rack in video world served all of the I/Os, and a fourth D rack was mounted in the thrust staging to manage on-the-fly presenter and artist inputs, mainly for the musical performers.

“As we started doing rehearsals, I was able to cover all my bases with this setup and jump between the two consoles,” says Sandberg, who has handled TED’s FOH for the past eight years. “I had the console split with mics on the left bank and playback devices on the right – with a show this fast-paced and complex, it’s important to keep the structure of the consoles as simple as possible. On the production console, I pretty much ran it from one snapshot and relied instead on presets for each presenter’s EQ. On the music console, every act had its own snapshot. Often bands will show up [at the conference] with their own engineer, and it made life easier to have a separate console so that they could check PFLs, and check channels before they went on. I had it set up like a typical nightclub system, simple and similar to what they’re all accustomed to: kick, snare, hat, rack, floor, right down the line, effects and delay. We had two foldback lines from FOH but a vast majority of onstage monitoring was done backstage by Nick [Malgieri].”

The show consisted of 26 channels of wireless; the first 12 were DPA 4088 headset mics. “TED is known for using the headset mics,” Sandberg explains, “and it’s become part of the look of the TED Talks. The DPAs worked well for that. We also had a series of handheld mics that floated around the audience for Q&As. Onstage, there were five rolling podiums with audio that presenters could plug into with their laptops, plus there was an incoming feed from Palm Springs via Polycom. A lot of playback originated at FOH and I was able to send that as a console send into the network. This made it really easy for everyone to customize their inputs based on what they needed. In the past when we’ve had analog splits, it’s been a challenge because I’d end up with more inputs at FOH and I’d have to do separate snake runs to all the other consoles so they could get what I was getting. It’s one of the reasons we decided to go with the DiGiCo/Optocore network—and it’s made a big difference. It sounds good and it’s easy to use and flexibility is key. Setup time was a fraction of what it used to be.

“The SD10 is a very easy console to navigate. The surface is extremely intuitive, so I was able to organize the desk the way that made sense to me from where I physically sat; I was able to put anything I wanted anywhere, which was invaluable. I was able to put all headset mics on the left side of the console near the Dugan auto mixers, which I inserted on all the channels for panel discussion or multiple mics. They helped to get a clean, lower noise floor. I used a WAVES server on the production console. The plugin was a WNS Noise Suppressor that I inserted into each of my headset mics. It’s a giant, wooden and very reverberant room; the plugin helped knock down reverb. I relied on those noise suppressors quite a bit and they certainly help with intelligibility.”

Backstage, Malgieri found that the Optocore network allowed his monitor console to be mobile and also cut down the amount of gear needed to do the gig. “All risers, band equipment, scenery, grand piano, and whatever else they decided to put onstage went in and out through there, so real estate was a really big deal on stage left,” he explains. “Not running copper snakes this year was huge, and was another benefit of the DiGiCo consoles because I got rid of three split racks and a rat’s nest of cable. We’ve shrunk the footprint from about 50 feet down to half that, to sharing mic pres, no splitters and a lot of fiber—and I was able to leave six to eight large boxes at our warehouse. Also, we used to have this enormous hod [bundle] of cables, and it was a 12-guy, eight-hour ordeal to pull it through the PVC conduit to FOH… This year, with just the two fiber cables and two guys, we were able to save a lot of labor and man-hours. And because I was able to keep the monitor desks tethered down to a loom, it was easy to roll on and offstage for soundchecks. We only had one-and-a-half hours between sessions and, in that time, we had to rehearse four speakers and soundcheck a band in 20 minutes.”

In addition to mixing wedges and in-ear monitors for all the bands and presenters, Malgieri handled Announce from the truck for monitors onstage and off. “I was like the production switchboard for anything around the stage,” he laughs. “Anyone that showed up and needed a temporary speaker, that was me. The stage Announce output from the trucks’ communication system came in and through some creative sidechain-ducking programming I built a Program Interrupt to the backstage monitors, which were time-aligned to the video monitors but fed from the FOH mix, not the broadcast mix. So when anyone was speaking from the truck it cut the monitoring to all the backstage monitors like a TV studio. The flexibility of the console allowed me to do that. I can’t think of any other console that’d allow me to do that in the same way. Another huge thing was that I was able to program a macro to undo that interrupt function without having to get back into my layers and figure out the complicated routing and processing I did. One button press undid it and I didn’t have to think about it on the fly. I just hit the button as an emergency bailout.”
Situated between the venue and the truck, an SD8-24, run by mixer Matt Chavez, with optics on optical loop, served as a distribution hub, routing to lobbies, tents, the plaza, the loge and the balcony. It also broadcast TED’s Walk-in Music at the beginning of each session, and controlled the announcement system that covered the entire venue.

Inside the mobile truck, an SD5 run by Adamo served as an interface between the venue’s audio consoles and truck, running more than 200 I/Os. All channels from the venue were routed over Optocore into the truck and were tied into the main broadcast console via MADI. Additionally, Adamo mixed the musical acts and sent them to the truck, and multitracked to a 128-channel Pro Tools rig via two MADI streams.

A few of the conference highlights were the Kinshasa Orchestre Symphonique (introduced by Ben Affleck), a choir that consisted of 100 members onstage and many more coming in via 32 live Skype feeds, Amanda Palmer and her punk rock ukulele, and Wang Li, the extraordinary master of the Jew’s harp. “The awesome DiGiCo EQ shined during the Jew’s harp performance,” Sandberg recalls, “as he was going for loud volume, which (surprisingly) really put my subs to work. There were lots of small notches under 80hz! The Optocore network was amazing. Because we used very little copper this year, we never had a problem with strange buzzes and hums that have popped up during install and rehearsals in years past. Also, the ability of all five consoles to grab any and all inputs was invaluable. All in all it was great, and DiGiCo shone as expected.”

“The system worked fantastically,” Malgieri adds. “We had no failures or issues; no hums or buzzes. This year was the easiest TED conference so far, due in large part to the DiGiCo/Optocore system. It was also the fastest load-out in the history of the show… by a lot! Every year TED gets a little bit bigger and they request a new technology or infrastructure. Every year, with new changes, we add more gear to our inventory to keep up with the changes, and it’s grown at just the right pace so that we can keep up. This gig ended up raising the expectations for our other clients because they see the benefits of the new gear and systems we’re adopting and implementing. This is the first time I’ve done more than two consoles on an Optocore network so anytime this scenario ever comes up again, it will become a new standard for a large McCune show.”

NEXO GEO S12 Boosts Sound in College Concert Hall

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Built originally as a private high school located in a residential neighborhood of Montreal, the school has transitioned to College Regina Assumpta, recently designing a 705-seat concert hall as part of the revitalization of the college. “An interesting feature of this project is that the concert hall is found inside a courtyard,” states Guy Desmarteaux, main designer and consultant, GO multimedia inc. “This offers the advantage of having the sound of city noise insulated. Specialized in music and dance education, the school now has a powerful tool for development and improvement.”

The Director of the College, Pierre Carle, was on a mission to make the venue a place where the sound quality could compete with the best concert halls. The team of GO professionals listened to the requirements and combining their knowledge, Carle, accompanied by the Director of the Equipment Christophe Bancilhon, and Eric Brunet, responsible for the audio-visual, worked in obtaining the desired result.

Desmarteaux was assisted by Julie Quenneville, architect and scenograph, with Simon Lemieux, Éric Berteau and Pascal Malenfant Tremblay as the consultant team from GO multimédia inc. The architectural firm for the project was Architectes Gagné & Villeneuve. Electrical and structural engineers collaborated with great ease, and always in the interest of the client, to create a professional level concert hall. “From the beginning of the project, the architects and engineers were happy to work with us to achieve a unique space,” says Desmarteaux. “The design was a team effort. The shape, volume, and parameters of the hall were the results of our discussions and proposals.”

“Technologically, it seemed normal and unequivocal to install digital,” notes Desmarteaux. “The scale of the challenge was mainly in the integration of clusters of speakers; quite a challenge to integrate the main sound system in a non-apparent way at higher proscenium.” The main PA consists of four NEXO GEO S1230, eight NEXO GEO S1210, and two RS18 Ray Subs. Three NEXO NXAMP4x4 amplifiers, allowing an active configuration, power the entire system. A set of loudspeakers provides the surround sound reproduction as well as front fills. All signal processing is accomplished using a digital controller with several adjustable settings via a control and management system using a touchpad. Solotech, Montreal, completed the system installation under the supervision of Charles Cadieux and Gilles Côté.

The clusters are installed with a charge differential between the top and bottom speakers. An important physical exercise was necessary in order to integrate them so as to sonically cover the entire audience. NEXO NS-1 software that determines the methods of possible hanging was suggesting that it was an off-standard or impossible installation. Michel Trépanier and his team at Yamaha assisted in facilitating the integration of the clusters. The optimal positioning of the cardioid subwoofers was determined after several tests and measures to match the acoustic phase and frequency response. “The sound image is an important factor not to be neglected,” adds Desmarteaux.

During the concert hall’s construction, interest was raised from internationally known conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Once the project was completed, the venue’s acoustics charmed him, and a three-year agreement was signed between the College and the Montreal Metropolitan Orchestra, conducted by Nézet-Séguin, for the concert hall to be used as their practice space.

For more information on Collège Regina Assumpta, visit http://www.reginaassumpta.qc.ca.

For more information on GO multimedia inc. visit www.gomultimedia.net.

For more information on NEXO products, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Yamaha StageMix 4.0 Now Available

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Initially launched in 2010 the Yamaha M7CL StageMix application for the iPad allowed wireless remote control of M7CL mixing parameters for the first time. The combination of the iPad interface and StageMix concept turned out to be very successful, providing unprecedented monitor setup, freedom and flexibility. Versions for the Yamaha LS9 and CL Series soon followed.

Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. has announced the latest updates available in StageMix Version 4. Version 4 includes new Dynamics Parameter Editing, Output Port Delay Editing, Output Port Levels (Gain/Attenuation), PEQ Copy and Paste, Phantom Power Switching, Mix Send Pre/Post Switching, HPF Slope Parameter (CL V1.5 only), Retina Display Support, and other enhancements.

“StageMix Version 4 will work seamlessly with Yamaha CL, M7CL, and LS9 Series Consoles and bring our end users more convenience and efficiency in setting up for live sound events,” states Kevin Kimmel, Systems Application Engineer, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.

Yamaha StageMix Version 4 is scheduled for release in May of 2013, and will be available from the Apple iTunes Store as a free upgrade. For more information on StageMix Version 4, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Celebrating 125 years of Passion and Performance, and 25 years in the manufacturer of high quality digital audio consoles, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

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