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NEW DANLEY DIRECT FREE MODELING SOFTWARE DELIVERS SPEED, CROSS-PLATFORM PERFORMANCE, SOLID MATH, AND THIRD-PARTY MEASURED DATA

GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA – JULY 2014: Danley Sound Labs, maker of innovative loudspeakers and subwoofers that cleverly sidestep the trade-offs and constraints inherent in conventional designs, has applied that same “outside of the box” thinking to its latest loudspeaker and subwoofer installation design software. Named Danley Direct and available for free from danleysoundlabs.com, the new platform models the direct sound path from user-defined designs involving Danley products in three-dimensional spaces (which can be conveniently imported or modeled via SketchUp). Co-designed by renowned acoustician Doug Jones and Sebastian Rivas Godoy, Danley Direct is notable for its transparent cross-platform performance (Mac or PC), multiple-window flexibility, and tremendous speed. Like everything Danley Sound Labs puts its name on, Danley Direct is built on solid math and third-party measured loudspeaker and subwoofer data.

Danley Direct is heir to the capabilities of Danley’s DDT modeling software, which was one of the only loudspeaker modeling software programs to include subwoofer (i.e. < 100Hz) output. "When we were asked by Mike Hedden, Danley president, to update DDT, Sebastian and I realized that it had fully matured," said Jones. "It would become unwieldy if we tried to build more capability on top of its existing structure. So we decided to start from scratch. We recognized that our new software had to be fast, and it had to let the user create his or her own work environment. It needed a powerful graphics engine that could keep pace with a quick-thinking designer."

Jones and Godoy succeeded. Not only will Danley Direct operate on a Mac or PC with interchangeable files, it will do so with a fluidity that encourages exploration and creativity. The software supports multiple-window operation, and rendered objects can be rotated and otherwise manipulated without requiring re-rendering. "No other loudspeaker modeling software can do that," stated Hedden. Jones added, "With that kind of speed and transparency, Danley Direct is not going to waste anybody's time." Because it uses the ubiquitous SketchUp as its drawing environment, it's easy to create spaces either from scratch or by importing the numerous file types that SketchUp accepts (e.g. .dxf, AutoCAD). Of course, Danley Direct can import Danley DDT files, and, like DDT, Direct training will count toward CTS continuing education credits.

Although not nearly as flashy as its smooth graphics engine or its transparent workflow, Danley Direct's underlying mathematics and the Danley product data that feed into it are honest and correct. That, of course, is of the utmost importance. "Danley has always supported third-party independent measurements," said Jones. "The model you build in Danley Direct will be as close to the reality of the subsequent installation as any reasonable person could expect. This software is not designed to sell Danley products; it is designed to properly model them so that our users will have successful projects. And that is what will sell Danley products."

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

FOR THE LAST TWO YEARS ED CHERNEY HAS USED HIS ATC SCM25As TO MIX EVERYTHING

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – JULY 2014: Ed Cherney needs no padding on his resume. A veteran producer and engineer with 35 years logged in the control room, Cherney has worked with the top talent in the industry, including Iggy Pop, Bob Seger, Bette Midler, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Jann Arden, Jackson Browne, Keb’ Mo, Bob Dylan, and the Rolling Stones, to name just a few. His work has earned him six Grammy nominations and three wins, along with seven TEC nominations and five wins. He is a founding member of Producers and Engineers Wing of The Recording Academy and served as the Governor of the L.A. Chapter of The Recording Academy. Until last year, Cherney was also an avid, collector of studio reference monitors, learning to work around the faults of each model before relegating it to the closet when a newer model came through the door. That cycle ended with the arrival of a pair of ATC SCM25A 3-way nearfield monitors. Cherney now uses his ATC SCM25As for almost everything he does because they’re exciting to listen to and because the work he does on them translates flawlessly on any other pro or consumer system.

“I am always looking for speakers because they’re my eyes in the studio, my window to the world,” said Cherney. “I get a lot of inquiries from younger engineers, asking me if I can recommend a good pair of monitors for five-hundred bucks. I can’t. And it’s crazy that they’ll spend thousands on microphones and outboard gear without first giving themselves the one tool they need to actually hear what they’re doing. It’s like an artist buying expensive paints and then turning out the lights. That said I’ve had a hard time finding the ideal speaker at any price. I guess I’m something of a collector now.”

Cherney first heard a pair of ATC SCM25As at a studio in New York, and he liked what he heard. Shortly thereafter, he was working at a studio in his hometown of Chicago that had no good options for monitors. “I spoke to Brad [Lunde] at TransAudio Group [ATC’s U.S. distributor] and he sent out a pair of ATC SCM50ASLs for us to try. They were spectacular as well! We could turn them up loud, and the low end was defined, the midrange was smooth and silky, and the high end was sweet. The sound was thrilling; it could wash over me and punch me in the chest. These were the first mid-size speakers that could give me the experience of the soffit-mounted loudspeakers that the big studios have.”

He continued, “I’ve been dissatisfied with 2-way speakers in the past. The challenge is always to get the right vocal tone and volume, and it often depends on which side of the crossover the vocal is sitting. Sometimes the same singer can be below the crossover in the verse and above it in the chorus. In the past, I always took my mixes around to different systems – different speakers, my house, my car – to make sure the vocals were sitting in the mix correctly. Now that I have the ATC SCM25As, I rarely have to do that anymore. The vocals sit nicely in the midrange driver, and I’m always within a half dB. Every song. For the first time, I really trust the quality of the mixes in the studio. I don’t have to take them out and check them. I nail it and they translate to the rest of the world. That’s a huge improvement.”

Cherney has already used the ATC SCM25As on a number of projects. He produced, recorded, and mixed the main title for the Disney film Planes called “Nothing Can Stop Me Now,” as well as Robben Ford’s Bringing It Back Home and Eric Burdon’s Till Your River Runs Dry. He mixed Love for Levon on DVD, CD, and broadcast using the SCM25As, and he mixed Road to Forever by Don Felder of the Eagles. Currently, he’s working on a debut album from Athena Perez, a rising country artist from Chicago, and a new Bette Midler album.

In addition to how well his mixes translate on the ATC SCM25As, Cherney is also inspired by their clean, fatigue-free volume. “If I’m recording drums, I like to turn it up!” he said. “If the band’s in the control room, I have to turn it up! When I’m doing the final balances, I may be down around 75dB, but getting there, I want to feel it pop, physically! I want to move air in the room! With the 25s, I can. And I can do it all day long and still be as clear-headed and energized at the end of the day as I was at the beginning. My ATC’s make recording and mixing music much more fun.

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.

www.transaudiogroup.com

(Photo Credit: © 2014 Lynn Fuston)

Grove City Church of the Nazarene Upgrades to New Yamaha Digital System

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Naz Church in Grove City, Ohio main auditorium seats approximately 2,800 people and has a congregation of 3,000. The church recently installed two Yamaha CL Series Digital Audio Consoles (a CL5 at front of house and a CL1 at monitors), eight Rio input/output boxes: two Rio3224-D, two Rio1608-D, two Ri8s, and two Ro8s. The system was purchased through Boynton Pro Audio (Norwich, NY) and installed by church staff and volunteers.

“This was not our first experience with digital consoles,” states Matt Groves, Technical Director at The Naz. “We previously used a Yamaha LS9 at monitors and a Yamaha PM1D at front of house. The purchase of the CL system began when we started looking for a replacement monitor console because our Yamaha LS9 was stolen from the monitor booth. One of our front of house engineers, Doug McLaughlin with Tech Art Productions in Columbus, suggested we purchase a CL Series, and after researching it more, we discovered how functional it would be for us. Our audio engineers are volunteers with previous digital console experience on our LS9 and PM1D, so the only training required was to watch the self-training videos on the Yamaha website. The set up and operation of the CL system was very user-friendly.”

The Church of the Nazarene has both traditional and contemporary services. The traditional service consists of an 80-member choir, a 15-piece orchestra, a rhythm section (with a five- piece drum kit, two digital keyboards, bass, two acoustic guitars, one electric guitar, synth/tracks), and seven main vocalists. The contemporary service consists of a five-piece drum kit, digital keyboard, bass, acoustic guitar, two electric guitars, synth/tracks, and four vocalists.

“Because of the many components each service style presents, we felt it was a good opportunity to start our CL system upgrade,” Groves said. “We decided to purchase a CL1 with a Rio3224-D first to replace the monitor console, and our master plan was to eventually purchase a CL5 for front of house. A couple of weeks after installing the CL1, we began having major issues and failures with our then existing analog wiring and patch bays, so we decided to accelerate the completion of our system and purchased the CL5 along with the seven additional Rio boxes.”

Groves said the features that determined the church selection of the CL Series was the Dante networking and the ability to bypass their old/existing wiring. “The use of the Dante system is so functional for us as a church,” he says. “Since we run two very different style worship services and host many events and concerts throughout the year, having the Dante network gives us the flexibility we need. We also needed to replace the existing wiring and patch bays so being able to run a redundant network with Cat5e cable between the consoles and Rio boxes was a huge cost savings for us. Our system now sounds the cleanest it has ever sounded.”

The Naz also upgraded part of their video system infrastructure using Ross Video’s Carbonite 2M 24 Switcher MultiMedia Edition. The video control room is home to the switcher along with two 60″ Panasonic plasma displays for multi-viewer use with the Carbonite, along with three 24″ LCD displays for preview use. The church staff records to two solid-state hard drives using Blackmagic’s Hyperdeck Studio Pro. Four Mac Pro’s are used for video playback, lyric projection, and live streaming of services, using Livestream as their streaming service provider.

“We currently run five cameras,” Groves notes, “however, these are still our older cameras (three Sony D-30′s and two Canon XH-A1’s). Right now we are meshing our standard definition cameras with the high definition infrastructure, which took some doing, but works great now after some trial and error and many converters.”

With regard to the new Yamaha system, Groves said the system has unbelievable clarity. “It’s amazing when you have the system on and can’t tell it’s on. Before the installation, our system was pretty noisy from the analog wiring and patch bays, but now there is no noise at all. The clarity and depth of sound we’re getting from this system is amazing!”

For more information on The Naz, visit www.thenaz.tv.

For more information on Yamaha CL Digital Audio Consoles, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

SCOTT PETITO PRODUCTIONS ADDS A 1608 CONSOLE “THE BEST PIECE OF GEAR FROM API”

WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK – JULY 2014: Musician, audio engineer, and studio owner Scott Petito has roots in the jazz and acoustic genres that go back to the early 1980s. His studio, Scott Petito Productions, has worked with major acts including James Taylor, Keith Richards, Pete Seeger, Bela Fleck, and Brian Setzer. In an effort to return to his roots in analog recording, Scott consulted Alto Music in Middletown, New York, who directed him toward an API 1608.

“It’s the best piece of gear I have ever used from API,” said Scott. “I have mixed on the Vision and Legacy consoles, as well as several vintage consoles. This has that same sound, but in a compact, simple and reasonable affordable design. It’s new, reliable, and has a great warranty.” The console has 24 channel inputs and 32 slots, providing over 48 reruns from Pro Tools. “It quickly became clear that it’s the only choice for uncompromising analog sound, and a familiar character and layout.”

With a degree from Berklee College of Music and countless hours in the studio, the sound generated by the 1608 is held to a high standard by Scott. “I already can feel and hear the added depth and dimensionality. It makes it easier to get what I want, I use fewer plug-ins, and being a smaller footprint the short signal path is always pristine and clear. It also has great headroom.”

Also among his favorite features and functions, Scott appreciates the Channel Strip and lunchbox implementation. “It lets me keep a lot of flavors on hand. The routing is wonderful. We have everything coming up on the patchbay.”

Scott and his crew wasted no time in getting to know the capabilities of the 1608. “The first session even before everything was wired to the patchbay or furniture was installed, we recorded a new album with Tony Levin, the bassist for Peter Gabriel and King Crimson among others. It’s turning out great! We are now mixing it.”

Next, the new 1608 will be used to mix the new album from Mercury Rev, whose fourth studio album Deserters Song was voted as one of the top twenty most influential albums of the last twenty years by Mojo Magazine. Scott will also use the new console to mix a new album of his own.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

Reach Communications Adds NEXO STM Line Array To Arsenal

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Reach Communications of Minneapolis, MN has added a new NEXO STM line array to its already impressive stable of NEXO boxes. “We researched NEXO, L’Acoustics, d&b and others for boxes having a high 145+db peak output per box, to use as a large format line array for our bigger shows, states Dan Brown, Event Services Manager, at Reach. Having had a long history with NEXO and owning 130+ boxes in house before this purchase, we felt with our current inventory and amazing support from NEXO, this was the obvious option.” With the addition of the STM, Reach now owns 192 NEXO boxes, and 34 NXAmp 4×4 and 4 NXAmp 4×1 amplifiers.

So far, the NEXO STM rig has been used on Unite – NDOP 2014 and the KTIS Joyful Noise Family Festival 2014. NDOP included Hillsong United and a local Unite house band. KTIS Joyful Noise acts included Lincoln Brewster, Mercy Me, Tenth Ave North, Steven Curtis Chapman, Audio Adrenaline, Mandisa, and Hawk Nelson.

“The output and sound quality is incredible and very accurate, says Brown. We have had engineers comment that the STM rig has headroom for days and I barely had to do anything to the EQ! We wanted a system that would give engineers a clean canvas to mix on and headroom to handle the largest venues, and STM provides that.”

For NDOP 2014, the NEXO layout consisted of 12 STM M46 boxes and 12 B112 bass per side, 8 GEO S12s per side for outfill and 9 GEO S12s per side for rear fill. 8 STM S118 subs were used left and right with 8 RS18 spread across the center, and 8 PS10-R2s provided front fill. For Joyful Noise, the NEXO layout consisted of 12 STM M46 boxes and B112 bass per side, 12 GEO S12s HL used for outfill, 5 GEO S12s HR for outfill, 16 GEO S12 used for delays – 8 left and 8 right, 16 NEXO STM S118 subs – 8 per side in Cardioid configuration, 18 RS18 ray subs spread across the center in stacks of 3, and 8 PS10-R2 for front fill. The monitor rig for Joyful Noise included 10 PS15-R2 wedges, 2 PS15-R2 and 2 RS18s for side fills, and 2 RS15 used for drum subs. 14 NEXO NUAR racks powered the system.

“Reach Communications rig was my first experience with the NEXO STM, and it was incredible! states Lee Fields, front of house engineer for Lincoln Brewster. The horsepower of this PA is remarkable. From the second I started mixing until the last note, I was blown away by the punch of the LF and smoothness of the HF. This is Seriously the muscle-car of PA’s.”

For Unite NDOP, Reach provided two Yamaha CL5 digital audio consoles, one at front of house and one for monitors and a PM5D-RH for the house band monitors. A Yamaha CL5 was used at FOH and PM5D-RH at monitors for Joyful Noise. Reach also used the new Yamaha QL1 digital audio console for playback and announcements.

Additional audio gear supplied by Reach included Sennheiser 2000 IEM, Shure UHF-R, Shure, Sennheiser, Beyer, AT mics and Radial, Countryman DI’s. Lighting included Vari-Lite VL3000 spot, VL3500 spot, Martin MAC Aura, MAC 101 – Atomic 3000, ChromaQ colorforce 48, Chauvet 230SR Beam, GrandMA2 light. Video consisted of Hitachi HD1000 camera, Ross Carbonite 2ME switcher, Ross Router, AJA KiPro recorders.

For more information on Reach Communications, visit www.reachcomm.net.

For more information on the NEXO STM line array, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

Corporate A/V Company Adds Yamaha QL1 For Fortune 100 Clients

BUENA PARK, Calif.—Sardis Media of Grayslake, Illinois recently took delivery of a new Yamaha QL1 Series Digital Audio Console for use on their corporate A/V projects. For over 30 years, Sardis Media has produced videos, meetings, and special events for Fortune 100 corporations, non-profits, and A-list associations. Clients include Advisors Excel, Motorola Solutions, Baxter, MorphoTrak, RustOleum, & RZIM. The company purchased its QL1 from Reach Communications of Brooklyn Park, Minnesota.

Sardis, who also owns a Yamaha M7CL Digital Audio Console, will use the new QL1 on the road as the primary audio console for smaller corporate events that require large event features. “We needed a console that had a lot of power and features but in a much smaller footprint for front of house for our production truck, says company spokesperson Nate Aguilar. Clients are always happy when we save space at FOH so they can fit more attendees in the room. As operators, we love that we don’t have to sacrifice quality when going to a small console like the QL1.”

Aguilar said that being in the corporate events business they are always dealing with more than a few Lavaliere microphones open at one time on stage, and the built-in Dugan auto mixer feature of the QL1 helps manage levels tremendously.

“We knew we wanted a touch screen for quick adjustments and graphic feedback on changes being made, says Aguilar. Most of us on staff at Sardis have a background in graphics or video, so being able to actually see what the console is outputting is important. Also, the built-in Dante network gives us the flexibility to add channels and outputs when needed in small increments, and having the ability to record every input separately is vital.”

Since Sardis already owns an M7CL and loves the operation, Aguilar notes, “it was a no brainer to add the Yamaha QL1 with its minimal learning curve to our inventory.”

For more information on Sardis Media, visit www.sardismedia.com.

For more information on Reach Communications, visit www.reachcomm.net.

For more information on the new Yamaha QL Series Digital Audio Consoles,
visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

PLATINUM MIX ENGINEER ERIC RACY DEPENDS ON METRIC HALO PLUG-INS IN THE STUDIO AND ON THE ROAD WITH KATY PERRY

SAFETY HARBOR, FLORIDA: Eric Racy made his entrance into the world of high-profile mixing and producing via the underground world of dance music, a pivot that allowed him to leverage skills and perspective honed by the diverse tones and influences of EDM. He has gone on to mix Robin Thicke, Lil’ Wayne, Pharrell, and Busta Rhymes, along with dozens of other big name artists, and a host of indie and underground artists that deserve to have “big” names. His intuitive, yet technically precise mixing on Tyga’s “Faded” helped propel it to Platinum status, and his affable nature and unfailing ability to work magic with all things audio earned him mission-critical playback positions on tours with 2NE1 and, most recently, Katy Perry. He’s also half of boutique analog signal processing manufacturer Black Box Analog Design and thus aware of tone on a level transcending that of most mix engineers. Racy’s faithful reliance on Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip plug-in, which has been present on most channels on every (yes, every) song he has mixed since discovering it four years ago, speaks to ChannelStrip’s unique musicality and usability.

“ChannelStrip is incredible,” Racy stated flatly. “I’ve used it on every single mix since I discovered it. Although I go out of the box for EQ sweetening on a few critical channels, everything else that needs equalization gets Metric Halo’s ChannelStrip. In fact, those critical channels often get ChannelStrip, too.” Racy has an established methodology in which ChannelStrip plays a key role. When he first opens up a new mix, he combs through each channel, carefully listening for unpleasant resonances and low or high frequency content that can be filtered out. He uses ChannelStrip to then notch out the resonances and filter the unnecessary extremes.

“I’ve tried this with a million plug-ins and outboard EQs,” he said, “but nothing is as effective as Metric Halo ChannelStrip. It doesn’t mangle the audio around the notch or filter, and it doesn’t make it sound like there’s a hole in the frequency range. It gets rid of the annoying frequencies and content, and it does it transparently.” For vocals, Racy often automates the notch frequency to keep the resonance from peeking out when the vocalist changes his or her mouth shape. “The results are well worth the effort,” he said. “Nothing else I’ve found can compare with this technique.”

Similarly, Racy claims to obtain results with the keyed gate on ChannelStrip that he cannot get with any other plug-in or hardware. “I love that I can adjust the key on the gate and that those adjustments are so effective,” he said. “I’ve been working on a forthcoming Killbot album, which involves members of Korn, Sluggo, and Tyler Blue making some aggressive rock meets dubstep. As with any live recording, there’s tons of bleed on the live drums (especially the snare and toms), and – as almost always happens with drum kits – any drum or cymbal can accidently trigger any other drum’s gate. It’s a mess that often required hand-editing in the past; no other gate could get it right. But with Metric Halo ChannelStrip, I can effectively key each drum’s gate so that it only opens for its intended target. I know that other gates have that same functionality, but none of them work nearly as well as ChannelStrip.”

Racy has all of the software and hardware tools he could want in his LA-based studio, but he knew he wouldn’t have access to that gear if he took the job building the audio tracks and doing Pro Tools playback on the Katy Perry “Prismatic World Tour.” “I’m a mix engineer first and foremost, and I certainly didn’t want to give that up on the road,” he said. “Metric Halo plug-ins formed one of the essential components of my mobile rig; ChannelStrip of course, but also Metric Halo’s Character plug-in. Given everything they can do, the Metric Halo plug-ins are very efficient and wouldn’t drain DSP resources on my native rig.”

He continued, “The Character plug-in is great. It models different kinds of analog signal paths, and just like real high-end studio hardware, the effect is critical, but also subtle. Placing different Character settings on a few different channels really adds up to something. It was especially useful to have on the road when I didn’t have access to my outboard gear, but I’ve continued to find plenty of uses for it now that I’m back in my studio.” Racy looks forward to dipping into the rest of Metric Halo’s Production Bundle of plug-ins as time in his busy schedule permits.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

SWEDEN’S UNIVERSITY OF ÖREBRO INSTALLS AN API 1608

ÖREBRO, SWEDEN: With 17,000 students, the University of Örebro is one of the fastest growing universities in Sweden. Its school of music, theatre and art provides the growing student body with an array of course subjects, including recording music technology. In its quest to prepare students for moving on to a modern recording studio, the university has commissioned an API 1608 console.

Situated in the heart of Sweden, the university’s proximity to Stockholm, Gothenburg and Oslo offer students a wide range of cities to seek employment after graduation. It is a young, modern and rapidly growing university with an ambitious agenda for the future. The university also offers courses in English and a foreign exchange program, attracting students from across the globe.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

FIREHOUSE 12 UPGRADES TO AN API LEGACY PLUS CONSOLE

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT: Firehouse 12, a recording studio, live music venue, and record label, located in New Haven, Connecticut, recently commissioned a 32-channel Legacy Plus console. The 24-bus, 12 aux, dual-input console replaces the API Legacy that had previously been installed.

In April, a team of API engineers and service technicians accompanied the console to Connecticut, and the team remained on hand for several days to ensure a smooth transition as the console was integrated into the newly-renovated control room.

“Prior to the Legacy Plus, I had an API Legacy installed at Firehouse 12,” shares studio owner Nick Lloyd, who has a Master’s Degree in Music Theory from neighboring Yale University. “I fell in love with the sound of that console, but realized that the flow and layout of the control room would benefit from a smaller footprint board. The 32-input Legacy Plus provides that smaller size, along with significant workflow enhancements over the Legacy.”

Located in the Ninth Square District of New Haven, Firehouse 12 is an integral part of the southern New England music scene. Nick and his crew record music in a variety of styles, but tend to work on improvised music and jazz. The commissioning of the new console is part of a larger renovation and upgrade to accommodate longer-term residential bookings at Firehouse 12. The acoustics in the main recording space remain pristine, and can accommodate anything from a rock band to the most delicate acoustic music. Equipped with its own bar, the venue also hosts live shows with up to seventy-five audience members.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

ASHLY AUDIO PROCESSING AND USER CONTROL STREAMLINES NEW MICHIGAN FUNERAL HOME

HOMER, MICHIGAN: Long established in Michigan, the Craig K. Kempf Funeral Home recently expanded to Homer, Michigan, where it purchased a small funeral home. Kempf immediately brought in contractors to revitalize the existing structure, which itself had originally been a residential house, and ordered an expansion to provide a modestly larger chapel than the existing 30’ x 15’ room. Local A/V firm Crookston Audio designed and installed a new sound reinforcement system for the new chapel and for the remodeled rooms. Based on its simplicity of installation, competitive pricing, and intuitive user interfaces, company president John Crookston specified an Ashly Pema 4125.70 integrated processor & four-channel amplifier together with Ashly RD-8C and WR-2 user controls.

“They originally asked for two zones, one for the new chapel and one for the existing chapel, the lobby, and the fellowship hall combined,” explained Crookston. “They wanted the ability to reinforce a small keyboard, a soloist, audio from DVD or CD, plus, of course, the spoken word from the person officiating the funeral or delivering a eulogy. Those inputs would be reinforced within the new chapel, and they would also be sent to the old chapel and the fellowship hall, which could serve as cry rooms or overflow. We explained that using four zones, one for each room, would give them greater flexibility, with the promise that using the system would be so intuitive that staff would be able to confidently negotiate source selection and volume control with little or no training.”

A two-rack space, four-channel Ashly Pema 4125.70 resides at the heart of the system and delivers 125 watts to each of the four 70-volt systems. The new chapel, which is still a modest 25’ x 35’, has four mic-level inputs, enough for soloists, vocalists, and spoken word. The audio system also takes input from the room’s CD and video sources. A single Community V2-28 two-way loudspeaker provides coverage in the new chapel, whereas Community D5 ceiling speakers provide coverage in the old chapel, the lobby, and the fellowship hall.

User control consists of two complementary controls. First, an Ashly RD-8C remote desktop fader bank allows anyone to sit within the new chapel and mix the input sources in real time. A single cable ties the RD-8C to the Pema 4125.70, which allows the operator to sit anywhere in the new chapel and discretely mix. Second, an Ashly WR-2 resides near the equipment rack and allows staff to send audio from the new chapel to any (or none) of the other rooms.

“As a contractor, I not only have to deliver a great final product, I also have to make money doing it,” Crookston laughed. “Ashly is a great help with that! Ashly equipment is totally reliable. We’ve been using it for years and never had a problem. Moreover, Ashly’s Protea™ signal processing software is common to the entire Ashly line. So my staff can learn Protea, which is quite intuitive, and then install any Ashly product in any size system. There’s no learning curve. As a result, all of our installations are predictable and as easy as they can be, which is the way I like it.”

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 40-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. www.ashly.com

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