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Archive of the Worship Facilities Expo Newslink Category

FSR Releases Product Guide – Holds Prices Steady

Woodland Park, NJ • FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, has released its latest Price Guide featuring dozens of new products offered at extremely attractive price points. The Guide includes the Company’s new and comprehensive series of HDMI products, elegant and secure iPad holders and chargers, and the hottest line-up of poke-though floor boxes available!

“Our economy and our industry are recovering,” said Jan Sandri, president, FSR,” and we want to do our part to help the recovery by holding our prices. The price of everything else seems to be going up and we want to help out by not doing the same.”

FSR’s comprehensive array of AV products has been significantly augmented. Expanded offerings take aim at professional installations requiring HDMI support with the recently launched Digital Video series comprised of high bandwidth HDMI extenders, switchers, scalars and distribution amplifiers. The Company is also supporting the proliferation of tablet use for digital signage applications with an easy-to-install enclosure that provides a graceful housing for iPads, and a PoE to USB charger that offers a power option for the enclosure. A new line of poke-through floor boxes offers solutions for both concrete and fire-rated floors.

The new Price Guide is available in paper, PDF, Excel and eZip formats. To request a copy, contact FSR at (800) 332-3771, or send an email to mailto:sales@fsrinc.com for more information.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

FSR complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and is a woman owned business. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information visit www.fsrinc.com.

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FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com
Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

HARMAN’s Soundcraft Showcases Si Performer US Debut at WFX and Provides Si Compact Consoles for Hands-On Training Sessions

At the Worship Facilities Conference and Expo (WFX) in Atlanta, Vision2 Marketing will be demonstrating the new HARMAN Soundcraft Si Performer console—the US debut of the first and only audio console with integrated DMX functionality—at Booth 658. Soundcraft is also sponsoring the Hands-On Training (HOT) sessions at WFX, which are designed to improve the technical knowledge and skills of the entire tech arts department of any church.

The Si Performer builds upon the successful Si Compact range to which it bears a likeness, providing almost twice as much DSP power and increased functionality, with an input capacity of 80 inputs to mix on all models. The unique integration of a DMX512 port offers core lighting control. The first release of software provides four scene masters (A-D) with associated slave channels on the ALT fader layers, individual color intensities or parameters are set on the slave faders with an overall master level fader, which itself may be assigned to any of the main fader layers for simultaneous access to audio and lighting levels.

For the HOT sessions, Soundcraft is supplying 18 of its Si Compact audio consoles for HOT attendees to work on over the three days of classes. In addition, Katy Templeman-Holmes and Tom Der of Soundcraft will be on hand to assist in the training and to answer any questions about the Si Compact products.

“As the house of worship market continues to grow, so does the importance of providing valuable training to church staff, and much of that responsibility belongs to the manufacturers of the technology,” Templeman-Holmes said. “The WFX HOT sessions will provide the opportunity for house of worship engineers to learn the ins and outs of audio mixing while working on world-class Si Compact digital consoles.”

In addition, the new Soundcraft Si Performer console is ideal for house of worship applications, according to Mick Beisel, CEO of Vision2 Marketing. “Because many churches rely on a single technical operator to control all elements of worship services and events, the Si Performer provides an opportunity to simplify these responsibilities by integrating both audio and lighting control into a single, compact console,” Beisel said. “We are excited to be the first to showcase the Si Performer in the United States and encourage all WFX attendees to experience the console for themselves!”

For more information on Vision2 Marketing, please visit www.vision2marketing.com

HARMAN (www.harman.com) designs, manufactures and markets a wide range of audio and infotainment solutions for the automotive, consumer and professional markets – supported by 15 leading brands, including AKG, Harman Kardon, Infinity, JBL, Lexicon and Mark Levinson. The company is admired by audiophiles across multiple generations and supports leading professional entertainers and the venues where they perform. More than 20 million automobiles on the road today are equipped with HARMAN audio and infotainment systems. HARMAN has a workforce of about 13,400 people across the Americas, Europe and Asia, and reported sales of $4.4 billion for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012.

Classic Church Gets Modern Update

Brigantine, NJ, September 2012….  Like most of New Jersey’s seaside communities, life on this resort island near Atlantic City is affected by the seasons. In the summer months, the sun seekers and beach lovers help to swell the congregation at St. Thomas the Apostle from 1,000 to more than 3,000 – well beyond what their existing sanctuary can handle. As Bobby Harper, VP of Sales at Egg Harbor-based ACIR Professional explains, the church came up with a creative solution.

“It’s an older structure, and it has some history, and they didn’t want to just tear it down and build something bigger,” says Harper. “So they opted to renovate the original building and also build an event center, which could handle the overflow, as well as other functions.”

The idea of connecting the events center to the sanctuary via audio and video was suggested early on, but a complex digital matrix with touch panels was simply not feasible. “We wanted to create a solution for them that would meet their needs without getting into complex and expensive networking,” Harper explains. In the end, a bit of creativity was all it took.

Using the seasonal population shifts to their advantage, the project was carried out in two phases. “The first summer, they used the (just-completed) events center as just that – a multi-purpose events center,” explains Harper. When fall approached, the event center was pressed into service as temporary sanctuary while the original 1920s-era building was then renovated, expanded, and tied in with the events center via audio and video feeds. “This summer they are finally enjoying it as an expansion space.”

The new sanctuary presented some challenging acoustics. “The sanctuary is pretty reflective inside,” says Harper. “They replaced the carpet with granite and marble, which increased the reverberance.” The addition of naves to the left and right of the altar also impacted the room’s acoustics.

“We decided to go with a distributed system,” Harper continues. “We didn’t want to energize the space with a large system, and we wanted clarity and consistency in coverage.”

The room’s audio includes a pair of Community VERIS 28 dual 8-inch systems at left and right of the altar, with another three VERIS 8 single 8-inch loudspeakers along each side. Yamaha 3500 and 5000 amplifiers power the system. “The church has a full praise band, with drummer, bass , keyboard, organ, a couple of violins and flute, and musicality was an important consideration,” says Harper. “We had been looking into the VERIS systems, and it seemed like a perfect fit.”

System drive and processing is covered by Community’s dSPEC™ networked loudspeaker processor. “The dSPEC is a great piece of gear,” says Harper. “We’re hardly pushing the amps – that’s the beauty of it. We use the dSPEC  to calibrate the limiters on the amps for maximum efficiency with the loudspeakers. And it’s very user friendly. I plugged it in, had no training on it, and had it sorted out in less than an hour.”

A Yamaha MG16 console is installed at the sanctuary’s mix position, with a Yamaha MG24 for the choir monitors. Sennheiser mics and wireless systems cover the choir loft, altar and musicians. A Sony PTZ70 camera captures the service and sends the signal via Ethernet to the event center. Space to the left and right of the altar have been converted into naves, each of which are served by a pair of MX10 compact monitors as wedges. “We custom-painted them to match the wall, and mounted them where the wall meets ceiling,” says Harper. “They look fantastic and they sound great.”

Over in the event center, another Yamaha MG16 console covers mix position. Connected pairs between each of the three consoles enables each to receive aux send audio feeds from the others. As Harper observes, “the system is not quite foolproof, but fortunately the church’s technical personnel are savvy enough not to route things into a feedback loop.”  A smaller 5.1 consumer system covers most of the room’s audio needs, and an Eiki LCWB42NA projector gets the Sony PTZ’s video feed to a ceiling-mounted DaLite screen.

As Harper points out, the event center was conceived from the outset as a multi-use venue, with flexibility a key requirement. “We installed audio I/O panels throughout the room, and they can easily configure the system for whatever event they’re holding. They can take the audio and video feed from the sanctuary, or they can host a power point demonstration, or watch a movie, or Monday night football,” he says. “It also made it easy to configure a portable church while the main sanctuary was under construction.”

While A/V interconnectivity is more often the province of contemporary churches, Harper says the implementation of it in this older, more traditional setting was worth it. “There were certainly some challenges in terms of running cable and working out logistics, but the end result is exactly what we wanted.”

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Community Professional Loudspeakers is a manufacturer and supplier of professional audio equipment.  Since 1968, Community has led the pro-audio industry with technological innovations which have become industry standards. Today, Community offers over 150 professional loudspeaker products, including installed loudspeaker systems, weather-resistant outdoor loudspeaker systems, ceiling loudspeakers, high level voice paging systems, and portable entertainment systems.  Visit www.communitypro.com for more information. 

 

SYMETRIX SOLUS 16 AUTOMIXES ST. ANTHONY CLARET CATHOLIC CHURCH

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 2012: The modest sanctuary of St. Anthony Claret Catholic Church in Anaheim, California is of an airy and lovely modernist design. It was at the height of architectural fashion when it was built in the late 1950s and has again come into vogue in the new century. However, its unintelligible sound reinforcement system was hardly state-of-the-art when installed decades ago, and unlike a fine wine, time did not make it sound any better. As the church’s musical ambitions and spoken word requirements grew through the years, Reverend Rudolph Preciado contacted Newport Beach-based 7K Solutions to remedy the antiquated audio. Paul Dexter, owner of 7K Solutions, used an open-architecture Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 processor to create a system with twelve open inputs that could automix itself.

“Reverend Preciado will be retiring soon, and he wanted to do something great for the church before he left,” said Dexter. “The old sound reinforcement system was not performing well. An early-1980s rack of analog processing and amplification that had become ever-more ‘Frankensteined’ through the years drove a ceiling full of eight-inch, full-range loudspeakers.”

When it was constructed, the church used a charming pipe organ as the sole musical source and had only modest spoken word requirements. Today, the pipe organ is joined by a choir and, for some services, by a band that mixes itself on stage. Three microphones cover the choir, and Dexter replaced the band’s old mixer with an Allen & Heath MixWizard. Instead of a boundary mic at the altar, St. Anthony Claret now uses three wireless headset microphones for the priests, one wireless handheld microphone, and four optional podium microphones.

The Symetrix SymNet Solus 16 is an open-architecture, stand-alone unit that provides sixteen mic/line inputs and eight outputs. The routing, logic, and signal processing that Dexter programmed was quite involved and reflected the specific uses and contexts of each input. For instance, the band’s input will not duck for any other input. In contrast, all of the microphones will duck in response to the headset microphones. Dexter used Symetrix’ time-tested auto-gain algorithm on all of the microphones to ensure that individuals with both quiet and loud speaking voices receive ideal reinforcement.

“I started using Symetrix processing several years ago,” said Dexter. “I’m not the sort of person who’s into taking classes and certifications, so I appreciate how really intuitive SymNet Designer is. But things always come up, and I can call the Symetrix support staff any time and speak with someone who is knowledgeable and interested. My question gets answered and I move on. The SymNet Solus 16 was the perfect solution at St. Anthony Claret because I knew sixteen inputs would be ample and eight outputs was all that were needed. The open-architecture programming would allow me to customize the system for the very particular needs of this church.”

In addition to some clever processing inside the SymNet Solus 16, Dexter corrected the intelligibility problem with a generous helping of acoustical treatment and a single, nearly-point source loudspeaker cluster. “The walls, ceiling, floor, and pews are all quite reflective,” he said. “It was originally meant to amplify the pipe organ.” Dexter placed absorptive panels on the ceiling, sidewalls, and back wall, taking care to match colors so that the aesthetic of the church wouldn’t be compromised. He placed several panels on the ceiling near the central loudspeaker cluster so as to minimize intelligibility-degrading early reflections. The loudspeakers are Fulcrum Acoustic DX1265s, powered by Powersoft amplifiers.

Just a single Symetrix ARC-2e wall panel remote provides all of the user control for the system. Dexter fixed the sanctuary’s output volume and then provided ten steps of volume control for wireless microphones (as a group), the podium microphones (as a group), the choir microphones (as a group), and the band’s on-stage mixer. Additional menu pages provide output volume for the choir monitor (which contains all content except the choir mics) and the cry room. Behind the scenes, the SymNet Solus 16 provides additional zone control for the foyer and each main loudspeaker. Zoning out the loudspeaker cluster allowed Dexter to shade and tune each element to deliver even coverage from the front seat to the back wall.

“Taken together, the system is very effective,” said Dexter. “It sounds great, and they don’t need an audio tech on hand. Reverend Preciado tested the system with us, and he walked all around the room, overjoyed by how clear everything sounded. And it’s so easy to use that we never had to provide a formal training session. The Reverend just pushed some buttons on the ARC-2e, and he understood exactly how it works.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX
Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

IC Live Turns The Tables For Oslo’s Modern Church

Oslo, Norway, September 2012… The Sofiemyr church in Oslo is a striking modern building, with bare brick walls, a tiled floor and wooden ceiling. Light pours in from a huge stained glass window and other windows in the corners.

The audio solution, supplied by Benum A/S, is equally striking, with a pair of inverted IC Live arrays, flown from the ceiling alongside the matching subwoofers, above a small performance stage. The technique has been used before – England’s Stage Audio Services was possibly first to experiment with it, flying a pair of IC Live arrays upside down at trim height for a standup comedy tour of UK theatres, which allowed the beams to be angled at the ground floor audience as well as the balconies. But this is almost certainly the world’s first permanent installation to use the configuration, which has many benefits in a tall space.

Geir Kristoffersen, manager of the consulting department of COWI for Acoustics and Electro Acoustics, Sound and Vision, who designed the system for the church and frequently mixes it, explains: “This room is a cube, essentially, 16 by 16 metres with a height of about 12 metres, so it’s very interesting acoustically. But it’s turned 90 degrees so that you get some angles towards the speakers.” Slots in the ceiling provide low frequency absorption.

Although on the face of it a highly reverberant space, the actual reverb time is just 1.7 seconds with a very well controlled low end. “But still, 1.7 seconds is significant,” he points out. However, the bare brick walls are an inevitable challenge in view of their capability to deliver slapback echo to the stage.

The church is also equipped with a pipe organ, which is quite frequently played together with a band and a grand piano, as well as a movable pulpit, which is taken out during modern-style worship services.

“The loudspeaker system is flown in the form of a pair of Renkus-Heinz IC Lives,” says Kristoffersen. “We’re very happy with the sound of it. In fact, I’ve never worked with a system that’s so easy and quick to get good sound out of,” he says.

“It works exceptionally well for this kind and size of room and with such a wide variety of music. Together with the choir, we often have a worship team of eight people singing with their vocal microphones. Last Sunday, for example, the choir was seated directly in front of the loudspeakers and I had my measurement system at the desk and I was pumping 90db A weighted but flat out it was giving 101dB. Yet there was no issue with feedback,” he continues.”With these digitally steerable arrays we get tightly controlled beams, which allow us to deflect the sound away from these noisy brick walls,” he explains, adding, “While there is some reverberation, of course, if you shoot straight into these walls then you’d have a big problem with slapback.”

The system is configured with two beams from each IC Live, one pair aimed at the front part of the congregation, the others at the rear. The result, says Kristoffersen, “is that the sound is completely uniform wherever you are standing or sitting.”

“What I like the most about this system – and I’ve worked with good systems all my life – is that because it’s a true line array and not a banana hang it creates a cylindrical wave, which means that it doesn’t excite the room as much as a traditional three-box system, which would have been our obvious alternative,” he says, and adds, “Another thing is that, with a choir, the choir bench is high, which means the microphones are right in front of the loudspeakers, yet we have never had any feedback problems. Because it’s so even sounding across the frequency spectrum you don’t get response spikes which then become the problem, especially with the choir-mic scenario.”

Tuning is performed using both RHAON and in an Allen & Heath IDR8 DSP processor with an Allen & Heath T112 control surface, allowing it to be controlled from two different places.

A small delay system provides extra coverage into a small annexe at the rear and in the side halls, using CFX-61R cabinets, again controlled over RHAON and CobraNet. These are matched with six CF-121M cabinets for monitors, which can also be deployed as a portable PA in the larger side room of the church, or outside during the summer.

He continues, “It’s also very good for the monitoring because despite it being so loud up there it doesn’t feedback even when it’s rock’n'roll loud. Also,” he adds, “we work a lot with the grand piano and, for me, a grand piano has to sound good. If the grand piano doesn’t sound good then it’s nearly worse than having the drum kit not sounding right, but even when we’re pushing rock’n'roll levels and there’s a monitor there next to it, if you do push it to feedback it’s not high-end feedback but a just rumble, which tells you that the total room is just playing too loud. It’s very impressive and we’re extremely happy.”

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Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

 

StudioLive Helps Florida Church into the Digital Age

Sanford, FL, September 2012… Josh Walker is a self-described “professional creative.” From music and recording to live sound and systems integration, Walker works with bands, musicians, and organizations, helping to create a powerful musical and visual experience.

In addition to his regular duties as Creative Arts Director at Morgantown, West Virginia’s, Catalyst Church, Walker is an AV consultant to churches and institutions across the US, helping their users to design and get the most from their systems. As he puts it, “I love technology, and I love simplicity.”

Walker recently talked about an interesting project at Safe Harbor Christian Church in the Orlando suburb of Sanford, Florida. The church’s 250-seat sanctuary was plagued by a number of challenges, both environmental and operational. “The room itself is actually pretty good, other than a rather high ceiling,” he observes. “But they had some rather outdated and ineffective technology, and that’s where we started.”

The sanctuary’s analog console lacked many of the features the church needed. “Even at its best, they could only get two monitor mixes out of it,” Walker explains. And the aging mixer had apparently seen better days, with several channels either partially or fully inoperable.

The multi-channel snake fared little better. “The snake had been spliced with what looked like residential copper wiring to extend it to the 250 feet needed to reach the desk,” says Walker. “It was pretty down and dirty and just a bit dangerous.”

Walker recommended the PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2 digital console. “I had mixed live shows on the PreSonus on a couple of occasions and was pretty impressed,” he says. “For its size and price, it’s surprisingly powerful. It’s ideal for small to mid-sized churches.” Apparently it wasn’t hard to convince the church either. “They had been researching consoles, and the StudioLive was at the top of their list.”

Not surprisingly, the butchered snake was a goner. “There was no way to salvage it, so we installed a new 200-foot multicore,” says Walker. “Between the snake and the StudioLive, we immediately raised their available monitor mixes from two to five. The snake enabled us to go up to eight, and the console allowed for ten.”

Another challenge plaguing the church was a lack of proper training. “Outside of their core team, it’s largely a volunteer crew,” Walker explains. “One of the guys had run the sound at a larger venue for about 20 years, so he knew audio but he didn’t know digital. The rest of them were folks who wanted to help out, but had no audio experience.”

Walker says the StudioLive made training the crew an easy undertaking. “We had to go through everything, from how to use a digital console down to the basics of how to mix, use EQ, compression, and so on. I think we did a total of around six hours of hands-on training, and when I left I was fully confident that they had a good grasp of things,” he says. “The console makes it so easy. The Fat Channel is so intuitive – all the information is right in front of you. There are no layers of menus. In fact, there’s almost nothing you can’t get to within two button presses or two turns of a knob.”

He points to the StudioLive’s expandability as another asset. “If their production grows twofold in the next couple of years, they can get another one and connect them via FireWire.”

“To be able to give them a console that takes up less space and does more than two of their old consoles is just a no-brainer,” he concludes.

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Founded in 1995, PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc., is a leading designer and manufacturer of audio-recording software, hardware, and related accessories. PreSonus software, microphone preamps, signal processors, digital audio interfaces, mixers, control surfaces and other products are used worldwide for recording, sound reinforcement, broadcast, sound design, and Internet audio.

API APPOINTS SOURCE DISTRIBUTION NEW UK DISTRIBUTOR

Pictured from left to right: Dan Zimbelman, API Director of Sales; Steve Angel, Source/HHB Director of Sales; Ian Jones, Source/HHB Managing Director; and Gordon Smart, API Managing Director posing behind the vintage API Legacy console at British Grove Studios, owned by Mark Knopfler.

JESSUP, MARYLAND – AUGUST 2012: API, manufacturer of professional analog recording consoles and outboard processors, has appointed London-based powerhouse Source Distribution as exclusive distributor for its full range of products throughout the United Kingdom. Source, a division of HHB Communications, brings over 35 years of industry experience to the partnership, as well as a client list that includes the BBC, Sky, CNN, and Abbey Road, among others. The company is well known for serving its clients not only with great products and equipment, but also with comprehensive educational and technical support. The addition of API signal processing modules and consoles significantly extends the breadth and depth of high-end analog processing available to Source and HHB clientele.

“We’re very pleased to be working with the great people at Source/HHB,” said Dan Zimbelman, director of sales at API. “HHB Communications has been in this business for almost as long as API has, and the staff’s consistent professionalism and unfailing habit of exceeding expectations has earned HHB a large and loyal client base throughout the UK. It’s a great time for API to broaden our reach throughout the UK market.

“API is a legend in the world of professional recording, and we’re proud to sell its punchy, ‘American’ analog sound on our side of the pond,” said Ian Jones, owner and managing director at HHB Communications. “From its modular lunchbox series to its dedicated rack mount gear, and from its small-frame 1608 to its large-frame Legacy and Vision consoles, API occupies a unique niche in the industry. After all, every audio professional knows what is meant by the phrase, ‘the API sound.’ Is there any other company with this type of name recognition or reputation in this industry? Just watch us run with API.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.)
Established more than 40 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series and 1608 recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

SYMETRIX PROMOTES BROOKE MACOMBER TO DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – AUGUST 2012: Symetrix announces that its former Director of Business Development, Brooke Macomber, is now Director of Marketing. In her new role, Macomber will manage the planning and execution of Symetrix’ worldwide promotional efforts so as to support the company’s continued growth. Macomber possesses nearly a decade of experience in the professional audio industry, familiarity with Symetrix’ operations, and both an MBA and a Global Business Certificate from the University of Washington, which together put her in an excellent position to increase Symetrix’ market share in the United States and abroad.

“Brooke came to Symetrix in 2006 to serve as our Sales and Marketing Manager,” said Paul Roberts, who recently vacated the Vice President of Sales and Marketing position to assume the responsibility of CEO for Symetrix. “After that, she rose to become Director of Business Development, and I’m very pleased that she will now serve as our Director of Marketing. Brooke’s personality and expertise will undoubtedly guide Symetrix to ever greater success.” Macomber will report directly to Roberts. Her expanded department is will be responsible for all areas of marketing, advertising, PR, communications, and business development.

“I am eager to take on the Director of Marketing role,” said Macomber. “Symetrix’ strength is founded on an unwavering commitment to empower customers with robust, affordable, forward-thinking professional audio DSP hardware and software. We listen to what audio professionals want, we deliver brilliant products that answer those calls, and we stand behind our work. The coming year will undoubtedly be one of our biggest. Our R&D calendar is packed with amazing new product releases, and with the recent introductions of SymNet Edge and SymNet Radius, there is a lot for me and my team to promote. I look forward to working with the extremely talented individuals in the Symetrix sales and marketing department, and I look forward to supporting our customers and end users in every way possible through honest and engaging marketing and communications.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

Classic Church Gets Modern Update

Brigantine, NJ, August 2012….  Like most of New Jersey’s seaside communities, life on this resort island near Atlantic City is affected by the seasons. In the summer months, the sun seekers and beach lovers help to swell the congregation at St. Thomas the Apostle from 1,000 to more than 3,000 – well beyond what their existing sanctuary can handle. As Bobby Harper, VP of Sales at Egg Harbor-based ACIR Professional explains, the church came up with a creative solution.

“It’s an older structure, and it has some history, and they didn’t want to just tear it down and build something bigger,” says Harper. “So they opted to renovate the original building and also build an event center, which could handle the overflow, as well as other functions.”

The idea of connecting the events center to the sanctuary via audio and video was suggested early on, but a complex digital matrix with touch panels was simply not feasible. “We wanted to create a solution for them that would meet their needs without getting into complex and expensive networking,” Harper explains. In the end, a bit of creativity was all it took.

Using the seasonal population shifts to their advantage, the project was carried out in two phases. “The first summer, they used the (just-completed) events center as just that – a multi-purpose events center,” explains Harper. When fall approached, the event center was pressed into service as temporary sanctuary while the original 1920s-era building was then renovated, expanded, and tied in with the events center via audio and video feeds. “This summer they are finally enjoying it as an expansion space.”

The new sanctuary presented some challenging acoustics. “The sanctuary is pretty reflective inside,” says Harper. “They replaced the carpet with granite and marble, which increased the reverberance.” The addition of naves to the left and right of the altar also impacted the room’s acoustics.

“We decided to go with a distributed system,” Harper continues. “We didn’t want to energize the space with a large system, and we wanted clarity and consistency in coverage.”

The room’s audio includes a pair of Community VERIS 28 dual 8-inch systems at left and right of the altar, with another three VERIS 8 single 8-inch loudspeakers along each side. Yamaha 3500 and 5000 amplifiers power the system. “The church has a full praise band, with drummer, bass , keyboard, organ, a couple of violins and flute, and musicality was an important consideration,” says Harper. “We had been looking into the VERIS systems, and it seemed like a perfect fit.”

System drive and processing is covered by Community’s dSPEC™ networked loudspeaker processor. “The dSPEC is a great piece of gear,” says Harper. “We’re hardly pushing the amps – that’s the beauty of it. We use the dSPEC  to calibrate the limiters on the amps for maximum efficiency with the loudspeakers. And it’s very user friendly. I plugged it in, had no training on it, and had it sorted out in less than an hour.”

Space to the left and right of the altar have been converted into naves, each of which are served by a pair of MX10 compact monitors as wedges. “We custom-painted them to match the wall, and mounted them where the wall meets ceiling,” says Harper. “They look fantastic and they sound great.”

A Yamaha MG16 console is installed at the sanctuary’s mix position, with a Yamaha MG24 for the choir monitors. Sennheiser mics and wireless systems cover the choir loft, altar and musicians. A Sony PTZ70 camera captures the service and sends the signal via Ethernet to the event center.

Over in the event center, another Yamaha MG16 console covers mix position. Connected pairs between each of the three consoles enables each to receive aux send audio feeds from the others. As Harper observes, “the system is not quite foolproof, but fortunately the church’s technical personnel are savvy enough not to route things into a feedback loop.”  A smaller 5.1 consumer system covers most of the room’s audio needs, and an Eiki LCWB42NA projector gets the Sony PTZ’s video feed to a ceiling-mounted DaLite screen.

As Harper points out, the event center was conceived from the outset as a multi-use venue, with flexibility a key requirement. “We installed audio I/O panels throughout the room, and they can easily configure the system for whatever event they’re holding. They can take the audio and video feed from the sanctuary, or they can host a power point demonstration, or watch a movie, or Monday night football,” he says. “It also made it easy to configure a portable church while the main sanctuary was under construction.”

While A/V interconnectivity is more often the province of contemporary churches, Harper says the implementation of it in this older, more traditional setting was worth it. “There were certainly some challenges in terms of running cable and working out logistics, but the end result is exactly what we wanted.”

###

 

Community Professional Loudspeakers is a manufacturer and supplier of professional audio equipment.  Since 1968, Community has led the pro-audio industry with technological innovations which have become industry standards. Today, Community offers over 150 professional loudspeaker products, including installed loudspeaker systems, weather-resistant outdoor loudspeaker systems, ceiling loudspeakers, high level voice paging systems, and portable entertainment systems.  Visit www.communitypro.com for more information. 

SYMETRIX EXPANDS SYMNET AUDIO DSP WITH RADIUS 12×8

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – AUGUST 2012: Symetrix announces the Radius 12×8, a Dante™-networkable, fixed I/O, open-architecture digital signal processor expanding the innovative SymNet platform.

Radius may be installed as a standalone processor or used in conjunction with SymNet Edge or third party Dante(tm) network-enabled devices to achieve the scalability and flexibility needed to meet the specifications of the simplest to the most complex installations.

“The Radius 12×8 is an extremely powerful installed sound DSP making use of one of the industry’s most popular input/output form factors – 12×8,” said Paul Roberts, CEO. “In response to integrator feedback, the SymNet Radius 12×8 includes ARC-WEB, our simple, yet powerful, browser-based user-control technology, compatible with Apple and Android smartphones and tablets.”

Audinate’s award-winning Dante technology is leading the way networks are connected by transporting high-quality media over standard IT networks. Dante delivers a no-hassle, self-configuring, true plug-and-play digital audio network that uses standard Internet Protocols.

Lee Ellison, Audinate’s CEO remarks “Symetrix has done their research and is seizing the opportunity with the launch of the Radius 12×8, their second Dante-enabled product to hit the market this year. ” Ellison adds, “With the new Radius, customers will be able to easily connect to the many other Dante-enabled products now available which in turn offers a broader networked solution for everyone.”

KEY PRODUCT BENEFITS AND FEATURES
• Plug-and-play networking enables multiple Radius and Edge units to function as building blocks in a scalable system design, from one DSP to many.
• Easy transition to Radius 12×8 with advanced training available online 24/7 and Symetrix technical support staff available for design assistance.
• Twelve mic/line inputs, eight line outputs.
• Configure with SymNet Composer software with over 600 DSP modules.
• Internal gigabit and 10/100 switches eliminate the need for third-party switches in most systems.
• Network audio expansion using Dante protocol over standard IT networks. 64 transmit and 64 receive channels. Ultra low latency.
• User control: Symetrix ARC wall panels, ARC-WEB web app, SymNet SymVue, third-party touch screens.

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

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