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Archive of the Worship Facilities Expo Newslink Category

Iconyx Helps St. Matthews Get the Message Across

Pacific Palisades, CA, January 2012….Nestled in the rolling canyons of Pacific Palisades, Saint Matthew’s Episcopal Church is one of the area’s oldest and largest parishes. The sprawling 42-acre grounds are home to multiple buildings including St. Matthew’s Day School and Pre-School, as well as recreational facilities and the highly acclaimed Moore Ruble Yudell-designed sanctuary.

While wonderful to behold, the sanctuary’s stunning architecture, with its soaring ceilings and exquisite glass work, has long suffered from problematic acoustics. As Daniel Bae, project manager for Sierra Madre-based Platt Design Group, explains, the room’s previous systems did little to alleviate issues of intelligibility and poor sound distribution. “A lot of the complaints about the previous systems had to do with speech intelligibility and coverage,” says Bae. “The room isn’t very deep, but it is very wide, so time alignment was a major problem.”

“When the sanctuary was first built, we had two speakers on the ceiling,” says Jeremias Mendez, the church’s Plant Manager for more than 30 years. “One side of the room was completely dead – people were only able to hear the sermon from a few seats.”

“It’s my understanding that the sanctuary’s architecture was designed to make the most of the choir and organ, and not the sermons,” observes parishioner Jim Dutka, the project leader behind the drive to upgrade the church’s audio system.

Dutka and company contacted Platt Design Group, who recommended a pair of Renkus-Heinz Iconyx IC-Live steerable arrays, one on either side of the proscenium. “The IC-Live enabled us to steer the sound where it needed to go – away from the walls and reflective surfaces and into the seats.”

Not surprisingly, aesthetics was also a major concern. “Renkus-Heinz provided custom paint for the IC-Live cabinets, helping them to blend almost invisibly into the sanctuary’s beautiful architecture,” says Bae.

“We have a number of older parishioners who have traditionally relied on hearing-assisted technology systems every week,” says Dutka. “Since we’ve installed the new system, many of them have come to us and informed us that they no longer need the assisted listening.”

“Platt Designs and Renkus-Heinz have provided us with a tremendous improvement,” agrees Mendez.

“I’m proud to say we now have one of the finest audio systems in the area,” Dutka concludes.

 

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SYMETRIX OFFERS TECHNICAL SUPPORT AND TRAINING IN SPANISH

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – JANUARY 2012: Symetrix announces that it is now offering technical support and training services in Spanish. This new addition to the company’s dedication to customer service is being handled by Technical Support Specialist, Michael Perry, who recently joined the Symetrix support team. Perry is fluent in both English and Spanish will be handling this service. Perry’s phone number is +1 (425) 778-7728 x234, and Spanish technical support emails can be directed to espanol@symetrix.co

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1 (425) 778-7728.

FSR Builds a Bigger (Ceiling) Box

Woodland Park, NJ • FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, has announced the launch of a new ceiling box with a deeper design developed to accommodate applications requiring more internal equipment than the CB-12 and CB-22 models.

“The CB-224 is the largest unit in our popular CB Ceiling enclosure series,” commented Jan Sandri, FSR’s president. “Its capacity to support 50 pounds for a projector, and 12 pounds on each shelf makes it ideal for any venue requiring a robust ceiling mount.”

The unit is a perfect fit for conference centers, schools, meeting and training facilities, airports and museums. Its advanced deep box design has a pull-down 4 RU cage with gas-spring assisted ball-bearing slide. 2 RU of angle-adjustable rack-mounting surfaces on either end of the cage facilitate mounting and visibility of 1RU/2RU patch panels. 1-3/8” of clear space on both sides allows for wire bundles to traverse parallel to the cage after installation. Each side of the box has an edge-protected bundled cable inlet cavity, filled with flame retardant foam seal. The interior of the CB-224 is complete with 5 internal outlets, 1 external outlet, and a fan.

The CB-224 ceiling box is available in 4 versions: with or without a pole-mount for a projector, and both with or without “smart” electronics. The Smart Module brings Green Energy savings to the Ceiling Box by turning power on and off to non-critical equipment based on the current being drawn by the projector. In effect, when the projector is shut down, the non-critical devices in the ceiling box are power off as well, and when the projector is powered on, so are the other devices. This reduces the amount of power being consumed by the room when it is not in use.

The CB-224 is ETL listed and has approvals for safety (UL 60950-1) and visible smoke (UL-2043). Units are currently shipping.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

All FSR products are designed and manufactured in its Woodland Park, NJ facility. The company is an Energy Star Partner and complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to demonstrate its deep commitment to preserving the planet. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information: www.fsrinc.com.

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FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

FSR To Showcase Affordable Fingertip Room Control System At ISE 2012

ISE Stand #7P215

Woodland Park, NJ (1 December 2011) — FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, will be showcasing their Flex-LT self-contained control system at ISE 2012. The award-winning, affordable system will be demonstrated in FSR’s Stand #7P215 beside the Company’s wide variety of table, wall, and floor boxes, Twister Pro transmission systems, and expanded IPS line of instant connectivity.

FSR’s FLEX-LT room control system offers a vast number of features, ability to operate a full-range of AV equipment with simple fingertip operation, and an appealing price point. The versatile unit mounts in a wall or sits on a surface to present an operator-friendly color touch screen. Non-technical users can operate the system effortlessly, control the various sources, change the volume, turn lights on and off, raise or lower the shades or screen, and much more with a simple touch.

The user friendly, easy-to-afford touch screen system is designed to accommodate educational facilities, entertainment, corporate and hospitality venues, and government installations of varying sizes and requirements. The FLEX-LT can control nearly every aspect of a room with a simple touch of a button.

The Flex Configuration Utility features an uncomplicated method to maximize system capabilities. The contractor merely follows drag ‘n drop programming methodology; eliminating the need to learn another programming language. This allows easier updates if system equipment changes.

The FLEX-LT family is available in 4 models to suit the needs of each installation. In addition, FSR offers Flex Remote, a Windows based application that can remotely control a Flex panel, and Flex Manager, a comprehensive Windows application to schedule, monitor and manage all of the Flex panels in an installation.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

All FSR products are designed and manufactured in its Woodland Park, NJ facility. The company is an Energy Star Partner and complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to demonstrate its deep commitment to preserving the planet. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information: www.fsrinc.com .

FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

FSR To Launch European Version Of Its Successful Table Box At ISE 2012

ISE Stand #7P215

Woodland Park, NJ — FSR, manufacturer of audio and video switching, control products, and connectivity boxes, has announced plans to launch its T6E table box, a European version of its widely successful T6 model at ISE 2012. The unit will be on show alongside a full complement of AV products in Stand #7P215 at the RAI. The table box, FSR’s newest, answers the need for an expandable, elegant unit in a conference room environment.

“We are delighted to debut the T6E, a table box designed specifically for our European customers, at our first ISE exhibition!” exclaimed Jan Sandri, FSR’s president. “The unit has been extremely well received in every region where it’s been introduced, and we’re confident it will exceed expectations in the European market as well.”

The T6E provides easy access to audio/video equipment, computers, telephones or any device requiring electronic connectivity from a conference or boardroom table. The unit features two configurable compartments that can contain Wonpro universal power outlets and either keystone audio, video, control and data connectors, IPS plates or a cable pull option.

The T6E is available with a round or square cover in black, aluminum or brass to match the décor of the room. Both round and square shapes fit in a 152mm round hole making installation extremely simple. Its cover can be closed while in use with cables exiting through the milled openings.

About FSR
FSR, established in 1981, manufactures a wide variety of products for the audio / video, education, hospitality, government, and religious markets, including AV floor, wall, table, and ceiling connectivity boxes, as well as a full line of interfaces, distribution amplifiers, matrix switchers, seamless switchers and CAT-5 solutions.

All FSR products are designed and manufactured in its Woodland Park, NJ facility. The company is an Energy Star Partner and complies with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to demonstrate its deep commitment to preserving the planet. FSR offers live 24/7 technical and sales support throughout the country from expertly trained technicians and sales representatives. For more information: www.fsrinc.com .

FSR Contact: Jan Sandri
973-785-4347 • sales@fsrinc.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener
845-512-8283 • harriet@desertmooncomm.com

ATLANTA’S PERIMETER CHURCH PUTS DANLEY IN THE HANGER

ATLANTA, GEORGIA: Perimeter Church in suburban Atlanta, Georgia does a fantastic job of ministering in a way that connects emotionally and culturally with all members of the church community. Middle and high schoolers attend services in The Hanger, a 1,000-seat sanctuary devoted to the themes that resonate with the unique challenges and aesthetics of young adults. However, in the five long years since its completion, The Hanger has suffered from grossly inadequate sound reinforcement, including poor coverage and anemic bass. To remedy the situation, Perimeter technical director Steve Simmons designed and installed a Danley Sound Labs-based system that now delivers even coverage and enough clean, undistorted bass to “knock the breath out of you,” in Simmons’ words.

“The original system was terrible from day one,” Simmons said. “We had a left-center-right system, but each cluster was comprised of boxes that worked poorly together. If you were in the beam of some components, you got boomy, indistinct low-end. Other components conveyed the high-end, but not with the same coverage pattern. As a result, there were only a few select seats that got anything close to a balanced frequency response. The rest rode complex peaks and valleys of sound pressure and pass band.” In addition, the floor-mounted subs were spaced improperly and thus contributed a floppy, interference-riddled bass response to the existing full range mess.

Danley Sound Labs, headquartered in nearby Gainesville, lent Simmons a few full-range boxes so that he could prove his models. After a bit of tweaking, he settled on left-right coverage delivered by one Danley SH-96 flown wide on each side, with a paired Danley SH-95 turned on its side to provide near-wall fill. “It’s amazing that the old system required numerous units and still failed to cover the room, while Danley managed to do it with basically two boxes,” said Simmons. The center cluster, which is used primarily for spoken word, is comprised of three Danley SH-50 full-range loudspeakers in a tight pack that delivers truly seamless coverage to the entire room.

“The old system used a first-generation DSP that has a well-known problem with a high-frequency oscillation,” said Simmons. “We could hear it if we wore headphones or when the room was empty or if we were concentrating. But when the Danleys came on line, it was immediately apparent… and horrible. It just about drove us from the room. Of course, that’s a testament to the honest and extended high-frequency response of the Danley product, but it also meant we had to get a new DSP stat!” Fortunately, Perimeter’s large campus and system of satellite sites requires a certain amount of gear-on-hand. Simmons replaced the old DSP with a Biamp Audia DSP that he plans to replace when new 2012 models hit the streets. Crown Macro-Tech 5000i amplifiers provide power to the system.

Perimeter’s store of goods helped out a youth conference at The Hanger a few months in advance of the full system renovation. Simmons pulled two Danley TH-115 subwoofers from Perimeter’s standing stock and flew them over the center of the sanctuary. “It was a dramatic improvement,” he said. “We were able to drop the rest of the system by 6dB, but everyone commented that the system sounded louder… and better.” For the full renovation, Simmons added two Danley TH-118s to those boxes for a total of four coupled Danley subwoofers. “It’s very powerful and very even,” he commented. “We now have the percussive, dynamic low end that I had always hoped for.”

The new system is winning Danley adherents. “We have so many services, programs, and events, that we have a crew of technicians,” Simmons explained. “A job candidate spent a couple of weekends mixing in our main sanctuary, which does not have Danley boxes and is quite difficult to mix in. The third week, we asked him to mix in The Hanger. He had never mixed on Danley boxes before, and after the service I got a text from him that said simply, ‘I heart Danley forever.’ When I spoke with him later, he noted that he was able to clearly hear a 1dB EQ boost – the kind of thing that is lost in any other system.” In contrast to the peaks and valleys of the old system, the Danley system is tremendously even. One can walk from wall to wall, and the sound pressure and frequency response is consistent. There are other benefits, too. The Danley clusters, despite their vastly improved performance, are one third the size of the original clusters, and while the old system was constantly cranked, the Danley’s are attenuated by 20dB and still produce enough output to keep the youth jumping in their seats.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology. www.danleysoundlabs.com

Greater Beth-El Temple Renovates with Iconyx IC Live

Omaha, NE – December 2011… The restoration of Omaha’s Greater Beth-El Temple is complete after a June 2008 arson fire set by mischievous neighborhood youths that nearly destroyed the Apostolic Christian church, popular among Omaha’s African-American community. The congregation was forced to relocate while the temple underwent a complete renovation. Left virtually an empty shell after the fire, the building required new floors, a ceiling, a stage, seating, and numerous other necessities including a sound system.

Greater Beth-El services include a full musical ensemble playing contemporary Christian and gospel music. Theatrical performances and concerts are also regular events at the temple. According to John Manhart of Direct Pro Audio LLC, the contractor who designed and installed Greater Beth-El’s new audio system, low profile looks combined with large sound capability were paramount in selecting the new system.

“Greater Beth-El needs a sound system that blends well aesthetically with the temple’s décor but still provides enough output to handle their sound requirements,” explains Manhart. “They want to avoid big hanging speaker boxes that might block the view of their stage backdrop and projection screen.”

Direct Pro Audio opted to install an Iconyx IC Live Digitally Steerable Array System by Renkus-Heinz. IC Live’s slim profile and customized color make it virtually disappear into the wall, a major factor in its selection.

The installed system includes two ICL-FR-DUAL loudspeakers, each with 16 drivers per side. The loudspeakers have been custom-painted to blend almost seamlessly into the temple’s stage area and are mounted permanently on both walls flanking the stage. Two IC Live sub-woofers are tucked into a nook just below the speakers.

Other system components include a Roland M-300 digital mixing console and a variety of Audix wired and wireless mics.

The renovated temple has seating for approximately 600, but a moveable air wall located in the rear of the temple allows them to accommodate up to 800 people when necessary.

Reports Manhart, “The IC Llive system is low profile, custom painted to match the décor, and has great quality sound output. Nothing else on the market can really do that.”

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Yamaha LS9 Digital Console Breathes New Life into The Living Christmas Tree

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Living Christmas Tree at Grace Bible Church in Oxnard, California recently added a Yamaha LS9-32 digital audio console to enhance its six annual performances. The church, built in 1970, began The Living Christmas Tree program in 1973. Housed in a tree-like structure designed and built by several church members, the set can hold over 70 singers.

The sanctuary was modified to accommodate 48 1,000-watt Leko theatrical lighting fixtures, two follow spots, associated dimmers, and a 24” mirror ball. Sadly, the modifications didn’t include permanently installed audio, so for The Living Tree and other special theater events, a large portable sound system was brought in. The earlier productions were accompanied by musicians with some very elaborate stage sets that included a ski slope, toboggan run, and ice rink. In 2003, the original “Tree” structure was replaced by a new commercially built structure that was easier to assemble and more convenient for the singers to climb into.

“Changing times meant that we had to handle production differently than in the past,” states Alan Hatmaker, Chairman of the Elder Board and lead audio tech. “For instance, with an all-volunteer production team, we cut costs and production complications by moving from a live orchestra to professional backup tracks.” Since Grace Bible Church is a small 100-member church, they opened up the cast to members of other churches in the area. This year, the member cast of over 60 singers is made up of members from 14 churches.

“Instead of purchasing tickets, we ask the audience to bring cans of food for Ventura County (CA) Food Share,” says Hatmaker. “For the last nine years, the audiences have given over 20,000 pounds of food (3,000 pounds last year alone), and enough offerings to keep the program going. We also asked the local Rescue Mission to provide support for help set up and dismantling of the Tree structure and portable staging.”

Hatmaker designed a sound system back in 1981 that consisted of a large portable system built around a Yamaha MQ Series console. “We chose the MQ for its many professional features and overall quality. In 1991, the church decided to upgrade the installed sound system. The centerpiece of the system was a Yamaha PM1200-32 console. Since the PM1200 was an “entry level” pro series console, it gave us great value with its high-quality construction (weighing in at around 150 pounds) and great features. The PM1200 served us well for the past 20+ years until this year when it was replaced by the Yamaha LS9-32. We chose the LS9 since it, like the PM1200, is an “entry level”, high-quality Yamaha professional series console, that will provide us the same long-term service we had with the PM1200.”

Hatmaker said that one of the biggest features of the Yamaha LS9 for his purpose is the console’s built-in effects, ‘more than I could have ever imagined.’ “This feature alone allows us to remove five pieces of outboard gear between the console and amplifiers, resulting in higher reliability of our overall system. The LS9 is great for going from “Tree” setup to Sunday service setup. We use the Scene function to “toggle” between the two set-ups.” He also sights compressors, available for each channel, as another feature the audio team appreciates. Hatmaker noted that he received a few of hours of initial training on the Yamaha console and trains all of the volunteer audio operators.

Times and consoles have certainly evolved. “With the PM1200, I had to write down all of the channel settings for the Tree so I could return to them after the Sunday service!”

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. The company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker products. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

METRIC HALO SUPPORTS LIVE ORGAN RECORDING AT ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN CHURCH DURING AES TECH TOUR

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – DECEMBER 2011: It was a unique confluence of events in late October that led to a mind-expanding technical tour for participants of the annual AES conference in New York City. Veteran classical music engineer and educator Bill Siegmund of Digital Island Studios, LLC, organized the “Live Organ Recital Recording” tour, a rather grey title for an event that ended up lively and colorful. The recording took place at New York’s famed St. Peter’s Lutheran Church. Well known as ‘the jazz church,’ St. Peter’s current sanctuary resides below the Citigroup Building and was constructed with an ear for music. Celebrated organist Walter Hilse played the church’s massive Klais manual tracker organ, and Siegmund recorded it with the help of his trusty Metric Halo interfaces. The event allowed participants to reflect not just on the mechanics of mic placement and remote monitoring, but also on the philosophical underpinnings of recording and the place of recorded music in today’s technological zeitgeist.

Although Siegmund was excited to encourage experimentation regarding many aspects of the session, the core of his rig was, after years of development, set. He placed a Metric Halo ULN-8 and an LIO-8 (outfitted with mic pres) on stage, minimizing delicate mic-level cable runs. The Metric Halo boxes provided high-end preamplification and AD conversion. The digital outputs fed an RME MADI converter for the long run downstairs to the makeshift control room where DA conversion was handled by another LIO-8. There, a MacBook and a surround sound ensemble of Neumann KH 120 monitors paired with a Genelec 7070A subwoofer allowed all participants to travel back and forth between the hall and the control room for an “is it live, or is it Memorex?” experience.

Siegmund originally converted, so to speak, to Metric Halo converters in 2005 with a 2882+DSP. “The flexibility, compactness, and sound of the 2882 is what drew me to Metric Halo originally,” he said. “And when they introduced the 2D card I added one in 2009. But as I came to appreciate a few of the 2882′s limitations, I petitioned Metric Halo for an updated box that would overcome them. Quite independently, they introduced the ULN-8 just weeks later. Although I’ve never been an early adopter, the ULN-8 was like a dream come true. I purchased mine two days later, taking advantage of the deal Metric Halo extended to existing users. And when it arrived, my new ULN-8 came straight out of the box and with me to Nashville to record Schnittke violin sonatas for Naxos with classical producer and fellow MH user Jamey Lamar.”

“Now I use my ULN-8, together with the sibling LIO-8 (with mic pres), on every date. They’re road warriors! I appreciate the fact that each unit packs eight channels of fantastic preamplification, conversion, DSP, routing, and mixing into just one rack space. With all their mic gain, my ribbons never break a sweat, and my Schoeps, DPA, Neumann and Sennheiser condensers work to their full potential. Moreover, I can adjust gain and routing from a remote control room. I was able to sell my Rosetta 800 and eight channels of John Hardy M-1s, shaving valuable pounds from my remote recording rigs.”

He also cites the ability to pre-configure sessions via Metric Halo software – away from the stress of the actual event – as a great contributor to more effective workflow. “In May 2010, WFMT in Chicago hired us to do the first live radio broadcast from the newly renovated Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. We had mics for performers onstage, our two radio hosts, and their guests, set up in the stage left wing and we set up a control room in the back of the house. The ULN-8 was onstage, one of my 2882s was in the wing, and another 2882 was in the control room (I hadn’t gotten my LIO-8 yet). We didn’t know how many guests we were going to have nor when they would appear. And ISDN transmission lines out of the hall were only installed on the afternoon of the show! But with MIO Console I was able to set-up a mixer in advance, one with enough flexibility and room for expansion to accommodate the inevitable “oh, by the way” changes at the venue. The broadcast went to air flawlessly.”

Meanwhile, back at St. Peter’s, Siegmund began with a mic setup that he has used successfully there before. A pair of DPA 4006 TLs (with acoustical pressure equalizers to form an M 50-like polar pattern) together with an M-S pair of Schoeps MK 41 and MK 8, formed a Decca tree for the principle pickup. A pair of Schoeps MK 21s in an NOS-array was pointed away from the organ and used for surround pickup. “To produce the final mix, I use the surround mics to feed a reverb unit,” he explained. “It’s a wonderfully diffuse input.” The tree plus surrounds were about thirty-five feet off the floor on a custom mic stand. And since this was also an AES tech tour, Siegmund added three alternate stereo pick-ups for comparison. A pair of Neumann Solution D digital mics hung fifteen feet up. Sennheiser MKH-800s were used in a Blumlein array. Lastly, and most curiously, he used the room’s catwalk to suspend a spaced pair of Schoeps MK 2H omnis sixty feet off the floor.

“One of the students asked the very reasonable question, why are we putting mics in places where no human ears ever go?” recalled Siegmund. “Resident cantor and organist Thomas Schmidt beat me to the answer. He pointed out that, for instance, you can go to Carnegie Hall, sit in the back row, and still have a wonderful musical experience. But if you stuck mics there, you’d never be hired again! The information content and context of recorded music is quite different from the live experience, and the recording technique demands a different approach. As recording engineers, it’s our responsibility to keep a listener engaged when the visual and visceral elements of a live performance are not present. It turns out that an organ recording will often convey the excitement of the live experience with the mics high up off the floor.”

Very special thanks for a successful AES Technical Tour go to Allen Rowand and Jon Stern of Metric Halo, Chris Spahr of Sennheiser USA, Duke Markos of Duke Markos Audio, and AES Convention Chairman Jim Anderson.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Based in New York’s Hudson Valley, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware. www.mhlabs.com

Pro Audio Monitoring System Manufacturer Blue Sky Creates YouTube Video Aimed At Consumers & End-Users

Pro audio monitoring system manufacturer, Blue Sky, has maintained a core philosophy since its inception in 2001: to design and offer products that represent the highest ratio of performance-to-cost as well as a superior sound experience for its customers—from home enthusiasts to entertainment content creation professionals. Taking a cue from its in-depth website “Key Concepts” section, which addresses the company’s philosophy on topics ranging from the “Basics of Bass Management” to the “Truth About Subwoofers”, Blue Sky has created an in-depth video on its own YouTube channel to promote the company, its philosophy and the full line of components and systems it offers for home, personal, and professional studio use. 


Targeted to the end-user and consumer, Blue Sky’s first foray into the world of video was produced by Andrew Wild of Wild Touch Productions. Just over 7 minutes, the video outlines the complete Blue Sky story and showcases the full-range professional monitoring components and lines—from the entry-level 2.1 desktop eXo2 to the mid- and large-scale music/film dubbing systems including MediaDesk, ProDesk, Sky System One and Big Blue. Additionally, you’ll hear raves and reviews from two of Blue Sky’s professional proponents, Chris Unthank, Director of Transfer Operations at Larson Studios and Audio Director/Gaming Sound Designer Greg Allen (formerly of UbiSoft and Electronic Arts).

“Our intention with this new video is essentially to reintroduce the brand to the customer through social media outlets including YouTube and Facebook,” said Blue Sky Vice President Chris Fichera. “Outside of the traditional sales and marketing arena, we want to speak directly to our end-users to reiterate what we are about technically, what makes the Blue Sky brand and products unique—including offering components designed to complement each other and seamless systems built around the bass management concept, and to offer a few raves from some of our hardest-working customers. That’s what we were after and I believe we achieved it.”

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