A virtual press conference from Sound & Video Contractor

Archive of the Worship Facilities Expo Newslink Category

Yamaha LS9 Digital Console Breathes New Life into The Living Christmas Tree

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Living Christmas Tree at Grace Bible Church in Oxnard, California recently added a Yamaha LS9-32 digital audio console to enhance its six annual performances. The church, built in 1970, began The Living Christmas Tree program in 1973. Housed in a tree-like structure designed and built by several church members, the set can hold over 70 singers.

The sanctuary was modified to accommodate 48 1,000-watt Leko theatrical lighting fixtures, two follow spots, associated dimmers, and a 24” mirror ball. Sadly, the modifications didn’t include permanently installed audio, so for The Living Tree and other special theater events, a large portable sound system was brought in. The earlier productions were accompanied by musicians with some very elaborate stage sets that included a ski slope, toboggan run, and ice rink. In 2003, the original “Tree” structure was replaced by a new commercially built structure that was easier to assemble and more convenient for the singers to climb into.

“Changing times meant that we had to handle production differently than in the past,” states Alan Hatmaker, Chairman of the Elder Board and lead audio tech. “For instance, with an all-volunteer production team, we cut costs and production complications by moving from a live orchestra to professional backup tracks.” Since Grace Bible Church is a small 100-member church, they opened up the cast to members of other churches in the area. This year, the member cast of over 60 singers is made up of members from 14 churches.

“Instead of purchasing tickets, we ask the audience to bring cans of food for Ventura County (CA) Food Share,” says Hatmaker. “For the last nine years, the audiences have given over 20,000 pounds of food (3,000 pounds last year alone), and enough offerings to keep the program going. We also asked the local Rescue Mission to provide support for help set up and dismantling of the Tree structure and portable staging.”

Hatmaker designed a sound system back in 1981 that consisted of a large portable system built around a Yamaha MQ Series console. “We chose the MQ for its many professional features and overall quality. In 1991, the church decided to upgrade the installed sound system. The centerpiece of the system was a Yamaha PM1200-32 console. Since the PM1200 was an “entry level” pro series console, it gave us great value with its high-quality construction (weighing in at around 150 pounds) and great features. The PM1200 served us well for the past 20+ years until this year when it was replaced by the Yamaha LS9-32. We chose the LS9 since it, like the PM1200, is an “entry level”, high-quality Yamaha professional series console, that will provide us the same long-term service we had with the PM1200.”

Hatmaker said that one of the biggest features of the Yamaha LS9 for his purpose is the console’s built-in effects, ‘more than I could have ever imagined.’ “This feature alone allows us to remove five pieces of outboard gear between the console and amplifiers, resulting in higher reliability of our overall system. The LS9 is great for going from “Tree” setup to Sunday service setup. We use the Scene function to “toggle” between the two set-ups.” He also sights compressors, available for each channel, as another feature the audio team appreciates. Hatmaker noted that he received a few of hours of initial training on the Yamaha console and trains all of the volunteer audio operators.

Times and consoles have certainly evolved. “With the PM1200, I had to write down all of the channel settings for the Tree so I could return to them after the Sunday service!”

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. The company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker products. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

METRIC HALO SUPPORTS LIVE ORGAN RECORDING AT ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN CHURCH DURING AES TECH TOUR

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – DECEMBER 2011: It was a unique confluence of events in late October that led to a mind-expanding technical tour for participants of the annual AES conference in New York City. Veteran classical music engineer and educator Bill Siegmund of Digital Island Studios, LLC, organized the “Live Organ Recital Recording” tour, a rather grey title for an event that ended up lively and colorful. The recording took place at New York’s famed St. Peter’s Lutheran Church. Well known as ‘the jazz church,’ St. Peter’s current sanctuary resides below the Citigroup Building and was constructed with an ear for music. Celebrated organist Walter Hilse played the church’s massive Klais manual tracker organ, and Siegmund recorded it with the help of his trusty Metric Halo interfaces. The event allowed participants to reflect not just on the mechanics of mic placement and remote monitoring, but also on the philosophical underpinnings of recording and the place of recorded music in today’s technological zeitgeist.

Although Siegmund was excited to encourage experimentation regarding many aspects of the session, the core of his rig was, after years of development, set. He placed a Metric Halo ULN-8 and an LIO-8 (outfitted with mic pres) on stage, minimizing delicate mic-level cable runs. The Metric Halo boxes provided high-end preamplification and AD conversion. The digital outputs fed an RME MADI converter for the long run downstairs to the makeshift control room where DA conversion was handled by another LIO-8. There, a MacBook and a surround sound ensemble of Neumann KH 120 monitors paired with a Genelec 7070A subwoofer allowed all participants to travel back and forth between the hall and the control room for an “is it live, or is it Memorex?” experience.

Siegmund originally converted, so to speak, to Metric Halo converters in 2005 with a 2882+DSP. “The flexibility, compactness, and sound of the 2882 is what drew me to Metric Halo originally,” he said. “And when they introduced the 2D card I added one in 2009. But as I came to appreciate a few of the 2882′s limitations, I petitioned Metric Halo for an updated box that would overcome them. Quite independently, they introduced the ULN-8 just weeks later. Although I’ve never been an early adopter, the ULN-8 was like a dream come true. I purchased mine two days later, taking advantage of the deal Metric Halo extended to existing users. And when it arrived, my new ULN-8 came straight out of the box and with me to Nashville to record Schnittke violin sonatas for Naxos with classical producer and fellow MH user Jamey Lamar.”

“Now I use my ULN-8, together with the sibling LIO-8 (with mic pres), on every date. They’re road warriors! I appreciate the fact that each unit packs eight channels of fantastic preamplification, conversion, DSP, routing, and mixing into just one rack space. With all their mic gain, my ribbons never break a sweat, and my Schoeps, DPA, Neumann and Sennheiser condensers work to their full potential. Moreover, I can adjust gain and routing from a remote control room. I was able to sell my Rosetta 800 and eight channels of John Hardy M-1s, shaving valuable pounds from my remote recording rigs.”

He also cites the ability to pre-configure sessions via Metric Halo software – away from the stress of the actual event – as a great contributor to more effective workflow. “In May 2010, WFMT in Chicago hired us to do the first live radio broadcast from the newly renovated Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. We had mics for performers onstage, our two radio hosts, and their guests, set up in the stage left wing and we set up a control room in the back of the house. The ULN-8 was onstage, one of my 2882s was in the wing, and another 2882 was in the control room (I hadn’t gotten my LIO-8 yet). We didn’t know how many guests we were going to have nor when they would appear. And ISDN transmission lines out of the hall were only installed on the afternoon of the show! But with MIO Console I was able to set-up a mixer in advance, one with enough flexibility and room for expansion to accommodate the inevitable “oh, by the way” changes at the venue. The broadcast went to air flawlessly.”

Meanwhile, back at St. Peter’s, Siegmund began with a mic setup that he has used successfully there before. A pair of DPA 4006 TLs (with acoustical pressure equalizers to form an M 50-like polar pattern) together with an M-S pair of Schoeps MK 41 and MK 8, formed a Decca tree for the principle pickup. A pair of Schoeps MK 21s in an NOS-array was pointed away from the organ and used for surround pickup. “To produce the final mix, I use the surround mics to feed a reverb unit,” he explained. “It’s a wonderfully diffuse input.” The tree plus surrounds were about thirty-five feet off the floor on a custom mic stand. And since this was also an AES tech tour, Siegmund added three alternate stereo pick-ups for comparison. A pair of Neumann Solution D digital mics hung fifteen feet up. Sennheiser MKH-800s were used in a Blumlein array. Lastly, and most curiously, he used the room’s catwalk to suspend a spaced pair of Schoeps MK 2H omnis sixty feet off the floor.

“One of the students asked the very reasonable question, why are we putting mics in places where no human ears ever go?” recalled Siegmund. “Resident cantor and organist Thomas Schmidt beat me to the answer. He pointed out that, for instance, you can go to Carnegie Hall, sit in the back row, and still have a wonderful musical experience. But if you stuck mics there, you’d never be hired again! The information content and context of recorded music is quite different from the live experience, and the recording technique demands a different approach. As recording engineers, it’s our responsibility to keep a listener engaged when the visual and visceral elements of a live performance are not present. It turns out that an organ recording will often convey the excitement of the live experience with the mics high up off the floor.”

Very special thanks for a successful AES Technical Tour go to Allen Rowand and Jon Stern of Metric Halo, Chris Spahr of Sennheiser USA, Duke Markos of Duke Markos Audio, and AES Convention Chairman Jim Anderson.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Based in New York’s Hudson Valley, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware. www.mhlabs.com

Pro Audio Monitoring System Manufacturer Blue Sky Creates YouTube Video Aimed At Consumers & End-Users

Pro audio monitoring system manufacturer, Blue Sky, has maintained a core philosophy since its inception in 2001: to design and offer products that represent the highest ratio of performance-to-cost as well as a superior sound experience for its customers—from home enthusiasts to entertainment content creation professionals. Taking a cue from its in-depth website “Key Concepts” section, which addresses the company’s philosophy on topics ranging from the “Basics of Bass Management” to the “Truth About Subwoofers”, Blue Sky has created an in-depth video on its own YouTube channel to promote the company, its philosophy and the full line of components and systems it offers for home, personal, and professional studio use. 


Targeted to the end-user and consumer, Blue Sky’s first foray into the world of video was produced by Andrew Wild of Wild Touch Productions. Just over 7 minutes, the video outlines the complete Blue Sky story and showcases the full-range professional monitoring components and lines—from the entry-level 2.1 desktop eXo2 to the mid- and large-scale music/film dubbing systems including MediaDesk, ProDesk, Sky System One and Big Blue. Additionally, you’ll hear raves and reviews from two of Blue Sky’s professional proponents, Chris Unthank, Director of Transfer Operations at Larson Studios and Audio Director/Gaming Sound Designer Greg Allen (formerly of UbiSoft and Electronic Arts).

“Our intention with this new video is essentially to reintroduce the brand to the customer through social media outlets including YouTube and Facebook,” said Blue Sky Vice President Chris Fichera. “Outside of the traditional sales and marketing arena, we want to speak directly to our end-users to reiterate what we are about technically, what makes the Blue Sky brand and products unique—including offering components designed to complement each other and seamless systems built around the bass management concept, and to offer a few raves from some of our hardest-working customers. That’s what we were after and I believe we achieved it.”

WRIGHT CONSULTING ASSOCIATES INC. CREATES DESIGN SOLUTIONS USING DANLEY MINI SUBS AND GENESIS HORNS

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA – NOVEMBER 2011: Since its formation in 1985 on the burgeoning north side of Indianapolis, Indiana, College Park Church has grown consistently and rapidly. Its early meetings at a local hotel quickly overflowed and inspired a move to a local warehouse where, after a few years of fundraising, College Park set down roots in a new building all its own. But its blessing of growth continued apace, inspiring one, then two, then three Sunday services. Now, decades later, College Park Church is celebrating the completion of a new 4,000-seat sanctuary with raked seating that can accommodate the entire congregation (for now at least!). David Wright, president at Wright Consulting Associates, recommended a subwoofer solution with Danley Sound Labs TH-MINI subwoofers, which are small, (true to their name), tremendously efficient, and truthful (true to their brand). WCA arranged an audition for the church A/V tech team and recommended that subwoofers already designed be replaced with Danley models instead.

College Park Church’s musical style is best described as contemporary, diverse… and big. A live band, a full choir, and an orchestra complement the sermon. Indeed, the services often incorporate dramatic reenactments and prerecorded multimedia support, both of which require full sound reinforcement.

“Originally some soft ideas about ground stacking subwoofers in fairly arbitrary positions along front walls and corners of the room led to inconsistent low end,” said Wright. “Flying subs is always preferred by Wright but structural considerations conspired to nix the idea. The next best idea was to hide subwoofers underneath the center dais.

“But the space underneath the dais kept getting smaller during construction,” Wright continued. “It was an ideal application of the Danley TH-MINI subwoofer, which we had flown successfully in other projects. The TH-MINI is the only subwoofer on the market that could be hidden under the dais and yet still deliver compelling deep bass to 4,000 seats.” Although audio products used in audio systems are important, Wright is quick to point out that they are nothing without proper balancing and commissioning. “That intangible part of the system was done exceptionally well by Acoustic Dimensions, who we originally recommended to Aspen Group, our architect. By cleverly employing delays, listeners anywhere in the sanctuary naturally localize all sounds to the stage, the best part of the design and key to the performance of the system.”

Looking to the future, Wright will again employ eight Danley TH-MINI subwoofers in Indianapolis’ Shortridge High School, an historical location. In a state where basketball is king, (eighteen of the largest high school gyms in the USA are located in Indiana – and it was the inspiration for the movie Hoosiers) the school’s new 4,000-seat gymnasium will be large enough to host large sectional tournaments. Wright and his employees Daniel Farrar and Russ Hoppel carefully modeled the space in EASE and determined that the bass component would be best served by flying two end-firing subwoofer arrays, each lobe aimed at one of two gigantic bleacher sections, to minimize spill from room surfaces.

But the modeling served an acoustics purpose first. “We worked to simultaneously keep the acoustic budget in line even while bringing a six-second reverb down to one-and-a-half seconds,” explained Wright. “We considered a number of full-range solutions and planned to present them to the client as a ‘good, better, best’ option set.” But we were surprised that the “best” option was two Danley Genesis GH-60 horns, one for each bleacher section. Its efficiency and tight pattern control would work in synergy with well placed acoustical treatments to maintain impact and clarity. “The numbers led us to the realization that the Danley solution would be less expensive than the original design. Wright said. “The Genesis Horn coverage and efficiency allowed us to replace nine other boxes with just two Danleys. The reduction in the total loudspeaker cost combined with the reduction in installation labor made the Danley solution the least expensive and also best performing.”

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS
Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

Audinate Partners with Inter-M

Largest South Korean Manufacturer of Pro Audio Licenses Dante™
Portland, OR-Nov. 21, 2011- Audinate announced today that Inter-M, South Korea’s largest PA and installed sound manufacturer, has agreed to collaborate to produce a line of products that will feature Dante, Audinate’s patented media networking technology. Audinate is the creator of Dante, the most advanced audio networking solution that is built using standards based IP over Ethernet.

Inter-M has been building quality commercial sound and professional audio products with a single-mindedness of purpose: “We Make It Easy” for its products to be designed and installed into systems. Known for their P.A Systems, S.R Systems, Consoles, Speakers, CCTV Systems, Wireless System, Microphones and DVR, Inter-M products are featured throughout Korea in Stadiums, Performing Arts Centers, office buildings and Houses of Worship. Inter-M is a publically listed company on the Korean Stock Exchange (KOSDAQ)

“Inter-M is a great brand in Korea and is expanding rapidly around the world.” said Lee Ellison CEO for Audinate. “Inter-M has an aggressive plan to connect their wide variety of products into an integrated system using Dante.”

“We believe having Dante in our systems gives us a definite competitive advantage” stated Wonho Lee, Director if R&D at Inter-M. “We selected Dante because it provides us with an audio over IP solution today, and Audinate is the only company that can offer a viable transition path to AVB for the future.”

Inter-M plans using Dante end-to-end throughout their systems, from Dante-enabled paging microphones, through mixers and distribution units, to Dante-enabled powered speakers.

###

About Audinate
Audinate revolutionizes the way that AV systems are connected by transporting high-quality media over standard IT networks. Using Audinate’s patented Dante networking solution, digital media networking just got easy. Audinate’s solution has been licensed by customers across the AV industry and can be found in installations and live sound applications globally. Audinate is a Promoter Member of the AVnu Alliance™. Audinate offices are located in US, United Kingdom and Australia. Dante is a trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd.

Visit www.audinate.com for the latest news and information on the company.

About Inter-M
Inter-M has become a leading company with a competitive edge in the audio, video, and communications markets worldwide. Inter-M strives to make great contributions to the community with new products and technology, with many successful high-profile installations around the world. Inter-M is located in Korea and has been in business for 28 years.

SYMETRIX JUPITER PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY BENEFITS RODGERS ORGANS

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA – NOVEMBER 2011: For over half a century, Rodgers Instrument Corporation has been designing and manufacturing church, concert, and home organs that strike a magical balance between the deep traditions of so elegant an instrument and the cutting edge technologies that can make organs accessible to a wider audience. Recently, Rodgers signed Novo Group of San Francisco as the new dealer for Rodgers organs in Northern California. With almost thirty years of parallel experience in the acoustical/audio/video integration business, Novo Group principal Art Yeap made a small tweak to the standard Rodgers installation protocol: he added an 8-in/8-out Symetrix Jupiter 8 processor between the organ outputs and the amplifiers. The addition allows him to make a number of small adjustments that sum to a noticeably more balanced and musical whole.

Rodgers organs are found throughout the world in places both prestigious and intimate. For example, Carnegie Hall boasts a celebrated Rodgers organ that was dedicated by Virgil Fox, the most famous organist of the last century. At the other end of the spectrum, Rodgers organs can be found in the homes of many organ enthusiasts. However, the vast majority of new installations performed by Novo Group go into churches. Most are between two and four manual (i.e. keyboards) and based on proprietary digital synthesis technology. “Not only does Rodgers’ digital synthesis seek to capture the intentional attributes of organ sound, but it also seeks to recreate the anomalies and imperfections,” said Yeap. “For example, a Rodgers organ is continuously detuned in slight and random ways to recreate the nonlinearities of a pipe organ in the context of ever-shifting atmospherics.”

Each organ has multiple unbalanced stereo outputs that correspond with the ranks or sets of each division. In addition to the advanced processing capabilities that it gives him, Yeap inserts the Symetrix Jupiter 8 right at an organ’s output (and housed within the organ chassis!) to provide a true balanced output to the amplifier. “I’m still flexible, but after so many decades working with sound, I do have some strong opinions,” Yeap laughed. “The amplifiers that are standard with a Rodgers organ run close to their limit. So I replace them with Crown XLS-series amplifiers.” Because the amplifiers are sometimes quite remote, the balanced line is guaranteed to be quieter and more reliable.

Once inserted and housed, Yeap loads the “Line Processor 1″ app onto the Symetrix Jupiter 8 and uses Symetrix’ simple PC-based software to dial in the perfect speaker sound given the idiosyncrasies of the room that the organ will live in. His baseline processing includes high-pass filtering for those divisions that don’t have low bass and overall limiting to protect the loudspeakers from the potentially more powerful amplifiers. At volumes within the range that the factory speakers are capable of producing, the limiter lets signal pass unaffected. The limiter only kicks in at higher volumes.

“We selected the Symetrix Jupiter processor for this application because it is incredibly transparent, easy to use, and competitively priced,” said Yeap. “Its noise floor is below that of the organ itself and I have no qualms about an additional AD and DA conversion because it’s so faithful. The Jupiter’s app paradigm is simple to use, and even though I’m comfortable with the more complex open-architecture platforms out there, the Jupiter’s simplicity makes installation fast and painless. I just set my laptop on the organ, connect to the Jupiter via Ethernet, and dial it in.” Because the Jupiter powers up without hassle, Yeap can tie it into the master power for the entire organ system. The client doesn’t even need to know it’s there.

“The combination of additional processing and more amplifier headroom makes for a noticeably better organ sound,” said Yeap. “In fact, one of the Rodgers factory personnel who has been working with the organs for decades paid us an unsolicited compliment. He said our installations are the very best he’s ever heard a Rodgers organ sound. I’d say we’re doing something right!”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Sound professionals rely upon the performance, value and reliability of audio mixing, routing and processing products from Symetrix. For more information on Symetrix professional audio products, please visit www.symetrix.co or call +1.425.778.7728.

Yamaha 01V96i Mixer Launched


BUENA PARK, Calif.—Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. has announced the launch of the new 01V96i Digital Mixer, making its first official debut at this week’s InterBee Show. The new 01V96i offers a 16-track USB 2.0 interface for multi-track recording via MAC or PC. The new unit is identical in mixing functionality as its predecessor but cosmetically takes on a new black look for easy differentiation from the previous 01V Series dark blue. Since its initial release in 1998, the 01V has been used in a wide variety of applications, both personal and professional, ranging from recording and production environments to live sound and installation applications.
more

Lake Processing Added to Yamaha Digital Products


BUENA PARK, Calif.—In conjunction with the official InterBee Show announcement today by Yamaha Corporation Japan, Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. announces the development of the MY8-LAKE processing card, designed exclusively for Yamaha digital products. The new card, to be distributed worldwide by Yamaha, adds cutting edge Lake® Technology to PM5D, PM5D-RH, M7CL, LS9, DM2000, DM1000, 02R96, and 01V96 digital consoles, as well as DSP5D Expander, DME24N/64N processors, and TXn power amplifiers.
more

EDA PRO GROUP NAMED SYMETRIX U.S. REP OF THE YEAR FOR SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON – NOVEMBER 2011: Symetrix announced that EDA Pro Group, LLC of Snellville, Georgia earned its “Fiscal Year 2011 U.S. Representative of the Year Award” for the second year in a row. EDA Pro Group represents Symetrix products in the southeastern United States and has consistently returned sales well beyond expectation.
more

TIGHTER, EFFICIENT, MUSICAL, TRANSPARENT. DANLEY BOXES DELIVER FOR CANADA’S GRANT MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CANADA – NOVEMBER 2011: Grant Memorial Baptist Church in Winnipeg, Manitoba was founded by Scandinavian immigrants in 1894. In the hundred-plus years that followed, Grant Memorial grew steadily into a cornerstone of Winnipeg civic life. Today, a residence for seniors and a K-12 school (serving over 800 students) share the modest property that also includes the church’s over 1,500-seat sanctuary (1,123 Main/430 Balcony) and multi-purpose auditorium. Until recently, the school’s renown for performing arts education was a bit of an irony, as the A/V system in the auditorium that supported its public performances, as well as weekend services, did not match the caliber of the content or talent. With some brotherly advice, Grant Memorial recently celebrated, as part of a number of other capital projects, a new Danley Sound Labs-based sound reinforcement system that is now perfectly musical and intelligible.
more

About

Stay up to date on the latest technology news. Select press representatives post company news several times a day. Check back often to get the latest news on product releases, mergers and acquisitions, and product applications. To be included in this virtual press conference, please contact The Wire.

Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication