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Archive of the Loudspeakers Category

Canterbury Church Gains Invisible Intelligibility with Renkus-Heinz Iconyx

 Mountain Brook, AL – March 2015…  Established in 1950, Canterbury UMC has grown to embrace both traditional and contemporary worship styles, with separate sanctuaries for each on its Mountain Brook, Alabama campus. Recently, the church engaged Twist Technology of nearby Birmingham to address its ongoing issues with intelligibility of the spoken word in the main (traditional) sanctuary.

For Twist CEO Lynn McCroskey, there were two challenges to be overcome in this design/build project. “First, we had to create articulation in an extremely reverberant environment,” he explains. “At the same time, aesthetics was a primary concern. This is a beautiful worship space, and they did not want to see a big speaker cluster or anything like that.”

Two Iconyx IC24-R-II digitally steerable column arrays cover the entire room, delivering advanced digital beam steering to direct the sound to the seating areas, and away from the side walls, balcony facings, and other reflective surfaces. And the Iconyx slim, low-profile design enabled Twist to create a system that sounded great, with minimal visual impact.

 “The IC24 column is 10 feet tall, but only about six inches wide, so it’s really more like an architectural element than a loudspeaker,” says McCroskey. “It’s designed to be flush-mounted to the walls, so there is no interference with the congregation’s sightlines. With the precision color-matched paint job, they really just look like part of the building. Most people don’t even realize that there are two 10-foot tall speaker columns behind the altar. The church elders are very pleased and impressed.”

Iconyx steered beam technology enabled Twist Technology to meet Canterbury’s seemingly conflicting goals of preserving the sanctuary’s big sound while creating exceptional intelligibility. “We’ve used the Iconyx successfully in several architecturally sensitive installations,” McCroskey reports. “The directional control is a huge help with articulation, and really helps control reverberation. For a large space like this, with high, vaulted ceilings, a balcony, and hard surfaces everywhere, beam steering is the perfect solution. The pipe organ and choir music still soars, but now the spoken word can be clearly understood from every seat.”

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About Renkus-Heinz - Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

AV Concepts Pushes Envelope with Dante Media Networking for Live Event Production

PORTLAND, OR – February 26, 2015 – AV Concepts, an experiential marketing partner focused on delivering creative and technical event solutions, has integrated Dante networking into its production and event systems to cost-effectively migrate its audio infrastructure to a networked routing and distribution environment. The transition to Audinate’s Dante solution, in combination with AV Concepts’ investment in fiber optic systems, enables AV Concepts to set up its networked audio architecture in 30 to 45 minutes, compared to the six-to-eight hours typically spent deploying a legacy audio system.

Delivering best-in-class audio solutions continues to be a key focus for AV Concepts as the company evolves its strategy to effectively deliver cutting-edge creative and technical staging services. The need to deliver more audio channels at higher quality influenced the company to evaluate various media networking solutions available today. Seeking a solution to simplify infrastructure with flexibility to scale for event size, AV Concepts quickly focused on building a new system based on Dante. The company’s first Dante networking solution was such a success that they are in the process of building a second Dante production system.

“We are winning new business because of Dante,” said Jason Thiele, Audio Systems Engineer at AV Concepts. “Engineers want to work with innovative new technology, and our research and experience has proven Dante to be our best choice as a standard networking solution.”

On average, AV Concepts utilizes 180 routed channels per event. For Thiele, the headaches of the analog universe almost always tied to configuration and troubleshooting – headaches that quickly escalated and consumed far too much of their customers’ valuable time on show site. Thiele and his colleagues carefully compared Dante and several additional networking solutions but found the others underwhelming.

“We found that most of these systems were about putting a box on each end to move audio, and we wanted a more flexible system,” explained Thiele. “We wanted a turnkey system that could send as many channels as we wanted across a network and covered the entire chain, right up to the PA system. We recognized the benefits of Dante after Yamaha launched its CL console series, and we quickly redesigned our entire infrastructure to be Dante across the board. With fiber connections and Cisco layer 3 managed switches, we can easily route whatever we need to, wherever we need to go. And we can quickly make changes to scale the network for events of any size.”

That flexibility has been a major benefit of the Dante transition according to Thiele, given the drastic reduction in installation time, labor and complexity he and his team have experienced.

“With the new Dante Controller, we send the network template to the front of house (FOH) crew so they can pull up our configuration,” said Thiele. “The Dante channels automatically correspond to the devices on the network. Additionally, when they load a USB stick into their console, it readily
looks for the device and a specific Dante channel. Once everything is plugged in and turned on, the signals are automatically routed. There is no more worrying about a patch list from the FOH team.”

Today, an AV Concepts event experience incorporates multiple Shure ULXD4Q wireless microphones, five Extron DMP128 digital matrix systems, two Yamaha Rio I/O stageboxes, and a Yamaha CL5 console with two additional Yamaha MY16-AUD cards. The infrastructure also includes 45 Dante Virtual Soundcards to enable audio networking from computing platforms, giving the AV Concepts team additional flexibility with bringing audio signals onto the network.

Because of Dante’s flexibility, AV Concepts can take advantage of a number of improvements and benefits in preparation for and during events. The team can also easily add or drop microphones and stageboxes from their Dante network depending on event needs. And the days of having to pinpoint cable issues or address latency concerns during the show are in the past.

“We have the highest-quality standards for our customers,” said Thiele. “The noise floor and signal latency on all of our Dante devices is virtually non-existent. However, the flexibility and scalability are the main benefits. We see other companies that have a console and a couple of Rio racks, but we have found that there are much bigger possibilities with the power of Dante networking. In fact, we have had several competitor companies come to our shop to look at our setup and rig, and they’ve all been amazed at the sophistication and advantages of our system.” As for the true test adds Thiele, “You just need to look at our customer satisfaction to tell the story.”

About AV Concepts
AV Concepts partners with brands, their experiential marketing agencies, and production partners to deliver creative and technical event solutions. We offer a collaborative, in-house approach for general sessions, keynote productions and experiential marketing activations including creative, engineering, technology and staging. From intimate events to large user conferences, we grow and evolve with our clients as their needs adapt and change. And we’re always pushing the envelope, leveraging new technologies, or inventing our own, to ensure we’re creating immersive experiences that dazzle audiences and drive business results. Visit www.avconcepts.com to learn how we can partner with you on your next event or connect with us @avconceptsinc or on LinkedIn.

About Audinate
Audinate revolutionizes AV systems to enable our customers to thrive in a networked world. Audinate’s Dante media networking technology has been adopted by the leading OEM manufacturers and the dominant networking technology in the professional audio/visual industry. Dante is used extensively for live performance events, commercial installation, broadcast, recording and production, and communications systems. Audinate offices are located in US, United Kingdom and Australia. Visit www.audinate.com for the latest news and information on the company. Dante is Digital Media Networking Perfected.

Dante and Dante Via are trademarks of Audinate Pty Ltd, Audinate is a registered trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd.

StoreStreams to Offer Turnkey In-Store Radio to Businesses

Integrated solution removes the headaches of procuring content and licensing, while simplifying deployments and operation through a fully networked system

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, February 24, 2015 — The in-store radio architecture is typically a patchwork of systems and components from different sources to deliver music and advertising to businesses, with challenging scenarios for licensing music and audio content. The formation of StoreStreams aims to simplify the launch and management of a multi-site in-store radio system, cleanly integrating IT network infrastructure with audio players—and providing the content, licensing and user interface to ensure a unified and profitable service.

StoreStreams Data Center

StoreStreams brings together the music catalog and network intelligence of XYZ Stream Hosting, a specialist in live, multiplatform content delivery; with end point hardware supplied through LineQ, a distributor specializing in networked AV equipment. LineQ will supply Ecler Sound amplifiers, Cornered Sound loudspeakers and media players from Barix, an IP audio pioneer with hundreds of thousands of hardware players in deployment worldwide. Furthermore, the service operates on a contract-free, month-to-month basis for maximum operational flexibility.

The StoreStreams service will focus specifically on streaming content to network operators and retail businesses that want a wide selection of music channels, without the headaches of procuring and licensing content. A clean and intuitive interface will allow curators and program managers to build playlists and manage content with ease. Included within the management application is the ability to structure and schedule ad placement, station ID’s and promotional material. For resellers and integrators, the complete integrated package minimizes components and eliminates installation headaches, further accelerating deployments.

Perhaps above all, the reliability of the cloud-based, redundant streaming architecture will ensure a live, branded streaming service with high availability for networks of any scale—ensuring a dynamic, high-quality and uninterrupted in-store radio experience.

“Utilizing 21 data centers, StoreStreams serves retail businesses nationwide with hyper-regionalized content and customized services directly from the data center closest to each business location,” said Charles Odom, vice president of marketing, StoreStreams. “And through our multichannel music library and licensing agreements, our customers will have access to the most up-to-date content with full legality.”

Will Schmidt, vice president of sales for LineQ, adds that packaging the content and licensing into an integrated solution with streaming, content management, and end point tools also makes StoreStreams an ideal platform for content curators. By including content and licensing, curators can manage audio programming for retail businesses without getting involved in the legal aspects of the in-store media business.

“By aligning everything under one management system and offering comfortable month-to-month contracts, StoreStreams and LineQ have a recipe for anyone to succeed at in-store radio,” said Schmidt, adding that the entire solution is engineered to deliver an absorbing retail customer experience. “The placement of the servers and optimization of end points for consistency in live streaming is all designed to provide superior performance. This is a service that is built to satisfy customers for the long haul.”

LineQ is currently offering six months of free service with the purchase of an endpoint device, such as the Barix Exstreamer—the device that receives, decodes and plays out audio content inside stores. The complete solution will be available by end of February.

About StoreStreams
StoreStreams is the turnkey in-store audio solution that integrates seamlessly within retail environments, providing access to a wide-ranging music catalog that complements the atmosphere of any business. Founded by musicians and music lovers, StoreStreams creates customized, branded radio channels that remove the elevator music stigma, and is driven by technology that ensures the highest quality sound. StoreStreams also ensures the highest possible uptime for live streaming services without interruption through its regionalized, redundant server environments, offering reliable and scalable services for both the single retail storefront and large business networks with thousands of locations.

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Renkus-Heinz Helps Conquer Audio Challenges in Canadian Museum for Human Rights

 Winnipeg, Manitoba – February 2015… With a portfolio that includes high-profile museums, performing arts centers, corporate settings, and high-end residential theaters, Milford, CT-based SH Acoustics has gained a well-earned reputation in the rarefied world of sound design for some of the world’s most challenging acoustical spaces. For the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the combination of open architecture, reflective surfaces, and a plethora of multimedia-based exhibits made the firm the preferred choice as acoustic and audio design consultant.

SH Acoustics President and Principal Consultant Steve Haas was invigorated by the challenges the museum presented. “What makes this building unique is the open nature of the architecture,” he explains. “The walls and ceilings rarely meet, and there are few if any right angles. There are literally no doors in the galleries. Even the glass exhibit walls are unique, with open, overlapping ‘shards’ instead of a flat surface. To achieve focused sound in the exhibits and galleries and, more importantly, to control it, required a lot of specific audio gear, acoustical treatments, and careful planning and calibration.”

Renkus-Heinz loudspeakers and steerable array systems proved to be a key tool in realizing the promise and goals of the museum space. “I have had great success with Renkus-Heinz in similarly challenging spaces, especially their Iconyx arrays,” says Haas. “The pattern control and fidelity they offer are ideal for applications like this, which require working closely with architects, engineers and AV designers to deliver the intended sound without bleeding throughout the exhibit galleries.”

Haas cited the Canadian Museum for Human Rights as among the Company’s more challenging recent projects. While the ten main galleries are spread throughout the building’s seven levels, each floor is acoustically coupled to at least several others, with open architecture, reflective glass walls, and oddly-placed criss-crossing ramps connecting and passing through all the galleries. SH Acoustics worked with Electrosonic, a US-based international AV integration firm, and over a dozen media producers from all around the world, to ensure its sound designs would translate accurately to the museum space.

“We used a lot of different techniques to coordinate between the acoustics and audio,” says Haas. “Some were very localized and focused, while other spaces needed a widespread soundscape. In the mini-theater settings, Renkus-Heinz gear was involved in a big way. We used the TRX and CF Series speakers, some with PN112 subwoofers, as primary front delivery speakers behind the screen, because we’ve come to know the preciseness of their radiation pattern.”

For some of the wider theaters, off-axis response naturally became an issue, again with a Renkus-Heinz solution. On the upper level, the “Canadian Journey” gallery utilizes two IC16-R-II digitally steerable line arrays, augmented by PN Series subwoofers. “The Canadian Journey contains dozens of local media experiences, but comes alive each hour with a sound and light show projected on large screens, plus a powerful presentation with live actors,” explains Haas. “The Iconyx digital beam steering makes it easy to transition between the two programs.”

 The mechanically steerable Iconyx IC7 series also found a unique use in the museum’s primary gallery for the multimedia presentation, “What are Human Rights?” Haas explains the challenge: “The screen and seating area are roughly 90 feet wide, with multiple video projectors. We needed low-level localization of sound to cover that very wide bench in a very precise way.” The solution was to use four IC7-II mechanically steered arrays, aimed from above complemented with compact subwoofers embedded in the bench itself and a series of seven TRX speakers behind the large scrim. This provided full-range, focused sound to listeners, while still localizing back to the images on the screen. Strategies like this also helped to avoid interfering with the building’s ceiling speakers, which are required for paging.

Designed by acclaimed architect Antoine Predock and Exhibit Designer, Ralph Appelbaum, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights opened on September 19, 2014 to outstanding reviews. For SH Acoustics, it was another in a long line of acoustical challenges met and conquered. “It’s quite an ingenious design – one of the most fascinating buildings I’ve ever been in,” says Steve Haas. “With both large theaters and small interactive displays in an open acoustic environment, you really have to play with the laws of physics to make it all work together. But with tools like the Renkus-Heinz speakers we’ve come to rely on, it really came together nicely. Everyone is extremely pleased.”

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About Renkus-Heinz - Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

 

Additional Danley Speakers Handle Seating Expansion at Life Pentecostal Church

LifeChurch_RockRun_Interior_1JOLIET, ILLINOIS – FEBRUARY 2015: Life Church of Rock Run is a Pentecostal church in Joliet, Illinois with an unabashed flair for engaging, contemporary services. Outfit with drums, bass, guitar, keyboards, and plenty of spirit, Life Church rocks its message every Sunday. Knowledgeable in technical matters, the church had acquired a high-performance Danley Sound Labs sound reinforcement system but for budgetary reasons had omitted low-end from the system. Understandably, the church was keen to shore up that omission, and it timed subwoofer installation to correspond with the addition of new seating that would require additional system coverage. The church hired Chicago-based Advanced Systems & Technologies (AST) to design and install the additional coverage and to overhaul the existing system. To Life Church’s existing Danley SH-60 and SH-DFA, AST added two Danley SH-mini loudspeakers for fill, four Danley SM-100M loudspeakers for on-stage monitors, and two thundering Danley TH-115 subwoofers.

“With the new added seating, Life Church can now accommodate approximately four hundred,” said Terry McCarthy, partner and systems specialist with AST. “The church knew they had good speakers but the installation was greatly lacking in proper coverage and tuning. In addition, there was no low end. For our part, we knew we’d be able to get the existing Danley speakers tuned up nicely – the bigger issue was extending coverage and frequency response. Based on their exceptional fidelity and pattern control, it made sense to stick with Danley boxes for the new fills and subwoofers.”

LifeChurch_RockRun_Interior_2The original system is comprised of a single Danley SH-60 for main coverage with a Danley SH-DFA for down-fill, both flown from the main beam of the sanctuary’s A-Frame architecture. In addition to the new coverage the church’s sound system had been pieced together over the years and was in great need of a professional up fit. AST removed all the inadequate cable and outdated components, installed proper wiring, new amplification and several new Danley boxes. Two Danley SH-mini loudspeakers were installed stage left and right. This gives great coverage to the new seating, as well as to areas that were lacking proper coverage from the original install. Two new Danley TH-115 subwoofers were also added providing Life Church with the low-end, fidelity and thump that it was missing. Four new Danley SM-100M loudspeakers give the Pastor, vocalists and musicians the same transcendent experience that was formerly reserved for the house.

AST installed QSC PLX-series amplifiers to provide clean, reliable power. They also installed a Juice Goose power sequencing system to protect the loudspeakers and minimize unnecessary hands turning things on and off. AST also re-tasked an existing Symetrix Jupiter 8×8 DSP and tuned the system to perfection.

“Once all the new gear was installed and tuned we worked closely with the Pastor and worship team to dial everything in. This is a critical element to make an installation complete,” explains McCarthy. “It allows us to see how the system is being used, provide essential training, and it adds an element of personal service that we’ve become known for. The final tuning is done “Live.” This way we can make discreet adjustments during a normal Sunday morning experience. The church leaders, worship team and church members alike all expressed how excellent the system sounds. It was a total win!”

Pastor, Brent A Brosam added, “Life Church of Rock Run purchased our current facility five years ago. After moving in we struggled with some major challenges with our sound. The existing church building was built in the 1960s and not conducive for good sound. After failed attempts to fix the problems, we contacted Terry McCarthy of AST – Advanced Systems & Technologies, to install a Danley system, and I am so glad that we did. With the help provided by the folks at AST & Danley Sound Labs they were able to detect and find proper applications to meet our unique sound challenges. Finally our sound is exactly what we have been looking for to enhance our weekly services. The sound is incredible now. Problems solved!”

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

New Advanced Audio for FIS Alpine Junior World Ski Championships

Lillehammer Norway – Hafjell, Norway is hosting the FIS Alpine Junior World Ski Championships this winter and, with the original sound system installed 20 years ago for the Lillehammer Winter Olympics, the Hafjell Nationalanlegg decided a new system was required. The investment is part of a major overall upgrade of the national slalom slope, financed by the Norwegian government.

Hafjell is located just north of Lillehammer and is one of Norway’s largest ski areas, with a starting point 1030 meters above sea level and a vertical drop of 835 meters. During the Winter Olympics in 1994 it was the venue for the slalom and giant slalom events and is now the national arena and training facility for these disciplines. Following the Olympics, the resort was further developed and currently consists of 30 trails serviced by a cable car, 3 chair lifts and 11 ski lifts. Hafjell and its co-owned neighboring venue together form the largest ski resort in Norway with 73 km of runs.

Design of the new system was handled by Bjørn Fjeld of Norsk Lydteknikk AS and the installation was completed by Lillehammer-based Østbye og Sletmoen. The new system was specified to be designed for the highest quality for speech and music with the possibility of future expansion in mind. With these requirements, the Symetrix Radius was chosen for its studio sound quality and Dante network compatibility. “We chose Community R SERIES loudspeakers based on many years of experience using them on ski slopes across Norway,” said Fjeld. “They provide outstanding audio quality and unequalled reliability in this type of environment. The coverage patterns and throw are also excellent, and critical for accurately covering large outdoor areas.”

Community’s digital FIR filters are programmed into the loudspeaker management module of the Symetrix Radius 12×8 for optimal system performance and the system is powered by Ecler DPA 2000 and DPA1400 amplifiers. Clockaudio mics are used for commentary and announcement.

Fjeld commented, “The original system, considered the best in its time, comprised two massive racks of electronics. One 20U rack with a modern DSP-based loudspeaker system has now replaced that and will provide Hajfell with a system we’re confident will meet their needs for the next 20 years. For the participants and audience alike, the new system also substantially raises the audio quality for their involvement and enjoyment.”

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RH Consulting Whitepaper Predicts “The Death of Analogue and The Rise of Audio Networking”

Portland, OR – February 17, 2015 – RH Consulting has released a new whitepaper examining the current state of the audio networking market and trends among the various audio networking solutions. The independent report, titled “The Death of Analogue and The Rise of Audio Networking,” was commissioned by Audinate and takes a detailed look at the number of audio networking products presently available, the growth rate for various protocols, and the market forces affecting their adoption.

“This whitepaper is the most comprehensive analysis of the audio networking market to date,” states Roland Hemming, principal audio consultant for RH Consulting. “Rather than just focus on technical differences, our goal was to provide a deep dive from the overall market perspective. We analyzed the products that are really shipping and the factors that are driving the growth, or lack thereof, of the various protocols.”

Key takeaways from the whitepaper include:

• Audinate’s Dante audio networking solution has had significant growth in licensees over the last 24 months, nearly 4 times the next largest protocol.
• Over 700 networked audio products are currently available, with the number of Dante-enabled products introduced in the last 12 month significantly outpacing all other networking protocols.
• The number of Dante-enabled products is forecasted to grow by 75% in 2015, and 130% by 2016.

In addition to looking at the total available networked products on the market, RH Consulting examined the factors contributing to the rapid growth of Dante and where audio networking sits on the technology adoption curve.

“Audio networking is following the same pattern as most new technology,” adds Hemming. “The success of Dante is consistent with easy-to-use, end-to-end solutions driving the market when technology is in the early growth phase.” He continues, “Overtime networking has become less about specifying a protocol and more about specifying products that work together.”

The report indicates that the uptake of Dante and audio networking in general is an indication that the market is undergoing a dramatic shift. “History has shown us that when a digital technology comes within 20% of the price of its analogue equivalent, the latter dies,” according to Hemming. “While audio networking is not to that point yet, the rapid growth we are seeing now would indicate that analogue’s days are numbered.”

To download the full whitepaper, visit: www.audinate.com/rise-of-audio-networking

About Roland Hemming
Roland Hemming is a principal audio consultant at RH Consulting, an independent audio consultancy offering system design, compliance, product development and project management services. In his 28-year career he has managed the two largest audio projects in Europe. He has presented papers to the Audio Engineering Society and has been an advisor to InfoComm. He is a regular speaker at industry conferences, a judge for many industry awards and regular author of articles for industry magazines. Roland is a member the AES and ISCE and he sits on the British and European committees for voice alarm systems including EN54 and the IET committee for Connected Systems Integration in Buildings.

About Audinate

forecasted Growth of Dante Enabled Products

forecasted Growth of Dante Enabled Products


Audinate revolutionizes AV systems to enable our customers to thrive in a networked world. Audinate’s Dante media networking technology has been adopted by the leading manufacturers and has become the de facto standard networking technology in the professional audio/visual industry. Dante is used extensively for live performance events, commercial installation, broadcast, recording and production, and communications systems. Audinate offices are located in US, United Kingdom and Australia.

Dante is a trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd, Audinate is a registered trademark of Audinate Pty Ltd.

PRS for Music Installs PMC Speakers In New Listening Room

Steve3 (640x393)

PRS for Music, the organisation that represents over 100,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers, has chosen PMC loudspeakers for the listening room in its new offices in Kings Cross, London.

PRS for Music relocated to Two Pancras Square at the end of 2014. Moving to this prestigious new building gave the organisation the opportunity to create a working environment that was ideally suited to its needs. Part of that process involved installing a dedicated listening room that could be used for any critical listening tasks, including judging entries for the annual Ivor Novello Awards, which celebrate the best British music writing.

PRS for Music director and Music Producers Guild Chairman Steve Levine was responsible for the listening room project and for the choice of PMC monitors. As a multi-platinum music producer, Levine has crafted hits for artists such as The Beach Boys, Culture Club, the Creatures, Gary Moore and Westworld and has won numerous awards including a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year, a Grammy for his work with Deneice Williams and a Sony Radio Award.

“When PRS asked me to oversee the design and build of its new listening room, I want to ensure that it was as good as it could possibly be,” Levine says. “For this reason I insisted that the architects installed a floating floor to prevent reverb issues and that it was as acoustically accurate as possible. The choice of monitors was easy because I already have PMC speakers in my own studio and am therefore familiar with the way they sound and the high quality audio they deliver. PMC speakers are renowned for being exceptionally accurate and that is what I really like about them – the fact that you can hear all the nuances of the music you are listening to and you don’t miss even the tiniest detail.”

As the PRS for Music listening room is compact, PMC recommended twotwo.5 active speakers that are specifically designed for situations where space is at a premium but quality must not be compromised. The smallest members of the twotwo family, these ultra-compact nearfield monitors feature the same technology as their larger siblings allowing them to perform way beyond expectation. Resolution and neutrality is provided by sophisticated DSP, dual power amplifiers, PMC’s new 27mm tweeter and a 140mm (5.5”) bass unit, all housed in an ATL™ labyrinth cabinet. The result is a monitor that delivers exceptional dynamics, musicality and depth of bass despite its small cabinet size.

About PMC
PMC is a UK-based, world-leading manufacturer of loudspeaker systems, the tools of choice in all ultra-critical professional monitoring applications, and also for the discerning audiophile at home, where they provide a transparent window into the recording artist’s original intentions. PMC products use the best available materials and design principles, including the company’s proprietary Advanced Transmission Line (ATL™) bass-loading technology, cutting-edge amplification and advanced DSP techniques to create loudspeakers that present sound and music exactly as it was when first created, with the highest possible resolution, and without coloration or distortion. For more information on our clients and products, see www.pmc-speakers.com.

Renkus-Heinz IC2 a Hidden Gem at University Chapel

 Newport News, VA – February 2015… Christopher Newport University recently took the wraps off its newest addition, the non-denominational Pope Chapel. The 10,000-square-foot building stands at the entrance to the University and includes state-of-the-art audio, video, lighting, and media systems, including a powerful and versatile audio system centered on the digitally steerable IC2 (IC Squared) array from Renkus-Heinz.

Tom Beaudry, Owner and Senior Designer of Chesapeake-based design/build specialists Onyx AudioVisual, worked together with Erik “Ketch” Kelly, audio engineer for CNU’s Ferguson Center for the Arts to design the systems. As Kelly explains, versatility was a key requirement for the new venue’s sound system.

“The chapel is used for meetings and services by various campus religious groups, but also hosts weddings and musical programs, so the system needed to be versatile enough to deliver a wide range of program material,” explains Kelly.

The 350-seat chapel’s stunning Neo-Georgian architecture is beautiful to behold, but notoriously reverberant, making spoken word intelligibility a critical issue, and making it an ideal candidate for a digitally steered array. As Beaudry observes, the IC2 delivered the best of both worlds.

“We needed a high performance, high fidelity, system that could deliver intelligible speech in a highly reverberant space,” explains Beaudry. “The IC2 system gave us the pattern control of a digitally steered array, but with the full range musicality and output power of a point-source array.”

 Just two self-powered IC2-FR cabinets cover the entire room, each hidden behind scrims in two small soffits above and on either side of the stage area. “We basically needed a compact, invisible sound system that was robust and flexible enough to be used for anything, even an occasional rock band,” says Kelly.

In fact, the IC2 system delivered more than enough power, says Beaudry. “We had originally specified two boxes per side, and were a bit apprehensive when we learned that there was only room for one. But we have more than enough volume from just a pair of IC2 cabinets.”

A big test for the system came when the university decided to add a pipe organ to the room. “That was not part of the original design concept for the chapel, and we were a little concerned because of the wide frequency spread of the instrument,” says Kelly. But as Beaudry notes, “the IC2 easily handles the full range and impact of the organ. It really confirmed that we had made the right choice for the room.”

Beaudry concludes, “for a space like Pope Chapel, we had to design a system that delivered great intelligibility as well as the power and performance for a wide range of source material. And it had to have a footprint that was virtually invisible. The Renkus-Heinz IC2 does exactly that – even when you can’t see it.”

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About Renkus-Heinz - Headquartered in Foothill Ranch, California, Renkus-Heinz, Inc. is the worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of audio operations networks, digitally steerable arrays, powered and non-powered loudspeakers, system specific electronics and fully integrated Reference Point Array systems.

Danley’s Massive New Caleb Horn Debuts at the University of Iowa’s Kinnick Stadium

University_Iowa_1IOWA CITY, IOWA – FEBRUARY 2015: The University of Iowa Hawkeyes football team plays all of its home games in the 70,500-seat Kinnick Stadium, which is located on the west side of campus. It is adjacent to residences on one side and to campus buildings on the other side, one of which is the University Hospital. Although it’s fair to say that almost all Iowans stand behind the Hawkeyes (there is no pro team in the state) it’s also true that Iowans who are recovering in the hospital deserve peace and quiet, even on game day. When school officials became disenchanted with the lo-fi sound and poor coverage of Kinnick Stadium’s old sound reinforcement system, they worried that elevating it to modern standards would only increase game day complaints from the hospital. Those worries have been allayed. Kinnick Stadium’s new high-powered Danley Sound Labs system – the first in the world to use the massive Caleb Horn – delivers reference-monitor-quality audio while keeping sound energy in the bowl. The new audio system provides Danley’s famous pattern control, rich low-end, airy high-end, unrivaled speech intelligibility, and prevents appreciable spillover into the adjacent neighborhood and hospital.

“As Hawkeye management and fans traveled to other stadiums, they kept hearing sound systems that were far better than the one they had at home,” said Marvin Smejkal, owner of Sound Concepts (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), the company under retainer with the University for audio system maintenance and operation. “As the complaints mounted, they asked us to research the sound systems in the five best stadiums they had heard. Three of the five were Danley systems, which resonated with my previous experiences involving Tom Danley’s creations – I was a huge fan of his ServoDrive subwoofer back in the 1980s and 1990s. Based on previous experience and a very impressive blind comparison, we recommended a Danley system for Kinnick Stadium.” The design, installation, and commissioning was a collaborative effort by consultant Anthony James Partners (Richmond, Virginia), with input from Sound Concepts and Danley Sound Labs.

“The design of the new sound system presented a number of significant challenges,” said acoustician and Director of Danley University Doug Jones, who designed the speaker system using Danley’s new Direct modeling software. “Architectural considerations ruled out a distributed system, so we were asked to throw sound eight hundred feet across the stadium… without affecting the hospital just beyond. The only way to do that is with highly directional horns, which is Danley’s specialty.”

Although a range of Danley components – including Jericho Horns and BC-415 subwoofers – contribute to coverage of the entire bowl, the real hero in Iowa is Danley’s new Caleb Horn. Measuring ten feet tall by four feet wide by five feet deep, the Caleb Horn delivers precision pattern control to extremely low frequencies and provides seemingly magical coverage of the opposite stands – and little else – at Kinnick Stadium. It is a single, massive horn with 108 drivers (12 x 18-inch drivers, 32 x 6-inch mid-range drivers and 64 x one-inch high-frequency compression drivers, 40 x 15 degree coverage pattern) with a frequency response that extends down to 30Hz.

“Danley’s Caleb Horn is a game changer,” said Larry Lucas, director of audio engineering at Anthony James Partners. “Given the architecture of Kinnick Stadium, the Caleb’s default 15 by 40 degree beam width was perfect to hit the far section, but Danley was willing to modify the horn exit to hit any target we required. Apart from the precision coverage, which extends to vastly lower frequencies than can be obtained with any other solution, the Caleb shares another Danley feature: clean, musical sound without comb filtering or other interference issues.”

Kinnick Stadium is the first project to use Danley’s new freely available Direct modeling software from conception to completion. Unlike other modeling software, Direct makes predictions down to subwoofer frequencies, which allowed Jones to predict the low-frequency interactions around the bowl and, critically, at a point where the stadium is open to the hospital. By carefully adjusting the timing and phasing of the subwoofers relative to the Caleb’s substantial low-frequency content, Jones placed a low-frequency null near the hospital within the Direct software. The predicted null translates to reality; although the crowd will still enjoy abundant bass, the nearby hospital is significantly spared. “In addition to being accurate across the spectrum, Direct is very quick to render and easy to use,” commented Jones.

University_Iowa_2To either side of the Caleb Horn, a Danley J3 Jericho Horn paired with a Danley J4 Jericho picks up the distant sideline seating. The J4 is a highly-directional, high-frequency array of 64 compression drivers that compensates appropriately for atmospheric losses. Mike Hedden, Danley president commented, “The J4 is a very unique product. Sound from 64 compression drivers seamlessly exits the large format horn via a patented combiner system. This allows unprecedented audio quantity and quality to be provided at extremely long distances. The J4 is capable of reproducing audio several octaves higher than the competition, sounds much more natural, covers a larger area, and is a better value.” Another pair of J3 Jericho Horns, one on each side, provide near-throw coverage of the main seating areas. Despite their placement on the scoreboard, which is right above the near end zone seating, Danley’s exceptional pattern control allows them to operate “without liquefying the fans immediately below,” in the choice words of Hedden. Four Danley SH-64s are time-aligned and balanced on the near side to complete the even and consistent audio coverage in the stadium. Adding icing on the cake (for those who love a little bass) are four Danley BC-415 subwoofers that complement the Caleb’s low-end output and can shake the press box windows down to 21Hz. Arranged two tall by two wide, the configuration provides a favorable front-to-back output ratio, again keeping energy in the bowl and off the street. Lab Gruppen amplifiers with integrated Lake processing power the system with nearly 150,000 watts.

“Unlike the stadium’s old system, the new Danley system provides independent zone control,” said Smejkal. “Special events used to be a nightmare because we had to more or less engage the whole system, which added to the noise complaints. Now, we’re able to fire up only certain components of the Danley system. It sounds better, doesn’t waste energy, and keeps the neighbors happy. Even with the entire bowl audio system operating, we found in recent testing that areas around the stadium, where noise complaints used to be frequent, that sound from the stadium is now unmeasurable over ambient background volumes. The reduction in sound spill out of the stadium is truly amazing.”

With the new Danley Caleb Horn paired with six Jericho Horns, four Danley SH-64s, and four BC-415 subwoofers, Kinnick Stadium is capable of SPLs it will never have the opportunity to tap into. But all that sheer muscle – usually taken as the primary measure of a sound system’s mojo – is really just a side effect of the system’s extreme pattern control. “There’s no other way to get that kind of pattern control down to such low frequencies,” said Jones. “That was a huge issue at Kinnick Stadium. As a bonus, they will run the system considerably below its potential, which will keep components cool and extend its lifetime.”

Like other Danley systems, Kinnick Stadium was comparatively easy to commission. “Line array systems involve a huge numbers of boxes, all of which interfere with each other in complicated ways,” continued Jones. “They require delicate aiming, endless tweaking, and plenty of DSP manipulation. Even after all that, the results are never satisfying to an audiophile – they involve huge compromises, especially at larger distances. In stark contrast, we can simply point Danley’s horns where they need to go, and we’re most of the way there. I used only five EQ points for the entire system! We mainly adjusted levels so that the small overlap zones were consistent. The whole process took only six hours.”

Kinnick stadium currently houses the best point source, long throw audio system ever assembled, until the next Danley Sound Labs innovation again changes the playing field.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABSDanley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology. www.danleysoundlabs.com

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