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GO AV Adds UDC 400 from High Resolution Systems for Control of Blackmagic Design’s 2ME ATEM Switcher

High Resolution Systems’ UDC software-based Universal Device Controller (UDC) and UDC 400 is delivering additional functionality to GO AV’s Rudy Tessmer who’s taking advantage of UDC support of Blackmagic Design products to automate his Blackmagic Design 2ME ATEM production switcher.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, GO AV provides video engineering and video equipment rentals for corporate events. It acquired UDC when compatibility with Blackmagic Design devices was introduced. UDC’s support of Blackmagic Design products offers Tessmer an easy and cost-effective way to automate his switcher and control an array of other equipment.

“For the same price as buying Blackmagic’s remote panel, which controls only the switcher, I invested in UDC, which allows me to control the switcher and PlaybackPro, record with my Ki Pros, and turn my projectors on and off or put them into patterns — all with one device: That’s very powerful,” Tessmer says. “It also gives me an unlimited ability to build macros and presets so I can create a look with the hit of a button.”

Tessmer has done six shows for the financial and insurance and IT sectors since taking delivery of UDC in May. “UDC makes my ATEM look like a high-end switcher with automation and recall ability,” he says. “UDC is easy to use, customizable and adds value to my switcher package. Using UDC with my Blackmagic ATEM switcher gives me the abilities of a more expensive switcher at a price I can afford. And I get additional device control – all in one tool.”

High Resolution Systems known as HRS Control is a company with a strong systems engineering and applications background. Its founders have decades of experience in the audio visual rental and staging industry, broadcast applications, A/V installations and system design. This combined experience allows them to provide the highest possible quality solutions to its customers in the most efficient manner. For more information, visit www.hrscontrol.com.

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JOEL HAMILTON RECORDS AND MIXES “PUSS N BOOTS” DEBUT USING ATC SCM25A’s

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – AUGUST 2014: Puss n Boots is a three-piece, all-female, alt-country band led by singer-songwriter Norah Jones and backed by accomplished vocalists Sasha Dobson and Catherine Popper. All three women learned new instruments for five years before recording their debut album with engineer/musician/producer Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Black Keys, Sparklehorse, Elvis Costello) at Studio G Brooklyn. Titled No Fools, No Fun, the album was recently released on Blue Note Records. As co-owner of Studio G Brooklyn with Tony Maimone, Hamilton installed ATC SCM25A three-way reference monitors and ATC SCM0.1-15 subwoofers in Studio A, a change that happily coincided with his first Grammy nomination (Pretty Lights, A Color Map of the Sun), a Latin Grammy nomination (Bomba Estereo, Elegancia Tropical), and a Latin Grammy win (Gaby Moreno, Postales). The ATCs were purchased from Audio Power Tools in New York.

“The ATCs have changed the way I work and improved the quality of my work,” said Hamilton. “I’m lucky to have a nicely tuned control room with an SSL and plenty of vintage outboard gear, and with the ATCs, I’m suddenly able to make decisions that are smaller – and yet more critical – than I have ever been able to make before. I have the ability to resolve a finer shade of the colors I’m hurling at the end-listener, and it’s been a revelation. It’s not a small thing, and that’s why I’m reaching for dramatic words like that. It’s tectonic. The entire continent has shifted.”

The glorious harmonies delivered by Jones, Dobson and Popper are a huge part of Puss n Boots’ magic. They form the emotional foreground. “The balance of those harmonies is crucial,” said Hamilton. “You’ve got these three gorgeous women with gorgeous voices, and they’re all coming at you like gangbusters because they can all project. We recorded everything live to analog tape, including the vocals. That gives a particular nuance to how the instruments sit against the vocals. You can feel the beat push and pull so beautifully. I needed to make sure that all of that nuance would come shining through for the listener. Striking the right midrange balance of those harmonies is critical, and I had to make sure all of that beauty would be immediately apparent to, say, my mom!”

While Norah Jones’ existing albums might safely be described as “polished” and most classic country albums might safely be described as “rough,” Hamilton had to walk the line between those extremes. “The balance is deliberately raw, which is perhaps unexpected by traditional Norah Jones standards, but it also has to be informed,” he said. “We were shooting for a tiny bulls eye, but we also had to make sure that everything felt unfettered and natural; just on the edge of scratchy so that it felt rough but didn’t actually hurt people. With the ATCs, I could find that line and make adjustments with confidence. I could tell where I was overcooking it on purpose. I could dial in just the right amount of ‘road house.’”

With the introduction of the ATCs, gone too is the need to translate for the client how a mix will sound outside of the studio. “After spending a lot of time in front of other monitors, I could tell when certain things would sound bad in the studio but fine outside of the studio,” Hamilton said. “The challenge beyond that, however, was convincing the client that those bad things would be fine later on, which is just one more thing to heap onto the already-skittish nature of an attended mix session. And so clients would ask, ‘why don’t you just get monitors that sound like it will sound like?’ It seems so simple, but of course it’s not.”

Hamilton used to switch between a number of monitors and loudspeakers all day long, but now he just hangs out on the ATCs. Depending on the task at hand, he can turn the ATC subwoofer on or not. “With the sub on and the volume cracked, the ATCs rock and serve as ‘mains,’” he said. “When I’m listening closely and resolving small moves, the ATCs are my nearfields. Either way, I now have complete confidence in what I’m hearing and doing. When a mix sounds good on the ATCs, I know it will sound good everywhere else. With Puss n Boots, we were able to make solid decisions that stuck. We totally avoided the hell of endless revisions!”

ABOUT TRANSAUDIO GROUP TransAudio Group, founded by industry veteran Brad Lunde, has quickly become the premier U.S. importer/distributor and/or U.S. sales and marketing representative for high-end audio. Success hinges on TransAudio providing dealers and end users with a higher standard of product expertise and support far beyond the norm.

www.transaudiogroup.com

METRIC HALO GEAR NO MYTH FOR FOH ENGINEER SUNE SNELLMAN JAKOBSEN

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK – AUGUST 2014: Sune Snellman Jakobsen is a live mix engineer stationed in Copenhagen, Denmark whose credits include world tours with The Raveonettes, Mew, Mercury Rev from NY, Kashmir from Denmark, and, most recently, Trentemøller. An avid Metric Halo user, Jakobsen owns a ULN-8 interface and a LIO-8 interface and regularly uses their SpectraFoo sound analysis software to set up shows and to help identify and solve problems while mixing. His interfaces carry Metric Halo’s optional +DSP, which allows him to run their powerful plug-ins on critical live channels (including the whole mix!).

Jakobsen’s entry into the industry was not so worldly, nor so high-tech, but it set him on the right path. “I became interested in audio as a member of the underground punk scene in Copenhagen during my teenage years,” he said. “I played guitar in punk bands and hung out in a punk club where some older guys taught me the basics of mixing consoles, multi-way speaker systems, stage monitors, and all that. Neither the bands nor the audience cared too much about fidelity or clarity, so I could mix shows night-after-night and no one complained about my dreadful mixes. It was hard on the ears but good practice for a novice.”

One of Jakobsen’s punk rock mentors recommended him for a job with one of Denmark’s leading PA companies, and he spent the next several years prepping outboard racks, packing house-boxes for rentals, driving trucks, rigging PAs, and patching microphones on tours and festival stages. “The whole time I was looking over the shoulders of all the experienced and skilled monitor and FOH engineers,” he said. “I soon moved from rigging and miking to actually operating the boards, which was exciting. I got pretty good at mixing monitors, and I was able to mix FOH for a few up-and-coming acts.”

As his skills and industry contacts grew, more bands hired Jakobsen to engineer their shows, prompting him to make the move to full-time freelance. After some years of regional touring with local bands, he signed on to a worldwide tour with The Raveonettes. “The band had just landed a major label deal and had a lot of hype going so we went back and forth from European to U.S. club tours and festivals,” he said. “We performed on the Late Show with David Letterman a few times, Conan, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, numerous radio sessions, and support-tours with Depeche Mode, Interpol, The Strokes, Supergrass and many others. Those support tours were great because they gave me new opportunities to learn from great live engineers.” When The Raveonettes finally took a break after six years of constant touring, Jakobsen signed on with Mew and, later, Trentemøller.

“As a FOH engineer, I think it’s important to embrace the sonic ideals of the artist,” Jakobsen said. “I don’t see any point in applying my own favorite flavor if it doesn’t appeal to the artist. Along those lines, it’s critical to build a relationship of trust so the artist feels I have an understanding and appreciation of what their music should sound like. It was an interesting transition to go from The Raveonettes’ minimal, noisy, and reverb-y soundscape to Mew’s big sonic universe, with big pounding drums and layers of pads, guitars, and backing vocals.” Although still working with Mew, Jakobsen began touring with Trentemøller in 2010, which took him to European arenas in support of Depeche Mode, 3,000-seat headlining gigs, and plenty of European festivals. “I’m still fascinated by the way a good mix can lift a music experience (and how a bad mix can ruin a show), and I’m still intrigued by how difficult it is to reinforce audio and to mix,” he said. “I like the combination of creativity, technical skills, and science. It’s an ongoing learning experience, and that’s cool.”

SETTING UP THE SHOW
Jakobsen seldom has more than a short window to load in, set up, check the PA, and sound check before doors open. One of the first things he addresses is the PA system performance: “The frequency response should be full range and both level and response should be as uniform as possible throughout the audience area. I use Metric Halo SpectraFoo sound analysis software on most every gig to analyze and help tune the PA system.” He typically sends pink noise to one side of the PA, feeds the same signal to SpectraFoo’s Transfer Function source channel, places his Earthworks M30 measuring mic somewhere on-axis, and feeds its output to the Transfer Function response channel. He then time aligns the two signals with SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder and takes a snapshot of the response. He repeats this process with the mic at several other locations – a little farther or closer, and on or off axis. He marks the snapshots in SpectraFoo’s overlay list and asks it to calculate an average.

“That,” he said, “is then my visual reading of the system. I immediately get an idea of the PA at hand and whether it’s reasonably linear or not. Sometimes I’ll spot an issue even before I listen to music. For example if there’s a broad dip in the 1k-6k range it could indicate the gain settings in the system crossover aren’t right and the hi-mid drivers are gained too low. Or a dip at the crossover frequency of the sub and the low-mid could indicate phase or timing issues with the subs. It’s of course important to listen to reference music and tune with the ears in addition to the SpectraFoo output, but the visual plot is a great help in locating problem frequencies.” He uses SpectraFoo’s Delay Finder along with the phase response of the Transfer Function to time-align subwoofers, fills, and delay speakers if necessary. During sound check, he uses its Correlation Meter and Phase Torch to verify phasing between sources (e.g. bass DI and bass mic). Ringing the system with Spectragraph allows him to quickly identify and notch out problem frequencies with the Metric Halo EQ plug-in.

MIXING THE SHOW
Jakobsen described his mix philosophy: “The mix itself must complement the music and should hopefully impress and overwhelm the audience. All of the instruments should be well-defined within the mix. Vocals should almost always be on top of the mix, and lyrics should be audible. I tend to favor ‘wall of sound’ mixes, with gaps in the soundscape filled by anything available from stage, perhaps by mixing guitar parts up very close to the vocal or adding lush reverb to drums or percussion. I like to be overwhelmed by sound when I’m in the audience, so I aim to do the same when I’m mixing. I think one key to an interesting mix is to feature supporting roles as much as lead roles, be it a rhythm guitar or a tambourine or whatever; I think it helps keep people’s attention when all the different roles are well defined.”

Jakobsen uses his Metric Halo ULN-8 and LIO-8 along with the free Metric Halo MIO Console control software as an audio “multi-tool.” MIO Console allows him to route signals and to operate the DSP resources he has installed on the interfaces. With Trentemøller, he reserves the Metric Halo gear for the tracks that need the most processing: vocals, kick drum and snare drum. “I’m not aware of any other interface that has the combination of such great-sounding preamps, transparent converters, sublime mix bus processing, and all of the DSP tools necessary: unlimited bands of precise EQs, compression, limiting, delay, and ‘character’ modeling. At the same time, it gives me a straightforward interface for recording and playback.”

For vocals, Jakobsen uses Metric Halo’s “Classic British Mic Pre” character, followed by a “MIOstrip” loaded with a six-band EQ for sweetening, two compressors with complementary fast and slow settings, a second six-band EQ for notching out problem frequencies, and a very fast compressor with a side chain high-passed at 5kHz to serve as a de-esser. “In addition, I use the ‘California Vocal Box’ character on the vocal’s master strip, which I find adds a nice grainy texture,” he said. “For the current tour, Trentemøller asked for a vocal distortion for a few songs. I made a virtual MIO channel and tried different combinations of the Pedal and Amp macros. I ended up with a combination of the ‘Screamer’ into the ‘MHClean’ with some delay and a lot of compression and EQ. It sounds great!”

Jakobsen uses similar processing for the kick and snare drum. ” I almost always mix drums into a group and insert a stereo ULN-8 or LIO-8 input, split that into two stereo channel strips in MIO Console – one with no processing (or perhaps just Metric Halo’s Transient Designer) and one with a hard squashing compressor, Transient Designer, and often a bit of soft clip to give the drums an edgy character,” he said. “Those channels sum to a stereo output that’s a killer parallel compression drum group insert. I even have the option to add different characters to the drum group, for example the ‘Soft-Saturation’ character for a fatter and more punchy sound, and I have an EQ on the output bus that allows me to cut boomy frequencies in the low end or add high-end brilliance on the fly.”

Finally, Jakobsen sends the entire mix into a stereo MIO Console channel that gets routed to two auxiliary groups, one with “SoftSat” Character applied and one without. “I can then mix between these two depending on the PA system of the day,” he said. “It’s like having a wet/dry control on the SoftSat Character, which can really make the PA system sound like it’s ‘in your face.’ Then I route that mix to multiple master busses with different EQs and delays for the main PA, the subs, fills, and delays.” During the performance, Jakobsen keeps SpectraFoo open with a Level Meter on the house sound, a Spectragram and a Spectragraph on the mix bus, and a Spectragraph on the solo bus for quickly diagnosing problems with individual channels. “It’s especially helpful for getting the low-end even. If I hear a boomy note in the bass, it’s easy to identify with SpectraFoo,” he concluded.

ABOUT METRIC HALO Now based in the sunny city of Safety Harbor, Florida, Metric Halo provides the world with high-resolution metering, analysis, recording and processing solutions with award-winning software and future-proof hardware.

www.mhlabs.com

Florida Baptist Church Converts (A/D) with Symetrix

OCALA, FLORIDA – AUGUST 2014: The sound system at Trinity Baptist Church in Ocala, Florida is quite sophisticated for a sanctuary that seats approximately 800 congregants. It delivers left-center-right imaging to nearly every seat from multiple loudspeaker positions, including six time-delayed left-center-right zones that cover the areas farthest from the pulpit. This system was installed by Pro Sound & Video in 2004 and although the loudspeakers and amplifiers have held up well, the original DSP processing system that performed the complex routing and filtering did not. Florida-based Pro Sound & Video, Inc. replaced the original processing system with two Symetrix Radius 12×8 Dante™ network audio DSPs and augmented their sixteen combined outputs with two SymNet xOut 12 audio output expansion boxes. All of the units network seamlessly via Dante and replace all of the old analog processing, with plenty of processing power to spare for improvements.

“The system at Trinity Baptist is really nice with almost every seat getting a left-center-right experience,” said Michael Frazee, project manager with Pro Sound & Video. “However, the old processing system was based on a system of five digital processors that were cross wired with analog and AES patches to share various signals between the processors. This worked well for a long time, but one of the main processors went bad, and since the original components are out of production, it became clear that a new system would be required. To say the least, the Symetrix new generation of open architecture, Dante networking processors would afford us a considerable amount of signal handling flexibility to handle the complex processing tasks required for the multi-zone LCR system.”

The required processing includes equalization, distribution, and crossovers for the various speaker zones, which are comprised of the main house system, distributed LCR systems, stage monitors, and additional recording and general distribution mixes. Two Radius 12×8 DSP and two xOut 12 audio output expansion units form one integrated processing network via Dante with 24 inputs and 40 outputs. Programming the system, despite its complexity, was straightforward using Symetrix’ Composer software. “Circumstances in this case necessitated my involvement at the programming level. The Composer software was very predictable, but when I ran into a few snags, I contacted the tech staff at Symetrix, and they were very helpful in resolving programming issues.”

ABOUT SYMETRIX Symetrix is dedicated to making life sound better. As a world leader in the development and manufacturing of digital audio signal processing (DSP) systems and accessories, Symetrix provides best in class audio management solutions to businesses, schools, non-profits and government organizations.

For more information on Symetrix products visit www.symetrix.co

WIND OVER THE EARTH ADDS AN API 1608 TO ITS DEMO ROOM STUDIO

BOULDER, COLORADO – AUGUST 2014: Situated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Wind Over the Earth (WOTE) offers recording sessions for local bands, singer/songwriters, and voice-overs, as well as post-production and training services within its demo studios. It doesn’t promote itself as a commercial studio, but rather uses its space as a base of knowledge to be shared with the community. As a longtime user of API gear, WOTE has now commissioned an in-house 1608 console to offer real world knowledge and applications to its customers.

“Jumping into the 1608 is something we wanted to do for quite some time,” stated Mark Venezia, studio manager at WOTE. “The classic sound of API is something WOTE has been advocating for years, so when we were making the decision to install a console, the 1608 was the right fit.”

Since the commissioning, the 1608’s headroom, imaging, and overall depth of sound have made an immediate impact. “The 1608 has brought us up to another level of visibility,” shared Venezia. “It has made our life that much easier. The work flow on everything we do is smoother.”

Part of what makes the 1608 a success at WOTE is the setup. “We have everything wired into four bays as of right now, and the ease of use revealed itself in our first session. We custom-build all of our cables here at WOTE, and the last two 1608 consoles we have sold have included custom wiring packages for specific client needs,” explained Venezia. “In each case, customers who have been in our demo room learned first-hand the ease of use. The versatility of moving modules around is nice as well.”

With some post-production projects, recording sessions, and a series of live shows using the 1608 already complete, WOTE is eager to pursue further trainings. “We are putting together a series of master’s mixing seminars, where we will be flying out some high-profile engineers for an evening of knowledge sharing in the mixing environment. We love hosting seminars like this, as community is our number one priority,” shared Venezia. Part of the glue that holds all the future works together is the knowledge WOTE is able to pair with the gear it offers. “The 1608 is the centerpiece of the room, and everything is based around it.”

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and the BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

HARD HIT BY SANDY, LONG BEACH HIGH SCHOOL REBUILDS ATHLETIC FIELD USING ASHLY AUDIO

LIDO BEACH, NEW YORK – AUGUST 2014: Long Beach High School is situated on a barrier island on the southern side of New York’s Long Island, where it received a terrific pounding from Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012. For more than a year afterward, student athletes had to pass the trashed and unusable athletic field as other rebuilding efforts took precedence. The job would be large. In addition to rebuilding the field itself, the school had to replace the field’s fatally damaged sound reinforcement system. Installed by Advance Sound of Farmingdale, New York, the new system centers on an Ashly ne24.24M modular processor and two Ashly ne8250 eight-channel amplifiers. Advance Sound installed a similar system at Long Beach Middle School prior to Hurricane Sandy, and that system weathered the fateful storm and remains functional to this day.

“Long Beach High School was very hard hit by Sandy,” said Thomas DePace, chief operations officer at Advance Sound. “The wind, the sand, and the water turned what was once a grassy field into a swampland. The goal of this rebuilding effort was to prevent such loss to a future storm. We’ve had great success with the robustness of Ashly gear, so that was easy to specify. In addition, the school wanted to move to a more distributed system to avoid noise conflicts with neighbors that had been a source of some tension with the old end zone-fired system. We needed a lot of amplifier channels, and Ashly’s two-rack space, eight-channel ne8250 filled that need perfectly.”

Inputs to the system include a CD player, an iPod input, and a handful of wired and wireless microphones, all of which feed an Ashly ne24.24M modular processor outfitted with eight analog inputs and twelve analog outputs. Two Ashly ne8250 amplifiers deliver sixteen 250W channels to drive six bi-amped One Systems 212CIM loudspeakers and a collection of indoor loudspeakers for the press booth. The 212CIMs are weatherproof, and Advance Sound was allowed to install each speaker on its own dedicated sound pole. Thus, coverage was not constrained by the locations of existing structures, and the SPL at the adjacent residences is significantly lower than with the previous system.

“With an eight-fader Ashly RD-8C remote control, the new system is also very easy and intuitive for the non-technical staff to operate,” said DePace. “That’s important because we’re an hour away from the school, and troubleshooting on game day is not something we want to be engaged in. With the RD-8C, all they have to do is turn the fader up for the input they’d like to hear. That’s as easy and repeatable as it gets!”

ABOUT ASHLY AUDIO Ashly Audio Inc. is recognized as a world leader in the design and manufacturing of high quality & high performance signal processing equipment and power amplification for use in the commercial sound contracting and professional audio markets. The 40-year old company is headquartered in Webster, New York U.S.A. 

www.ashly.com

L.A.’s CHALICE RECORDING GETS DOWN WITH DANLEY

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA – AUGUST 2014: The client list at Chalice Recording Studio in Hollywood, California is so extensive that it is challenging to think of a celebrity who is not on it. For example, the “B” section includes the Backstreet Boys, Barbara Streisand, Beastie Boys, Justin Bieber, Beyoncé, the Black Eyed Peas, Blink 182, and Britney Spears and the “P” section includes Paris Hilton, Perry Farrell, Prince, and Puff Daddy. Those clients use Chalice Recording Studio as the medium through which they turn ideas into platinum albums and Grammy Awards. So Chalice is always humming – almost literally – with the next big thing. Because top-volume monitoring (think 120dB+) and deep, authentic bass at those extreme SPLs have become so critical to so many hip-hop and top-40 artists, engineers, and producers, Chalice Recording Studio has installed Danley Sound Labs TH-115 subwoofers in studios A and B.

“Before we installed the Danley subs, we were blowing our subwoofer drivers once or twice a week,” said Lowell Pickett, head studio tech at Chalice. “It’s because the monitoring volume is often really extreme; more and more, our clients are using the main system to gauge the music’s impact at club volumes. It’s a visceral thing – they want to feel it as much as hear it. Anyway, I did some research, and more than one person suggested that I check out Danley.”

Compared with conventional designs, Danley Sound Labs’ patented Tapped Horn (TH) subwoofer technology delivers deeper low-end extension, a more even frequency response, and much lower distortion. Indeed, few people understand how distorted conventional subwoofers are until they hear a Danley Tapped Horn subwoofer. To help make their decision, the Chalice staff A/B’d the Danley TH-115s against their existing big-name subwoofers in Studio A.

“The Danley subs were way, way better,” Pickett said flatly. “Previously, there was no place in the room where the bass seemed focused. With these subs, I could really hear what was going on in most places in the room. Everything tightened up and became clearer, and our low end got even lower.” “There’s a magic that happens when the Danley subwoofers at Chalice pair up with the full-range system,” added Kenny Andrews, the area Danley rep. “It’s a very musical sound.”

As part of the Danley installation, Chalice did something very few studios are willing to do (yet). They put the entire monitoring signal through a Danley DSLP48 digital processor, which provided clean crossovers, as well as flexible equalization and filtering for tuning the room. “We were nervous,” Pickett admitted. “We had previously used high-end analog crossovers and equalizers. This was a jump, but everyone agrees it has been all up side and no down side. The sound is as transparent as ever, and the uniform channel processing has tightened up the stereo imaging. The DSLP48′s equalizers are great and have helped the acousticians who tune the room.” As a bonus, Chalice uses the DSLP48 to provide different presets to different clients.

Output from the Danley DSLP48 feeds a Danley DSLA3.3K dual-channel amplifier, which in turn powers the two Danley TH-115 subwoofers. The processor output also feeds the existing full-range system, an Augspurger GA215H with 15-inch TAD 1601 B woofers and TAD 4002 beryllium compression drivers. All the loudspeaker components, as well as the Danley TH-115 subwoofers, are soffit mounted.

“Our clients noticed the improvement right away, and we stopped replacing subwoofer drivers on a weekly basis,” said Pickett. “With the Danleys, the volume can be so great that the light fixtures fall from the ceiling! That really tickles the clients!” With Studio A booked out completely, Chalice made the same change in Studio B. Now Studio B has a pair of Danley TH-115s, backed by additional Danley processing and amplification.

ABOUT DANLEY SOUND LABS Danley Sound Labs is the exclusive home of Tom Danley, one of the most innovative loudspeaker designers in the industry today and recognized worldwide as a pioneer for “outside the box” thinking in professional audio technology.

www.danleysoundlabs.com

Electrosonic Provides AV Expertise to New Discovery Park of America

Discovery Park of America has opened in Union City, Tennessee, offering visitors a world-class entertainment and educational experience with more than 70,000-square feet of exhibits on nature, science, technology, history and art. Electrosonic provided audio-visual equipment for most of the ten exhibit galleries in the three-level space of the new Discovery Center.

The primary benefactor of Discovery Park of America is the Robert E. and Jenny D. Kirkland Foundation, which has donated approximately $80 million to the creation of the park and endowed a program for its continuing operational support and expansion. As long-time supporters of education in the area, the Kirklands have given Discovery Park the mission of enhancing the educational experiences of children and adults, and inspiring them to see beyond their current level of knowledge.

The Discovery Center’s diverse array of galleries include Children’s Exploration with fun Water Works experiments; Natural History with a number of dinosaur specimens; Regional History with a 20,000-gallon aquarium; and Transportation featuring 60 years of the American automobile.

Fabricators Maltbie, a kubik company, brought Electrosonic aboard at the new attraction. Electrosonic has partnered with Maltbie on a number of projects over the years.

The simulation theater in the Regional History gallery gives visitors a taste of what it was like to experience an earthquake along the New Madrid fault, which formed nearby Reelfoot Lake in the northwest area of Tennessee some 200 years ago. Electrosonic installed 270º wraparound screens and five ceiling-mounted Christie DS+6K-M projectors to deliver the visuals sourced from a 7thSense server. Special effects audio and tremors simulate the earthquake for the standing audience.

In the Native Americans gallery, a holographic storyteller recounts the legends and beliefs of the area’s indigenous people. Electrosonic furnished four 46-inch LCD monitors for the exhibit, which brings the mythical figure to life with a Pepper’s Ghost effect.

Electrosonic also provided many Samsung 32- and 55-inch LCD displays for the galleries along with Innovox Audio speakers for individual exhibits. The entire facility is controlled by a Medialon system programmed by Electrosonic.

Electrosonic located the equipment room on the middle level of Discovery Center, which made cable pulls more efficient. The equipment room is at capacity, but two additional equipment rooms are available above and below the main equipment room. Conduits connect the rooms for easy expansion as needed.

About Electrosonic
Electrosonic, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an international audio-visual company that creates tailored, state-of-the-art solutions for a wide range of markets including theme parks, museums, control rooms, and corporate meeting rooms. Since its founding in 1964, Electrosonic has built a strong reputation for working on complex projects, both large and small, and has developed lasting partnerships with customers and suppliers. Beyond complete integrated systems, Electrosonic provides a comprehensive scope of services including technical design, projector lamp sales, maintenance and operational support.

Learn more about Electrosonic. Visit http://www.electrosonic.com

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DPA Microphones Was The Impresario Of Aspen Opera Theater Center

Collection of company’s mics were on hand for recording at Wheeler Opera House during the Aspen Music Festival and School

ASPEN, CO, AUGUST 19, 2014 – Every year, professional and aspiring classical musicians and technical personnel from around the world head to the mountains of Colorado for an eight-week summer intensive retreat at the Aspen Music Festival and School. As the country’s premier classical music program, the festival presents more than 300 performances and music education events, including the Aspen Opera Theater Center (AOTC) program at the historic Wheeler Opera House, where DPA Microphones had its chance to shine.

The AOTC relied on the d:dicate™ 4006C Omnidirectional, 4011A Cardioid and 4015C Wide Cardioid Microphones, as well as the d:vote™ 4099 Instrument Microphone 10-piece Classic Touring Kit for their pristine recording capabilities. Supplied by DPA, Inc. — the company’s U.S. branch, these mics were used primarily to record and broadcast AOTC’s Saturday morning opera master classes as well as its fully-staged productions of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin and Bizet’s Carmen.

“We were looking for a clean and accurate sound,” explains Scott Burgess, head audio engineer for the Aspen Music Festival and School. “The DPA mics are spotless and precise, and could handle the dynamic range of an operatic performance.”

Since the AOTC is a training program for professional singers, the music was not amplified for the live audience. However, Burgess still needed to ensure that the broadcast audiences, recording listeners and guests in the green rooms all had the same audio experience as the live attendees. He selected the d:dicate 4006s to pick up the vocals from across the front of the stage, a pair of d:dicate 4015s arranged for the main orchestra, a pair of d:dicate 4011s in the wind section and the d:vote 4099s to accent the orchestra’s string section. This guaranteed a pure sound for all recordings and radio broadcasts, including those aired on the local NPR station.

“Another big appeal of the d:dicates and the d:votes was their small size,” adds Burgess. “We could put them where we wanted without having visual distractions, as we needed to stay out of the way of the performances that took place.”

Burgess also arranged d:votes inside the piano to feed sound to the students during the master classes. “The flexibility and sound of the d:votes proved invaluable for the Saturday classes, especially since the piano was constantly being moved in and out of the pit,” he continues. “DPA’s unique magnetic clip design saved us a lot of time as the mics can easily be placed in and out of the piano.”

In addition to the traditional uses, Burgess also called on his d:dicate 4011s to amplify the percussion section for the July performances of Lowell Liebermann’s The Picture of Dorian Gray into the theater through a pair of powered speakers. “We weren’t able to record Dorian Gray, for contractual reasons, but we still needed mics during these performances,” he explains. “Since the show had an especially large orchestra, we were unable to fit the percussion in the theater. Instead, they had to perform from a side room where we set up an ORTF pair of DPA 4011s, which allowed us to amplify the sound of the percussion back into the theater using a standard PA speaker system. It was an astoundingly convincing method as audiences could scarcely tell that the percussionists were not in the theater. The conductor was happy with it and it worked really well for everyone.”

Though the AOTC had not used the newer DPA mics before, it was essential to Burgess, who started with the festival in 2011, to be able to hit the ground running. “The space can be a little challenging and usually I have to make some modifications, but the DPA mics worked right off the bat,” he says. “We only had to make very minor adjustments to get a really good sound.”

Working with professional companies, such as DPA Microphones, has proven indispensible to Burgess and the students. “Our staff comes from all around the country, from some of the biggest recording programs where they are taught on a variety of equipment,” he says. “Having companies like DPA Microphones as one of the sponsors is a great way for our students, and even our professionals, to work with the best professional audio equipment on the market, which is a really important part of our program.”

Founded in 1949, The Aspen Music Festival and School is held annually each summer, with this year’s run ending on August 17. The three AOTC operas presented each summer feature AOTC singers and distinguished conductors and directors. Additionally, all members of the AOTC are expected to sing in one opera chorus and to provide technical-support hours during events such as vocal chamber music performances, house concerts and the weekly public Opera Scenes Master Classes. AOTC singers also participate in an intensive curriculum of weekly voice lessons, and classes focused on opera music, acting, song repertory, movement, rehearsals, Alexander Technique and auditioning, among other requirements.

ABOUT DPA:
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high-quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to always provide its customers with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for all its markets, which include live sound, installation, recording, theatre and broadcast. When it comes to the design process, DPA takes no shortcuts. Nor does the company compromise on its manufacturing process, which is done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability and, above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound.

For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com

Kreative Teknik AB Illuminates Ullevi Stadium’s Iconic Pillars with HARMAN’s Martin Exterior 400 Wash Lights

GOTHENBURG, Sweden — As one of the largest arenas in the Nordic region, Sweden’s Ullevi Stadium recently completed a renovation that increased its capacity from 54,000 to 75,000 people featuring 43,000 seats with another 32,000 in standing room. Located in the Swedish city of Gothenburg, the outdoor arena was inaugurated in 1958 when the country hosted one of the world’s most prestigious soccer competitions. However, as the stadium has aged it has undergone a series of renovations, the first in 1985 when the stadium’s iconic concrete pillars on either side of the main entrance were reinforced. Further renovations in 2004 brought Swedish lighting design firm Kreative Teknik AB on board to light the pillars and recently the company retrofitted their original design with six of HARMAN’s Martin Professional Exterior 400 light fixtures.

Each pillar features three Exterior 400 fixtures mounted over 200 feet or 65 meters above the ground, shining both up and down to ensure the entire length is evenly covered. The lighting is controlled by a CueServer-system via DMX that allows for the facility manager to easily change the appearance through a simple click on the touchscreen or by a pre-programmed calendar.

Martin’s Exterior 400 now produces a much brighter and crisper light with more saturated colors when compared to the earlier models Kreative Teknik installed back in 2004. Today, the Exterior 400 line boasts a brighter light with lower power consumption of 139 W, down from the 575 W of its predecessor. Additionally, the fixture’s advanced LED technology limits downtime and maintenance costs while increasing the life span from 2,000 hours to 40,000 hours.

“Once again Martin’s fixtures were the best choice and we are extremely proud of the result of this project,” said Marcus Persson, CEO and Owner of Kreative Teknik AB. “We chose Martin because of their well-documented quality of outdoor fixtures in installations and their exceptional ability to support us with spare-part handling.”

The lighting concept was designed to allow the city’s population to know what type of event was being held inside the venue, such as blue and white washes over the pillars to signal a soccer match for the local team. The color-changing technology and rugged design of the Martin Exterior 400 made it a clear choice for Kreative Teknik.

“The technology has changed drastically since we first installed a number Martin’s Exterior 200 and 600 at the stadium,” said Persson. “Almost a decade has passed and Martin’s been a proven innovator in LED technology, energy-efficiency, RA-index and fixture design. The Exterior 400 is a great example of their ability to provide designers with advanced technology to empower their creative visions.”

For more information on the Martin Exterior 400 wash light, please visit: http://www.martin.com/product/product.asp?product=exterior400

As a world leader in the creation of dynamic lighting solutions for the entertainment, architectural, and commercial sectors, Martin lighting and video systems are renowned the world over. Martin also offers a range of advanced lighting controllers and media servers, as well as a complete line of smoke machines as a complement to intelligent lighting. Martin operates the industry’s most complete and capable distributor network with local partners in nearly 100 countries. Founded in 1987 and based in Aarhus, Denmark, Martin is the lighting division of global infotainment and audio company HARMAN International Industries. For more information please visit: http://www.martin.com.

HARMAN (www.harman.com) designs, manufactures and markets premier audio, visual, infotainment and integrated control solutions for the automotive, consumer and professional markets. With leading brands including AKG®, Harman Kardon®, Infinity®, JBL®, Lexicon® and Mark Levinson ®, the Company is admired by audiophiles, musicians and the entertainment venues where they perform. More than 25 million automobiles on the road today are equipped with HARMAN audio and infotainment systems. HARMAN has a workforce of approximately 16,000 people across the Americas, Europe, and Asia and reported sales of $5.3 billion for the twelve months ended June 30, 2014.

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