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DPA Microphones Gets a Dose of Reality on Rising Star

New live results TV singing competition relies on company’s d:dicate™ 4017 Shotgun and system of d:screet™ 4061 Miniatures with Wisycom transmitters and receivers

LOS ANGELES, JULY 8, 2014 – When Daniel S. McCoy, CAS, scored the sound supervisor role for ABC’s new live results singing show, Rising Star, he knew he would need an innovative miking solution to support the performances. In addition to his tried-and-trusted d:dicate™ 4017 Shotgun Mic from DPA Microphones, McCoy also relies on his new DPA d:screet™ 4061 Omnidirectional Miniature Mics with Wisycom wideband transmitters and receivers.

With behind-the-scenes competitor interviews, commentary from host Josh Groban and mentoring from the likes of Ludacris, Kesha and Brad Paisley, Rising Star incorporates significant moments of dialogue in addition to the performances. In order to account for the show’s various ENG and reality needs, McCoy simultaneously uses the d:dicate 4017 and d:screet 4061s to give the post production team the ultimate choice in audio dynamics.

Using the d:screet 4061s with the Wisycom transmitters is a first for McCoy, a long-time enthusiast of DPA Microphones. New York-based Gotham Sound supplied the one dozen d:screets and beltpacks for Rising Star. McCoy chose the d:screet 4061 because it has a lower sensitivity and can handle 144dB SPL, which allows him to avoid distortion on the powerful singing voices. In addition, post requires vibrant-sounding mics that can be concealed, and DPA was the perfect solution.

“Wisycom’s transmitters are essentially the Ferrari of wireless,” adds McCoy. “I’ve been using DPA d:screets for years, and now I’m hearing them with new parameters. Since the transmitter is equipped with an AF input mic powering at 5.5 V, as opposed to the standard three or four, we can get an enhanced dynamic range and improved frequency response from the microphones. It’s been a real ‘ear opener,’ if you will. Using the d:screet 4061s and transmitter with a 24-bit 96 KHz A/D and D/A converters gives me a sound that makes me feel like I’m back in a recording studio while I’m in the field. It’s really interesting to me to find that, with proper amplification, DPA mics can give you so much more.”

The d:screet 4061 also makes it quick and easy for McCoy to swap users between a dialogue setup and a vocal arrangement. “The fact that I can use this mic for both styles is super effective,” he says. “I don’t need more gain and additional compressors, and I don’t have to slam on another limiter; I just need fade up and fade down. It’s freeing to be able to have a mic and transmitter combo that works so well together. I’ve been wondering for years how it is that European broadcasts sound so much better than here in the states, and I think I found the secret.”

Rising Star is based on a new format in which the audience judges the contestants in real-time through social media across three time zones. Voting is conducted through Facebook and Twitter to decide if a competitor moves ahead in the show, right in that moment.

Currently the owner and operator of ToneMesa, Inc., a location and post audio company based in Los Angeles, McCoy has received two Daytime Emmy Awards for “Best Live Audio Mix to Tape” for his work on the Ellen Degeneres Show and a Grammy® Award nomination for “Best Engineered Album” for Brian Wilson’s first self-titled solo project. In early 2008, McCoy became one of the youngest members to join the Cinema Audio Society.

ABOUT DPA:
DPA Microphones is the leading Danish Professional Audio manufacturer of high-quality condenser microphone solutions for professional applications. DPA’s ultimate goal is to always provide its customers with the absolute finest possible microphone solutions for all its markets, which include live sound, installation, recording, theatre and broadcast. When it comes to the design process, DPA takes no shortcuts. Nor does the company compromise on its manufacturing process, which is done at the DPA factory in Denmark. As a result, DPA’s products are globally praised for their exceptional clarity and transparency, unparalleled specifications, supreme reliability and, above all, pure, uncolored and undistorted sound.

For more information on DPA Microphones, please visit www.dpamicrophones.com.

SSL Live on Tour with Michael McDonald

“Because of the separation you get with the summing in the mix bus, it’s easier to place things in the mix”

NASHVILLE – Blue-eyed soul singer Michael McDonald joins 1980s super-group Toto this summer for a North American co-bill that stops at The Greek in Los Angeles and The Fox in Atlanta. McDonald’s front-of-house engineer Curtis Flatt was first introduced to Spectrum Sound of Nashville while in college and went to work for the company in 1986. Through the long association, Flatt’s career has spanned the best consoles and musicians of the last three decades, including Wynona Judd and the Judds, Donny Osmond and Michael W. Smith. He also filled in for a short time for Robert Collins on Eric Clapton. Today, he can be found at McDonald’s helm with an SSL Live console.

Flatt first took SSL Live out on McDonald’s Christmas Tour last winter. “Spectrum was going to order a pair for Jason Aldean and asked if I wanted to be the first to take one out,” he says. “I programmed it in my office and, without a production rehearsal, dove in at the first sound check. Michael’s musicians’ sounds are really good to start with. They play really well together and it’s a straightforward show. If you start with a good sounding product, mic it with quality microphones and run it through a console that has an excellent quality, you’re pretty much there. SSL Live brings me to that point and gives me the freedom to just mix and not have to think about a lot of external processes.”

The transparency of SSL Live’s mix bus, especially since it is a digital console, was one of the first things Flatt noticed. “There are a handful of consoles out there that sound good or really good, but as everybody who mixes knows, as you start to sum all those good sounding parts together, a lot of times you’re either working with or around the console to create that final sound, that final mix,” he explains. “On a warm console, you may have to figure out which inputs could lose a little warmth to fit in with everything so that it doesn’t get muddy. Live has such a separation that as you add all of the inputs, you don’t have this muddle going on, which happens so often on other live consoles. There’s definition to everything in the mix.”

Flatt credits the fidelity both in the highs and the lows of the console. “There’s a nice top-end on it and it’s really smooth; there isn’t an overabundance of hype on it,” he says, adding, “The low-end on the console is nice and round without being overbearing.”

He also notes an improvement in mixing and panning compared to other consoles. “Because of the separation you get with the summing in the mix bus, it’s easier to place things in the mix,” he says. “The palette is more open, so placement in the mix becomes really noticeable. Slight pans and movements here and there present a better picture. You hear subtle differences. For example, our drummer had two hi-hats; one was panned slightly left and one was barely right – and I mean barely, but you always knew which one he was playing, even with your eyes closed.

“I run a couple of parallel-compression bus groups because we try to maintain a certain level in the show and want to add a little bit of punch back into that in some areas without overly compressing the entire mix,” he continues. “So, I have a parallel drum group and a parallel background vocal group to level them out a little bit and add them in as needed. If the show really starts to push a little bit, there may be a dB or two of compression with the bus compressor, but the show is very dynamic so I don’t want to take the dynamics out, since the music lends itself to dynamics. It’s got pop, rock and R&B.”

The difference the SSL Live console makes during a performance is starting to gain recognition from the entire McDonald camp. “It’s not only been noticed by Michael and the band, but also management, other members of the crew and even some diehard fans noticed that something was different,” Flatt says. “When we did our first fly date after coming back from being on tour, I was using a different console because we flew in for a one-off show. Michael walked past FOH to say ‘hi,’ and when he looked over at the console and saw it wasn’t the SSL Live, he said, ‘Oh, it’s one of those.’ So it’s definitely something that he and the band have noticed; that management and production management have said ‘Yeah, we’re going to carry the SSL console, you don’t have to fight for it.’ ”

Solid State Logic is the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for music, broadcast, live and post production professionals. For more information about our award-winning products, please visit: www.solidstatelogic.com.

Alcorn McBride Supports Three New Powerhouse Exhibits at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis

Three large, new headline-making exhibits at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis are using an array of Alcorn McBride equipment for show control, lighting control, and audio and video playback.

Known as the world’s biggest and best museum for children and families, the venue’s mission is to create extraordinary learning experiences across the arts, sciences and humanities that have the power to transform the lives of children and families. The nearly 500,000-square-foot museum boasts almost 120,000 artifacts and draws 1.25 million visitors annually.

“It’s important to understand that this is a place for children and families where they can learn together and share interactive experiences brought to life through sound and light shows that are made more authentic utilizing tools such as the Alcorn McBride equipment. We find those kinds of details make our visitors feel as if they’re in the actual place depicted in the exhibit,” says Kimberly Harms, Director of Media and Public Relations.

Chief Technical Officer David Donaldson notes that, The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis’ exhibits are strategically designed to encourage family interaction and intergenerational learning vis-à-vis a number of touch points. “High-quality sound and light shows stimulate the senses and help create a feeling in which children and families experience what it would be like to wander around another time or place via high definition video and sound recreations,” he explains. “These immersive experiences make it seem as though you really are in China or traveling the earth 77 million years ago.”

“Leonardo: The Mummified Dinosaur” opened at the museum in March. “We have a permanent exhibit called Dinosphere that is housed in a former CineDome, a large-format theater. It has about 150 programmable lights and artifacts,” says Donaldson. “In part of Dinosphere is Leonardo, the largest intact dinosaur ever discovered and one of only four mummified dinosaurs in the world. He’s about 20 feet long and 77 million years old.” Leonardo is a juvenile Hadrosaur, or plant-eating “duckbill” dinosaur. He was unearthed in Montana in 2001.

“Leonardo is in a special glass case with a sound and light show that tells his story,” Donaldson explains. “He’s already one of our most popular exhibits.”

Alcorn McBride equipment plays a key role in the Dinosphere and the Leonardo exhibits. At the heart of the Dinosphere is a V16 Pro show controller. An A/V Binloop HD handles video playback on monitors throughout Dinosphere. Two Lightcue DMX recorder/players are on hand, one for Dinosphere and one that manages 15 separate lights above the Leonardo exhibit. A single-channel AM4 MP3 and WAV player runs Leonardo’s soundtrack in synch with his lighting. When Leonardo’s seven-minute show is not running a Digital Video Machine HD 8400 plays back animated loops on a 90-inch flat panel display.

“Everything works very well,” Donaldson says. “We have been very happy with the Alcorn McBride gear we use as it has been very reliable and is solid state.”

Two new exhibits opened in May. “Take Me There:(r) China” is the second exhibition to explore modern life in a single culture. Take Me There:(r) Egypt was the first. To get visitors in the mood to travel, they board an airplane fuselage where two video monitors are mounted on the front wall of the cabin and two overhead. Five rows of seats are offered, and windows line the sides. Three slots in an AV Binloop HD play back trip content: a video of flight attendants talking about the journey and views outside the windows. The Binloop triggers buttkickers underneath the seats, which simulate air turbulence.

Elsewhere in “Take Me There:(r) China” an AM4 plays ambient music and street noise in the market place, calligraphy shop, medicine shop and tea house. In a bullet train experience, visitors sit in two rows of seats facing each other with a window in between on which a Digital Video Machine HD 8400 plays back footage shot on the super-speedy bullet train. An additional AM4 is available in a performance space. Staff can press wall buttons to access a series of audio clips programmed directly into the system.

Also in the China gallery is “Terra Cotta Warriors: The Emperor’s Painted Army,” the first children’s museum appearance by the famed tomb statuary since they were excavated near Xian, China in 1974. Fifty visitors at a time are brought into the entry theater’s cue line where they watch a video run off a Digital Video Machine HD 8400. Then they walk into the dimly lit gallery where all of the sound in the 15,000-square-foot space emanates from an AM4. A concluding theater experience features two video walls running a loop from an Alcorn McBride Binloop.

The museum’s Playscape permanent exhibit also features an A/V Binloop HD for its cue line. Playscape incorporates new brain research to create an authentic, physical space to help young families explore some of the most important developmental touchstones of children’s lives. The Binloop runs video in synch for families waiting to enter the space.

“Alcorn McBride equipment has become a standard for us and a very good investment,” says Donaldson. “It’s very reliable, all solid state. When you have families involved, reliability is of the essence. We have a very low threshold for things that don’t work!”

Donaldson also gives kudos to Alcorn McBride’s staff, whom he calls “very responsive. I can always reach someone if I need something – it’s like they’re working right along with us.”

About Alcorn McBride:
Founded in 1986, Alcorn McBride is the leading manufacturer of show control, audio and video equipment for the themed entertainment industry, and a rapidly growing provider of audio and video systems for retail environments and transportation applications. Staffed by some of the industry’s best engineers and backed by outstanding customer support, the company has demonstrated great agility in bringing new designs to market. A hallmark of Alcorn McBride products is their durable, zero maintenance design. The company’s products provide consistent, reliable operation for audio and video playback applications worldwide. For more information, visit www.alcorn.com.

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Video Devices PIX 260i Streamlines Multi-Campus Workflow For Bethlehem Baptist Church

MINNEAPOLIS, JULY 8, 2014 – When Bethlehem Baptist Church was looking for a reliable video/audio solution for recording and playback of weekly services among the house of worship’s multiple campuses, it turned to the PIX 260i Production Video Recorder from Video Devices, a new brand of Sound Devices that is dedicated to the company’s mission critical video products. The church utilizes five PIX 260i’s to ensure the highest quality video and audio when rebroadcasting sermons to the campuses.

Comprised of three campuses (Downtown, North and South), Bethlehem Baptist Church hosts multiple services a week. In order to ensure that all three campuses have a current sermon from the main pastor, Associate Director for Media Ministries Jonathan Davis records the Saturday night service using the PIX 260i. He then sends the recording for playback to the two campuses not being served by the preaching pastor, on a particular Sunday morning. Recorded files can be transferred over Ethernet or delivered on one of the four drives that the 260i is able to simultaneously record to. The Downtown and North campuses feature a full production setup, while the South Campus is a portable campus at a local high school for the Sunday morning services. The Downtown and North campuses each have two PIX 260is, and the South campus has another.

The PIX 260i’s extensive audio capabilities are an essential component for the facility. The facility records both the mono- and stereo-feed of the house, as well as an iso of the pastor’s mic. Using the PIX 260i, the facility is able to send and receive all audio over Dante to and from its Yamaha CL5 mixing system. In order to cater to its ethnically diverse members, Bethlehem Baptist Church also records live Spanish and Russian translations. The multiple track count gives the facility room to grow in terms of having additional isolated audio tracks available, when needed. In addition, with only two full-time media staff members, the facility needed a user-friendly solution to cater to its large volunteer base. The PIX 260i’s large display and easy-to-use controls enable non-professionals to use the equipment with ease on an ongoing basis.

“We found that the PIX 260i met all of our criteria, and most importantly, it was seamlessly incorporated into our existing AV system,” says Davis. “The PIX 260i gives us ultimate flexibility in being able to record content from SDI or HDMI, and to get that content back out just as easily. In addition, the PIX 260i allows us to take whatever we record and deliver it directly into our post-production workflow in order to post services online as well as streamline our other productions.”

Davis and the church are already familiar with the company’s products, as they have used its PIX 240i recorder for on-location productions. “We found the PIX 240i to be very proficient and an improvement to our workflow, so when we heard about the PIX 260i, we knew we had to give it a look. It sounded perfect for what we needed,” says Davis. “We needed something that was rock-solid reliable, because when it comes to church services, it is a timed event. There isn’t a backup and you don’t get a do-over. The Video Devices PIX 260i gives us the reliability and redundancy we need to ensure that we capture the services and are able to play them back at both our fixed and mobile locations.”

The PIX 260i brings the features and tools needed by production companies and other production-based AV environments looking to migrate to file-based recording and playback environments. It records either QuickTime files in either Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD video formats or WAV format audio files. Files recorded with Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD are ready for editing in common editing environments, such as Avid, Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere, eliminating time-consuming transferring and transcoding. For color-critical applications, the PIX 260i supports Apple ProRes 4444 through its 12-bit, 4:4:4 3G-SDI I/O. Users can also play out files from the PIX 260i for real-time applications.

Continuing the company’s heritage in production sound, the PIX 260i is infused with 32-track audio recording and playback capabilities. In addition to 16 channels of embedded SDI audio and eight channels of HDMI audio, the PIX 260i also accepts eight channels of line-level analog I/O and eight channels of AES digital audio. Using Dante, the PIX 260i can accept and transmit up to 32 channels of audio over Ethernet.

“The customer service that we receive from Sound Devices has been absolutely amazing,” adds Davis. “One of my favorite things about Sound Devices is how proactive they are in sending out firmware updates — not only do they fix any potential bugs, but they add new features, which is rare today. They take such great care of their customers.”

Video Devices, a brand of Sound Devices, produces digital video recorders and related products that address a range of multiple-source video productions, including fast-paced, mission-critical studio applications, live sports, live events and mobile production. Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, live event and acoustical test and measurement applications. Founded in 1998, the company designs and manufactures both brands from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit Video Devices and Sound Devices websites, www.videodevices.com; www.sounddevices.com.

Lausanne’s Olympic Museum Reopens with AV System Design, Engineering and Integration by Electrosonic

When The Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland, reopened recently after a two-year renovation, it made extensive use of audio-visual and interactive techniques that take visitors on what’s been called “a multidimensional journey across the Olympic Universe.” Electrosonic designed the AV system, which is simple for visitors to use and offers maximum flexibility for the museum, under subcontract with media producer Centre Screen Productions of Manchester, England. Electrosonic handled the system engineering and integration under a separate subcontract with Paragon Creative of York, England.

Located on the shores of Lake Geneva, The Olympic Museum is now a greatly expanded, four-level venue spanning more than 32,000 square feet and featuring over 1,000 objects and 150 screens, which deliver an informative and immersive experience to Olympic fans and the curious from around the world. Visitors can tailor their tours to capture a broad view of the games or engage in an in-depth Olympic experience. The augmented reality created by the museum allows each person to seek the information and emotion they’re looking for and perhaps return home with some unexpected knowledge.

Ghostly images of the torch relay, projected onto a curtain of flexible, vertical silicone rubber rods, greet visitors as they walk up the ramp to the uppermost exhibit area, Level 1. The impressive, panoramic “Welcome to Olympia” display shows the origins of the games in ancient Greece. Created by three edge-blended Panasonic projectors, it’s the first of several panoramas visitors encounter. All of them feature multi-channel sound with Tannoy speakers.

The figures of athletes on ancient Greek vases come alive in an engaging interactive table display. The figures on the pottery are animated and displayed directly onto the table surface by projectiondesign projectors. LCDs provide information about the sports shown.

Also making a hit with visitors on Level 1 are the “Olympic Torch” exhibit and the “Historical Timeline.” The torch display includes an array of torches interpreted by six 22-inch Iiyama touch screens, a Panasonic projection of the lighting of the Olympic flame on a screen that can be viewed from front or back, and a stylized projection of flames dancing on the floor, which is part of the exhibit lighting.

The timeline uses five Panasonic projectors to produce one very long image of a “library” whose volumes relate to specific Olympic games. Five small interactive podiums enable visitors to open up a volume of their choice and see a compilation of images from that year’s games play out across parts of the timeline.

Another Panasonic three-projector panorama, this one dedicated to “The Best of Opening Ceremonies” from the games, completes the tour of Level 1.

Level 0, where the stories of the Summer Games, Winter Games, Paralympics and Youth Olympics are told, features a number of surround screens with multi-image content. Interactive displays in each area are based on 7thSense Delta server architecture for remote updating of content as needed. The panoramic “Inside the Race,” with five edge-blended Panasonic projectors, envelops visitors with highlights from the games and close-up looks at the athletes’ grit and determination to succeed.

The lowest exhibition level, Level -1, is devoted to the theme of “The Olympic Spirit.” The International Plaza has a three-screen display as well as three stacks of 55-inch, narrow-bezel Panasonic LCDs. Another three projector display acts as a backdrop to an exhibit of Olympic medals.

The “Words of Olympians” exhibit enables visitors to learn about athletes and hear their own accounts of participating in the games. Twenty AV stations, featuring 22-inch Iiyama LCDs, play looped programs. Stop and Listen Gorilla handsets deliver the audio.

The great number of screens throughout The Olympic Museum challenged Electrosonic to develop a consistent approach to the overall systems design. That approach is based on carrying all the video, audio and control signals on standard CAT-6 cabling; housing all computers and servers in racks in dedicated control rooms near the exhibits they serve; and minimizing variations in practicable equipment.

Four control rooms on the three different levels are outfitted with 19 equipment racks. The racks in each control room represent a sub-system under the control of a Medialon system controller. One of the Level 1 control rooms has been designated the Master control room for overall system control and linking to the museum’s Building Management System for automatic scheduled operation.

Electrosonic also specified a standard OEM computer for the interactive exhibits to ensure consistency of performance and to simplify maintenance. Delays due to compatibility problems that might not have been discovered until equipment arrived on site were eliminated by test-running the content on the standard computer prior to delivery.

Mark Pyrah, CEO of Paragon Creative Ltd said, “As turnkey fit out contractor we worked closely with fellow British companies Centre Screen and Electrosonic to create seamless immersive environments that entertain, thrill and motivate in an entertaining and memorable way. We are delighted to say that the project was completed to both schedule and budget. We are immensely proud to have been involved in this stunning project.”
“Electrosonic put together a first class team, and from the kickoff meeting in Lausanne to the final installation 18 months later, the whole team performed superbly,” said Dave Postlethwaite, CEO of Centre Screen Production. “As a software producer you need a hardware company that is experienced, flexible, rigorous in their methodology and systems and, very importantly, has a team with boundless enthusiasm; Electrosonic had it all!”
Concluded David Rodriguez, Project Manager for the Technology and Information Department at the International Olympic Committee (IOC), “Electrosonic worked with the content manager, the integrator and the IOC, taking into account the needs of each and proposing technical solutions complying with the technical and energy-saving standards of the country. All of the interactive terminals, 98 projectors and 30 large-screen monitors and respective PCs were installed within very tightly imposed deadlines. After six months of operation, there have been very few problems. This shows the quality of the work Electrosonic did for The Olympic Museum. We are very pleased to have been able to work on this project with them.”

London-based Metaphor was the creative advisor throughout the museum rebuild. Paragon Creative appointed Mather and Company to handle exhibition design and Sutton Vane Associates lighting design. Centre Screen named Peter Key as audio consultant.

About Electrosonic
Electrosonic, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an international audio-visual company that creates tailored, state-of-the-art solutions for a wide range of markets including theme parks, museums, control rooms, and corporate meeting rooms. Since its founding in 1964, Electrosonic has built a strong reputation for working on complex projects, both large and small, and has developed lasting partnerships with customers and suppliers. Beyond complete integrated systems, Electrosonic provides a comprehensive scope of services including technical design, projector lamp sales, maintenance and operational support.

Learn more about Electrosonic. Visit http://www.electrosonic.com

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Grove City Church of the Nazarene Upgrades to New Yamaha Digital System

BUENA PARK, Calif.—The Naz Church in Grove City, Ohio main auditorium seats approximately 2,800 people and has a congregation of 3,000. The church recently installed two Yamaha CL Series Digital Audio Consoles (a CL5 at front of house and a CL1 at monitors), eight Rio input/output boxes: two Rio3224-D, two Rio1608-D, two Ri8s, and two Ro8s. The system was purchased through Boynton Pro Audio (Norwich, NY) and installed by church staff and volunteers.

“This was not our first experience with digital consoles,” states Matt Groves, Technical Director at The Naz. “We previously used a Yamaha LS9 at monitors and a Yamaha PM1D at front of house. The purchase of the CL system began when we started looking for a replacement monitor console because our Yamaha LS9 was stolen from the monitor booth. One of our front of house engineers, Doug McLaughlin with Tech Art Productions in Columbus, suggested we purchase a CL Series, and after researching it more, we discovered how functional it would be for us. Our audio engineers are volunteers with previous digital console experience on our LS9 and PM1D, so the only training required was to watch the self-training videos on the Yamaha website. The set up and operation of the CL system was very user-friendly.”

The Church of the Nazarene has both traditional and contemporary services. The traditional service consists of an 80-member choir, a 15-piece orchestra, a rhythm section (with a five- piece drum kit, two digital keyboards, bass, two acoustic guitars, one electric guitar, synth/tracks), and seven main vocalists. The contemporary service consists of a five-piece drum kit, digital keyboard, bass, acoustic guitar, two electric guitars, synth/tracks, and four vocalists.

“Because of the many components each service style presents, we felt it was a good opportunity to start our CL system upgrade,” Groves said. “We decided to purchase a CL1 with a Rio3224-D first to replace the monitor console, and our master plan was to eventually purchase a CL5 for front of house. A couple of weeks after installing the CL1, we began having major issues and failures with our then existing analog wiring and patch bays, so we decided to accelerate the completion of our system and purchased the CL5 along with the seven additional Rio boxes.”

Groves said the features that determined the church selection of the CL Series was the Dante networking and the ability to bypass their old/existing wiring. “The use of the Dante system is so functional for us as a church,” he says. “Since we run two very different style worship services and host many events and concerts throughout the year, having the Dante network gives us the flexibility we need. We also needed to replace the existing wiring and patch bays so being able to run a redundant network with Cat5e cable between the consoles and Rio boxes was a huge cost savings for us. Our system now sounds the cleanest it has ever sounded.”

The Naz also upgraded part of their video system infrastructure using Ross Video’s Carbonite 2M 24 Switcher MultiMedia Edition. The video control room is home to the switcher along with two 60″ Panasonic plasma displays for multi-viewer use with the Carbonite, along with three 24″ LCD displays for preview use. The church staff records to two solid-state hard drives using Blackmagic’s Hyperdeck Studio Pro. Four Mac Pro’s are used for video playback, lyric projection, and live streaming of services, using Livestream as their streaming service provider.

“We currently run five cameras,” Groves notes, “however, these are still our older cameras (three Sony D-30′s and two Canon XH-A1’s). Right now we are meshing our standard definition cameras with the high definition infrastructure, which took some doing, but works great now after some trial and error and many converters.”

With regard to the new Yamaha system, Groves said the system has unbelievable clarity. “It’s amazing when you have the system on and can’t tell it’s on. Before the installation, our system was pretty noisy from the analog wiring and patch bays, but now there is no noise at all. The clarity and depth of sound we’re getting from this system is amazing!”

For more information on The Naz, visit www.thenaz.tv.

For more information on Yamaha CL Digital Audio Consoles, visit www.yamahaca.com.

-END-

About Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc.:
Yamaha Commercial Audio Systems, Inc. (YCAS) provides a full line of integrated professional audio products offering complete systems solutions for the broadcast, sound reinforcement/installed sound, touring, commercial recording, and post production markets. With the addition of NEXO to the product line, the company remains the official U.S. and Canadian distributor for all NEXO speaker models. YCAS offers comprehensive in-house and field product training for its customers, a dedicated dealer network, and 24/7 technical support.

HD Upgrades for Melrose Community Access Include Broadcast Pix Granite 5000 System

Billerica, Massachusetts – Over the past decade, Melrose Massachusetts Television, Inc. (MMTV), the community access station for the City of Melrose, Mass., has been aggressively upgrading its production equipment. In January, the station made the move to a native HD production workflow with new cameras and an upgraded control room built around a Broadcast Pix™ Granite™ 5000 integrated production switcher.

MMTV produces a variety of original programs, including After Hours, a talk show that is shared with other regional stations, and Sound Stage, which showcases local musicians. The station also covers parades and other local events, and supports the local city government and educational channels. Original programs are available in HD on YouTube and presented locally in letterbox SD on Comcast and Verizon FiOS.

In 2010, the nonprofit community organization upgraded to an SDI workflow and a Broadcast Pix™ Slate™ 5000 integrated production switcher. While the station researched other switcher options for the HD upgrade, it chose to stick with the reliability and flexibility of Broadcast Pix. “We wanted to keep the same abilities that we had with the Slate,” said Chris DeThomas, MMTV engineer. “It is wonderful. The hardware is a professional surface and the PixPad is great.”

Access A/V of Concord, N.H., handled the integration for the HD upgrade project. The Granite 5000 was installed in January, along with an upgraded monitor wall, Behringer audio mixer, Blackmagic HyperDeck Studio disk recorder, Clear-Com digital intercom system, Lectrosonics wireless IFB and JVC ProHD cameras. The Slate 5000 was then deployed to a local middle school for student productions.

DeThomas is very pleased with the HD upgrade. “It is everything that we have always wanted in our control room,” he said. “We have a completely professional space.”

Primarily driven by volunteers, MMTV programming is produced by people with varying degrees of production experience. MMTV uses Granite’s built-in Fluent-View customizable multi-view to accommodate both volunteers who prefer a more simplified setup and production veterans who want more information on screen.

“We customize it for different users,” DeThomas explained. “We have average folks producing for the first time, plus pros who bring that professional touch to the station. Everyone feels comfortable coming in – it makes the room not as intimidating.”

MMTV has also customized its Granite to manage productions in both of its studios. The four-camera Studio A is the default, but the control panel can quickly change to a new layout for three-camera Studio B productions. “We’re able to control two studios with one switcher and do it well,” DeThomas said. “That’s a great feature.”

About Broadcast Pix Founded in 2002, Broadcast Pix is the leader in integrated production switchers, with customers in more than 110 countries. Available in several configurations, from compact systems with end-to-end integration to large-scale systems for high-end live productions, Broadcast Pix switchers include CG, dual clip stores, file-based macros, external control software, and customizable multi-view and virtual sets with patented control options. Broadcast Pix also offers ReVue next generation slow motion systems, fX3D real-time 3D graphics, Rapid CG dynamic graphic playout software, and VOX voice-automated live video production, each designed to enhance our highly integrated live production switchers. Customers include leading broadcast, corporate, education, government, religious, sports, streaming, and visual radio studios. Learn more at www.broadcastpix.com.

Broadcast Pix, Granite and Slate are trademarks of Broadcast Pix, Inc. Patented. Made in USA.

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Linear Launches Intelligent Three-Way Z-Wave Light Switch

Unlike most three-way switches that require a traveler wire, this smart switch can be installed just about anywhere there’s AC power

Carlsbad, CA – July 7, 2014 – Leading security and home automation, access control, and health and wellness manufacturer for residential and commercial markets, Linear LLC today announced the launch of its 3-way Z-Wave® smart switch, model WT00Z™. The new Z-Wave smart switch allows remote ON/OFF control and dimming of as many as five other Z-Wave controlled lights, and adds another intelligent control solution to Linear’s Internet of Things (IoT) portfolio. Linear, including its 2GIG® brand of products, is the largest user of Z-Wave chipsets in the world. Obituary

The Linear® WT00Z™ smart switch gives professional security and home automation installers an invaluable tool by offering a desirable home control lighting function that previously was either not possible or practical. Because the Linear 3-way smart switch does not directly control a load, it can serve as a virtual 3-way switch and be wired anywhere power is available, without the need for a traveler wire. When paired with a 2GIG® Go!Control® system, or other brand of home automation controller, the 3-way Z-Wave smart switch offers simple control of one, two or as many as five other lights, making it easy for consumers to quickly illuminate or extinguish lights with a simple flip of a nearby wall switch.

“This new 3-way Z-Wave switch is extremely important to our portfolio of connected devices. It solves a vexing problem for installers, while bolstering the capabilities and value of the Go!Control® automation panels they install. Controlling a light from two locations is a convenience most people have come to expect, but anyone who’s done electrical wiring knows it’s not always that simple,” said Duane Paulson, senior vice president of product and market development for Linear. “This new Z-Wave smart switch makes it easy. This is another example of our commitment to bring smarter products to market that add convenience, while enhancing the value of our 2GIG® home control platform, which continues to accelerate in popularity.”

Linear is also a principal member of the Z-Wave Alliance. “Z-Wave is at the heart of the world’s largest ecosystem of interoperable smart products, and it will continue to grow. Our partnership is stronger than ever and we remain committed to bringing innovative, intelligent Z-Wave control solutions to the residential and commercial markets,” continued Paulson.

Z-Wave® is an international wireless standard for intelligent, interoperable, low-power, RF mesh networking technology. This powerful smart chip and compact protocol enable two-way RF communications among Z-Wave enabled devices. Linear is now manufacturing, selling and distributing Z-Wave lighting control products that include: wall dimmers, wall switches, wall outlets, lamp modules, appliance modules, 3-way switches/dimmers, fixture modules, as well as international versions of the same products plus other Z-Wave enabled security and convenience devices. Linear also has the capability to utilize its extensive OEM experience to manufacture Z-Wave products for partner companies seeking their own intelligent lighting solutions.

For more information about the WT00Z™ 3-way Z-Wave smart switch, please visit www.linearcorp.com/threeway. For more information about Linear LLC, please visit www.linearcorp.com or call 1-800-421-1587. Linear can also be found on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

About Linear LLC
Headquartered in Carlsbad, California, Linear LLC is an innovator in the health and wellness, security and access control markets. Since 1961, the company has designed and manufactured more than 2,500 products for residential and commercial use. Today, Linear is focused on wired and wireless technology serving the access control, security and connected business and home needs of its dealers, customers and OEM partners. The Go!Control® home management system and a growing range of Z-Wave automation, commercial entry and wellness products position Linear as a competitor in multiple growth industries for the long-term future.

Linear is a subsidiary of Nortek, Inc. (Nasdaq: NTK) a global, diversified company whose many market-leading brands deliver broad capabilities and a wide array of innovative, technology-driven products and solutions for lifestyle improvement at home and at work. Please visit www.nortekinc.com for more information.

White Mark Designs A New Foley Studio At Moscow’s CineLab

Studio design consultancy White Mark Ltd played an important role in creating a new Foley studio for Russia’s state of the art film sound facility CineLab Ltd. Unashamedly designed to be the best in the world, CineLab’s Foley studio is already attracting projects from both local and international clients.

Based in Moscow and housed in a completely renovated former cold store building on the banks of the Moskva River, CineLab already has 14 studios including three dubbing theatres, a 5.1 mixing room for pre-mixes and TV/DVD work, multiple edit and pre-production suites and sound design rooms. Three of CineLab’s dubbing theatres have Dolby Premier Licenses, and one of these was recently upgraded by White Mark to Dolby Atmos 3D spec.

The facility’s new Foley studio was designed to cater for two very distinctive approaches to Foley recording, says CineLab’s Managing Director Vadim Nerukov.

“Some Foley artists want to close mic everything and then add effects, compression, reverb, etc. afterwards in the control room,” he explains. “Others prefer a more ‘naturalistic’ approach where they use the space and air in the room and real reflections from the walls. In our opinion neither approach is the best – they are simply different. We wanted a room that could cope with both.”

To achieve this result, White Mark worked closely with internationally acclaimed and award-winning Foley artist and sound designer Nicolas Becker, whose credits include Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, The Ninth Gate, The Pianist, Oliver Twist, The Ghost and Venus In Furs, all directed by Roman Polanski.

White Mark’s managing director, David Bell says: “We designed and built the room from scratch, including every conceivable kind of indoor and outdoor surface. We also incorporated motorized ceiling panels and wall curtains that can be used to modify the room acoustics, and a special floor mounted on acoustic pads that can be tuned to different frequencies by tightening or loosening screws.

Bell adds that White Mark obviously included a conventional control room in its design but after speaking to Becker and watching him work, the company also positioned an additional mixing and recording area in the centre of the live room with a line of sight into each of the studio’s four working zones.

“This dedicated space allows the artists like Nicolas who prefer to work naturally to move around the studio and create sounds to the picture in real time,” David Bell says. “The picture is projected onto screens and the engineer working with him has five microphone positions at his disposal and can literally mix live, building up each scene, sound by sound.”

White Mark installed a 5.1 surround sound system in the Control Room, while the live room, which has four screens in different positions, has a theatrical-style loudspeaker system (Left-centre-Right) behind the main screen. This allows the Foley artist to work to picture and hear exactly what a cinema audience will ultimately hear.

Naturally the studio is filled with props and devices to create new sounds – and there is a dedicated large storage room with a car access dock so that bigger props can be brought in.

“This is, without doubt, the most impressive Foley room I’ve ever seen – and certainly the most impressive we’ve ever built,” David Bell adds. “Of course, having carte blanche to create something special did help – as did the fact that CineLab was effectively built from the ground up so we could incorporate features like the very thick cast concrete floor, incorporating deep pits and water pools of different depths, and the loading dock very early on in the design process.”

Vadim Nerukov says that completing CineLab’s Foley studio involved the most innovation in terms of ideas, design and workflow.

“As our design partner, White Mark has achieved great results with all of the rooms in the facility,” Nerukov says. “In our view they are the best acoustic design company on the market and we’re thrilled with the Foley room – it is quite simply magnificent.”

Recent projects undertaken at CineLab include the mix for the feature film Stalingrad, carried out by Vincent Arnardi, and the mix for Viy, carried out by four times Oscar winning sound engineer Bob Beemer. CineLab has also recently completed the Russian dub of The Amazing Spiderman 2, one of the first projects to take place in its newly accredited Dolby Atmos theatre.

-ends-

About White Mark:

Established in 1997 by David Bell, John Dunnill, Derek Buckingham and Alan Cundell, White Mark Ltd specialises in production facilities for music recording and the film and television industries. Over the last fifteen years it has designed and supervised the construction of over 500 production suites worldwide. The company’s impressive client list encompasses some of the world’s most famous music recording facilities including Peter Gabriel’s Real World Studios in the UK, Germano Studios in New York, Hit Factory/Criteria Recording Studios in Miami, Strongroom in London and private studios for producers and musicians such as William Orbit and Damon Albarn. In the area of audio post production, White Mark has completed over 140 audio studios and many broadcast and video editing facilities for more than 60 companies in Soho alone. The list of clients includes Grand Central, Hackenbacker, Envy, De Lane Lea, Scramble, Lipsync, Molinare, DeLuxe, 750mph, NBC/Universal, Wave, Unit and Boom. Advertising agency clients include worldwide facilities for Hogarth International and AMV/BBDO on four continents.
www.whitemark.com

SCOTT PETITO PRODUCTIONS ADDS A 1608 CONSOLE “THE BEST PIECE OF GEAR FROM API”

WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK – JULY 2014: Musician, audio engineer, and studio owner Scott Petito has roots in the jazz and acoustic genres that go back to the early 1980s. His studio, Scott Petito Productions, has worked with major acts including James Taylor, Keith Richards, Pete Seeger, Bela Fleck, and Brian Setzer. In an effort to return to his roots in analog recording, Scott consulted Alto Music in Middletown, New York, who directed him toward an API 1608.

“It’s the best piece of gear I have ever used from API,” said Scott. “I have mixed on the Vision and Legacy consoles, as well as several vintage consoles. This has that same sound, but in a compact, simple and reasonable affordable design. It’s new, reliable, and has a great warranty.” The console has 24 channel inputs and 32 slots, providing over 48 reruns from Pro Tools. “It quickly became clear that it’s the only choice for uncompromising analog sound, and a familiar character and layout.”

With a degree from Berklee College of Music and countless hours in the studio, the sound generated by the 1608 is held to a high standard by Scott. “I already can feel and hear the added depth and dimensionality. It makes it easier to get what I want, I use fewer plug-ins, and being a smaller footprint the short signal path is always pristine and clear. It also has great headroom.”

Also among his favorite features and functions, Scott appreciates the Channel Strip and lunchbox implementation. “It lets me keep a lot of flavors on hand. The routing is wonderful. We have everything coming up on the patchbay.”

Scott and his crew wasted no time in getting to know the capabilities of the 1608. “The first session even before everything was wired to the patchbay or furniture was installed, we recorded a new album with Tony Levin, the bassist for Peter Gabriel and King Crimson among others. It’s turning out great! We are now mixing it.”

Next, the new 1608 will be used to mix the new album from Mercury Rev, whose fourth studio album Deserters Song was voted as one of the top twenty most influential albums of the last twenty years by Mojo Magazine. Scott will also use the new console to mix a new album of his own.

ABOUT API (AUTOMATED PROCESSES, INC.) Established more than 45 years ago, Automated Processes, Inc. is the leader in analog recording gear with the Vision, Legacy Series, 1608 and THE BOX recording consoles, as well as its classic line of modular signal processing equipment.

www.apiaudio.com

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